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PICList Thread
'[OT] Hoist by my own petard'
2008\02\21@184354 by Jinx

face picon face
After years of clever-dick messing with shop-staff heads, one got
me back. I mistakenly bought a drum of 100 blank DVD-R instead
of CD-R. Taking it back later in the day I was told "Sorry, we don't
accept disc returns because they might have been copied"

Wow. Unexpected halt to proceedings

"But they're blank" I protested

"Sorry, store policy"

Awkward pause

Till jockey then gave me that gotcha wink, and I got my store credit

Will it stop me bouncing up to loitering staff with a "Hi, can I help
you ?". Will I think twice about inviting two till staff to "C'mon, fight
over me" ?

Nah

Don't like spending money, might as well cheer at least my day up
and try and spread a little humour

2008\02\21@192626 by Marcel Duchamp

picon face
Wait a day or two and then go back to inquire if they have re-winders
for those...

Jinx wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\02\22@111849 by Robert Young

picon face

>
> Wait a day or two and then go back to inquire if they have re-winders
> for those...
>
> Jinx wrote:
>> After years of clever-dick messing with shop-staff heads, one got
>> me back.

--- snip ---

Obnoxious, but I like to be deliberately slow getting out change when I'm paying cash.  Usually the clerk gets in a hurry and keys the bill amount and just totals out before I ever get out the $0.03 it would take to get me back a nice pile of silver.  Nothing brings a store to a halt faster then watching them try to make change in their heads! :)

Rob

2008\02\22@120438 by John Gardner

picon face
I'm a big fan of cash register keyboards which
have pictures of burgers, fries, cokes, etc, on
the keys instead of numbers.

And they still get it wrong.  :)

Went in a RV supply place looking for a propane
burner - Kind of expensive at $40 but I needed it
to get shop equipment back on line - At the register
the young woman rang up $14.87.

When asked she said it was on clearance, so I
hustled back & grabbed the remaining two off the
shelf. New total $35 & change. I said "That can't be
right", and she obligingly redid the calculation; New
total $28 + change... I give up, paid and got back to
the shop.

Shame on me, I guess.

Jack

On 2/22/08, Robert Young <spam_OUTrwybeakerTakeThisOuTspamhotmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\02\22@135315 by Tony Smith

flavicon
face
> > Jinx wrote:
> >> After years of clever-dick messing with shop-staff heads,
> one got me
> >> back.
>
> --- snip ---
>
> Obnoxious, but I like to be deliberately slow getting out
> change when I'm paying cash.  Usually the clerk gets in a
> hurry and keys the bill amount and just totals out before I
> ever get out the $0.03 it would take to get me back a nice
> pile of silver.  Nothing brings a store to a halt faster then
> watching them try to make change in their heads! :)


I often point how men & women act differently in supermarket queue.  Women
tend to be startled by the 'and that'll be $$$' comment from the cashier, as
if the idea of having to pay had never occurred to them.  This leads to a
rummage thru the bag, then a rummage thru the purse etc etc.

Meanwhile the men towards the head of the queue are jingling the few coins
needed to buy the milk or waving a note about, often giving it to the
cashier at the same time as the items.

All of them waiting are fantasising about punching the woman slowing thing
down in the back of the head.  Doubly so if she pulls out a cheque book.
Cheques, I mean, come on, 1950 was years ago.

I think anyone doing it for fun should be hoisted on a petard.  Shopping?
Yeah, love it.  It's tops, mate.

Tony

2008\02\22@142409 by Gökhan SEVER

picon face
Just wondering, Is the title of this posting common in English?

or have you been influenced by a book or something?

like Walter Isaacson's - Einstein His Life and Universe

Just has caught this on the audio file: Bohr was able hoist Einstein by his
own petard.

On 22/02/2008, Jinx <.....joecolquittKILLspamspam@spam@clear.net.nz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\02\22@143742 by Robert Young

picon face

{Quote hidden}

Go slow, read again and I'll give you a hint.  The problem is the clerk being both too quick on the keys and too slow on the uptake to make change in their head.  If they would have waited the extra 15 seconds the follow-on 3 minute ordeal wouldn't happen.

Rob

2008\02\22@145755 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: piclist-bouncesspamKILLspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam.....mit.edu] On Behalf
> Of Gökhan SEVER
> Sent: 22 February 2008 19:24
> To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
> Subject: Re: [OT] Hoist by my own petard
>
> Just wondering, Is the title of this posting common in English?
>

It's not used very much in everyday conversation any more.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petard

Regards

Mike

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2008\02\22@170430 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Just wondering, Is the title of this posting common in
> English?
> or have you been influenced by a book or something?
> like Walter Isaacson's - Einstein His Life and Universe
> Just has caught this on the audio file: Bohr was able
> hoist Einstein by his
> own petard.

&

> I think anyone doing it for fun should be hoisted on a
> petard.

It is not in everyday use but is common enough in the manner
that Jinx used it by people like Jinx (and me :-))
(Analysing areas of similarity between me and Jinx could be
a fascinating subject).

Many people use it or read it without understanding its
basis. The word "hoist" is Ye Olde Englifh for "foiled" /
"Caught out" / ... but people tend to think it means"pulled
up with a rope" as in 'hoisting a flag'.

At one time we had a Prime Minister who was well educated
but who used the expression and then went on to say " ...
and in his case it must be a very long one." thereby
indicating his lack of understanding of the term.

In "Lord of the Rings" in the only place where Aragorn loses
his cool (and not without cause ...) "Kill him, kill him
..." the device that Saruman has had placed against the wall
at 'Helms Deep' and which is detonated by the Orc torch
bearing suicide bomber is a Petard.

Someone else's musings with LOTR in mind

       http://foucalt.blogspot.com/2007/10/i-love-wikipedia-hoist-in-his-own.html

And nothing to do with this (despite the title)

   http://paulhelmsdeep.blogspot.com/2007/06/john-calvin-and-hiddenness-of-god.html



       Russell





2008\02\22@181749 by Jinx

face picon face
> I often point how men & women act differently in supermarket queue.
> Women tend to be startled by the 'and that'll be $$$' comment from
> the cashier, as if the idea of having to pay had never occurred to them.
>  This leads to a rummage thru the bag, then a rummage thru the purse
> etc etc.

I hear that, sister. mmm mmm

> Meanwhile the men towards the head of the queue are jingling the
> few coins needed to buy the milk or waving a note about, often
> giving it to the cashier at the same time as the items

That's me, ready to hit the streets

My pet hate is staff getting on-the-job training with the resulting
inconvenience to customers. For example, how to process a less-
common till manoeuvre like store credit for a drum of DVDs

Steps to negotiate in this exercise include, but are not limited to -

Figuring out why your staff code number doesn't work in that mode
Finding a staff member, all terribly busy, to borrow their code
Wait for the manager to be available to explain slowly and
meticulously how this credit can be accomplished
Forgetting to take into account customer's trade card
Have manager repeat, slowly and meticulously, steps from beginning
Determine that shelf price of CD replacements is incorrect
Manipulate transaction to a cash sale to get around inventory debit
problem
Finalise transaction, but don't apologise to fidgety, muttering,
customer and lengthy queue who think it's all fidgety, muttering
customer's fault

Fidgety, muttering customer at last hits the streets with drum
of CDs vowing never ever again to pick the wrong item off the
shelf

2008\02\22@182744 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
Quoting Gökhan SEVER <EraseMEgstr2005spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com>:

> Just wondering, Is the title of this posting common in English?
>
> or have you been influenced by a book or something?
>
> like Walter Isaacson's - Einstein His Life and Universe
>
> Just has caught this on the audio file: Bohr was able hoist Einstein by his
> own petard.
>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petard

    For 'tis the sport to have the enginer
    Hoist with his own petard;

Note also the reference to the Bard's off-color joke-- the amusing
image of the engineer hoisted into the air with his own flatulence--
an ever-present danger with older practitioners of the Art.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
s...spamspam_OUTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com

2008\02\22@193239 by cdb

flavicon
face
Being well aware that many Australian and others would consider the British shop assistant rude and sullen (though I find being asked how I am and addressed by my first name by someone i don't know, and who doesn't really give a damn (my dear) about me, annoying and obnoxious), I am constantly surprised at how the Australian supermarket shopper is quite content to wait in a large slow moving queue because said shop has only staffed 3 of it's 18 checkouts at peak time, only muttering if the assistant forgets to say 'hello how are you' in that bored I don't give a f#$%$%%^^$ about you really tone. Yet in England there would be shouts and cries from the waiting mob for more tills to be opened - even when all available tills are open.

I know, I used to work in a UK supermarket.

And, finding myself needing to defend to some extent the brow beaten poorly paid (in the main) shop assistant - it has to be said that after a while using a calculating device, one becomes dependant on it, so what the tills says must be correct, especially with scanning - this is one reason why I don't have a problem with calculators in the classroom, so long as the little darlings can perform basic maths before being introduced to them.

I also have to say that as most shop management is only concerned about getting money into the tills, the cashiers are actively discouraged from thinking for themselves, and many shops (David Jones ooops) manage to have internal procedures that take up more of the assistants time (such as in refunds) than if the assistant was allowed to think for themselves and worry about internal problems later - or better still the internal problem should be the manager's responsibility.

Still I remember when in Australia the greeting phrase was ' Y'er Right there', so I suppose 'Hello how are you' is an improvement.

Please don't get me started.!!!

Colin

:: Fidgety, muttering customer at last hits the streets with drum
:: of CDs vowing never ever again to pick the wrong item off the
:: shelf
--
cdb, @spam@colinKILLspamspambtech-online.co.uk on 23/02/2008

Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk  

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2008\02\22@195327 by James Newton

face picon face
I would like to see clinical studies or other solid proof of this assertion
regarding the behavior of men and women or a retraction of the over
generalization of the gender.

My wife, my daughter, my sister in law and many of my female friends do not
fit that stereotypical description. The person who originally admitted to
(purposely) moving slowly with the payment of cash was, I believe, male.

The PICList is not a place for making unsupported, stereotypical, gender
biased comments.

--
James Newton
PICList admin

{Original Message removed}

2008\02\22@200908 by Jinx

face picon face
> 'hello how are you' in that bored I don't give a f#$%$%%^^$
> about you really tone

Within a km of my suburbian home is just about every outlet I need
to do all my fixin's and whatnot. The suburb is part-commercial,
part-retail and I rarely have to stray far

So I run across the same assistants on a regular basis and like to
make friends. Plus, in my spirit of "Random Acts Of Kindness" I
try to brighten anyone's day at what must often be an I-stayed-at-
school-for-this-? occupation

Unless you are of a certain disposition, it must be tiring and simply
rote to be cheerful to dopey customers all day every day.
Occassionally you come across someone who puts the funk back in
perfunctory

As an example of what > said, I was at the local hardware store's
check-out a few minutes before closing. The young lady, who I know
has a sense of humour, leant into the store PA and said in a 5:30-I-
wanna-go-home voice "Attention customers, the store will be closing
shortly. Thank you for shopping at Mitre 10"

"Ah, you can feel the love-warmth from here" I said to her

She smiled. She knows

Russell & co from NZ might know of a hit-and-run in Matakana
recently. The victim's husband is a very old friend. We emigrated
to NZ together in 1972. So I was visiting her in Ak Hospital
yesterday in the neuro ward and noticed how cheerful her corner
was. Cards, photos and stuffed toys everywhere (she'll be there
for a while in a halo). Also many bright happy helium ballons with
Get Well etc messages. I remarked that there could be a market
for balloons for people you don't like. "No Hurry" "Take Your
Time" "Serves You Right" etc. Other visitors were there with their
gloomy "Oh My God dear"'s. Which is appropriate, but she
probably gets and will get plenty of that over the next few months.
She did get a laugh out through her tracheotomy tube, so stuff
the relatives

2008\02\22@201556 by John Gardner

picon face
Give 'em hell, James.

Or something...

Jack


On 2/22/08, James Newton <KILLspamjamesnewtonKILLspamspammassmind.org> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2008\02\22@203822 by John Gardner

picon face
Godspeed to your injured friend, Joe.

Jack

On 2/22/08, John Gardner <RemoveMEgoflo3TakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

2008\02\22@224236 by Jinx

face picon face
> Godspeed to your injured friend, Joe.

Thank you. I've not been in a hospital for treatment since I was
6 (a couple of stitches after an attack by a vicious apple tree that
resented me climbing it), and not visited anyone in a hospital for
over 30 years. It was quite a profound evening. She's such a nice
person you just want to give her a big hug

No hugs for the a******* who left her banged up in a road-side
ditch all night

I was quite surprised at the electronic wizardy, like the morphine
dispenser, that "I" would have done "that" way. Maybe they're
just old units. There certainly was a lot of hmmming, haa-ing and
head-scratching trying to figure out why it wasn't working properly.
A few other bits of equipment looked like they could do with an
overhaul

2008\02\22@225828 by Peter Todd

picon face
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Hash: SHA1

On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 10:32:05AM +1000, cdb wrote:
> Being well aware that many Australian and others would consider the British shop assistant rude and sullen (though I find being asked how I am and addressed by my first name by someone i don't know, and who doesn't really give a damn (my dear) about me, annoying and obnoxious), I am constantly surprised at how the Australian supermarket shopper is quite content to wait in a large slow moving queue because said shop has only staffed 3 of it's 18 checkouts at peak time, only muttering if the assistant forgets to say 'hello how are you' in that bored I don't give a f#$%$%%^^$ about you really tone. Yet in England there would be shouts and cries from the waiting mob for more tills to be opened - even when all available tills are open.

This is why I tend to do my grocery shopping somewhere between 2am and
5am at the local 24 hour supermarket. Not only are there never any
crowds but they've installed a bunch of automated checkout counters.
Often the person who's supposed to be guarding them to prevent
shoplifting and ring up produce isn't even there, and I manage to do all
my shopping without ever seeing another human being.

I like to call that level of customer service "the future"

- --
http://petertodd.org
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2008\02\22@232227 by Forrest Christian

flavicon
face
Robert Young wrote:
> Obnoxious, but I like to be deliberately slow getting out change when
> I'm paying cash. Usually the clerk gets in a hurry and keys the bill
> amount and just totals out before I ever get out the $0.03 it would
> take to get me back a nice pile of silver. Nothing brings a store to a
> halt faster then watching them try to make change in their heads! :)
What is amazing is how few cashiers can handle the following circumstance:

Total bill:  6.38.  I hand the cashier 21.38.  They look at me like I've
lost my mind - they can't figure out why I'm handing them the "extra
dollar".   Like I said, it's amazing how many cashiers don't get this one.

Even more fun is when the total is something like 5.98 and you had them
$11.03.  (Ten dollar bill, one dollar bill, and those 3 pennies which
are rattling around in your pocket).   Since it involves a carry (or
borrow) or two, I'll give most people some slack on this on.

-forrest

2008\02\23@034129 by Cedric Chang

flavicon
face

{Quote hidden}

Hurrah to both of you !
I am purportedly American.  I give a rat's ass about being cheerily  
greeted by an assistant who gives a rat's arse about how I am  
feeling.  I do care about whether they are competent and empowered to  
solve my issues.  0300 hours is a wonderful time to shop.  My local  
hardware store used to be open at 0300 and I was in heaven when I was  
there at that time.  I love an assistant who "puts one over" on me or  
laughs at my extravagant puns and tries to top them.  If I think they  
are doing it because the company manual says they should, I become a  
clam.

CC

2008\02\23@034628 by Cedric Chang

flavicon
face
I just laughed when I saw those comments and filed it in my "people  
will see
what they want to see" file.  If everyone who made unsupported,  
idiotic statements
was banned, why ...er um ...  cough ....... I might be banned.
CC

{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2008\02\23@035011 by Cedric Chang

flavicon
face
{Quote hidden}

Start    Please....... I want to hear more.....  What does ' Y'er  
Right there' mean ????
CC


2008\02\23@035649 by Cedric Chang

flavicon
face
>
> Russell & co from NZ might know of a hit-and-run in Matakana
> recently. The victim's husband is a very old friend. We emigrated
> to NZ together in 1972. So I was visiting her in Ak Hospital
> yesterday in the neuro ward and noticed how cheerful her corner
> was. Cards, photos and stuffed toys everywhere (she'll be there
> for a while in a halo). Also many bright happy helium ballons with
> Get Well etc messages. I remarked that there could be a market
> for balloons for people you don't like. "No Hurry" "Take Your
> Time" "Serves You Right" etc. Other visitors were there with their
> gloomy "Oh My God dear"'s. Which is appropriate, but she
> probably gets and will get plenty of that over the next few months.
> She did get a laugh out through her tracheotomy tube, so stuff
> the relatives


I love the concept of dreary helium balloons.... yes, I will give it
a shot on eBay.  Thank you for the idea.
CC
( My brother-in-law died from that very same thing .....  I suppose  
it could be worse  ......  I hear that bad luck comes in 3's )


2008\02\23@043601 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Feb 23, 2008, at 12:46 AM, Cedric Chang wrote:

> "people will see what they want to see"

http://xkcd.com/385/

2008\02\23@044458 by Jake Anderson

flavicon
face

>
> Start    Please....... I want to hear more.....  What does ' Y'er  
> Right there' mean ????
> CC
>  
Short for "Are you all right?" meaning would you like service?

2008\02\23@045939 by Dario Greggio

face picon face
Forrest Christian wrote:

> Total bill:  6.38.  I hand the cashier 21.38.  They look at me like I've
> lost my mind - they can't figure out why I'm handing them the "extra
> dollar".   Like I said, it's amazing how many cashiers don't get this one.

Funny, I get this one too :)
I sometimes believe that I'm too deep into mathematic with respect to
common people - maybe.

Another thing that happened to me, and I guess this is something which
happens to italians abroad since we're not much used to tips at the
restaurant (we have Service summed up in the bill), is that I tried
giving those little coins to make the rest a full figure... and I got a
bad look by the waiter...

--
Ciao, Dario

2008\02\23@070655 by Cedric Chang

flavicon
face
>
> On Feb 23, 2008, at 2:35 AM, William Chops Westfield wrote:
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2008, at 12:46 AM, Cedric Chang wrote:
>
>> "people will see what they want to see"
>
> http://xkcd.com/385/


WOW  I suck at getting a joke.
Took me 60 seconds to get it.
CC

2008\02\23@080024 by Tony Smith

flavicon
face
> I would like to see clinical studies or other solid proof of
> this assertion regarding the behavior of men and women or a
> retraction of the over generalization of the gender.
>
> My wife, my daughter, my sister in law and many of my female
> friends do not fit that stereotypical description. The person
> who originally admitted to
> (purposely) moving slowly with the payment of cash was, I
> believe, male.
>
> The PICList is not a place for making unsupported,
> stereotypical, gender biased comments.


Sure it's a generalisation, doesn't mean it doesn't happen.

Whether it's a function of women having a handbag (I don't even have a
wallet) or men wanting to be somewhere else I don't know, it's just
something I've noticed over the years.  There's probably a bit of
confirmation bias in there too, maybe I do need to get a grant for this.

Work in retail, you really notice it then.

Tony

2008\02\23@080129 by Tony Smith

flavicon
face
> >
> > I think anyone doing it for fun should be hoisted on a
> petard. Shopping?
> > Yeah, love it. It's tops, mate.
> >
> > Tony
> >
>
> Go slow, read again and I'll give you a hint.  The problem is
> the clerk being both too quick on the keys and too slow on
> the uptake to make change in their head.  If they would have
> waited the extra 15 seconds the follow-on 3 minute ordeal
> wouldn't happen.
>
> Rob


Go back and read it again.  Take note of the very first word.  He's buying
something for $9.98, and hand over $10.  The cashier rings it up (to avoid
complaints about slow service) and then gets
"............................and here's 3 cents to make your life easier".

Just hand over $10.03.  I do that a lot, I doubt I've ever confused anyone.

The correct cashier response is to hand him back his 3 cents, say "No
thanks, I've got plenty" and give his change in one cent coins as well.  A
good laugh can then be had by all involved.  Beats having people being
condescending to the epsilon minus class working retail.

You can also impress the epsilon minus class by using a $100 bill to buy a
newspaper.  (It screws up your float.)

Yeah, I've worked retail, and done point of sale systems.  Yay for credit
cards.

Tony

2008\02\23@085407 by John Gardner

picon face
> No hugs for the a******* who left her banged up in a road-side
> ditch all night

Sounds familiar.

I got nailed by a multi-tasking (cell phone, burger, kid, dog)
SUV jock a few years ago. In a parking lot.

Broken arm, dislocated shoulder, bent bicycle.

CSI San Diego still hot on her trail, no doubt.

2008\02\23@102731 by Peter Todd

picon face
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On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 11:59:29PM +1100, Tony Smith wrote:
> Go back and read it again.  Take note of the very first word.  He's buying
> something for $9.98, and hand over $10.  The cashier rings it up (to avoid
> complaints about slow service) and then gets
> "............................and here's 3 cents to make your life easier".
>
> Just hand over $10.03.  I do that a lot, I doubt I've ever confused anyone.

My experiences too. It's only when I start to get really creative, like
handing over $10.18 for a $9.93 bill that some cashiers start to trip
up. Usually I just open up my wallet, start digging for change, and they
assume I'm going to give them something exact. With the occasional
"Ooops! Sorry about that." when I've been up too late and screw up.  If
there is a line up I just give them the $10 and let them do their job.

- --
http://petertodd.org
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2008\02\23@105654 by Robert Young

picon face

{Quote hidden}

If in fact it was $10.03 then they would get a ten and wait for the balance (assuming I have a ten and not a twenty, etc).  But if it was $9.57 they still get the ten first and then I pull out change.  Just slow down, don't key the amount until you see I'm done, or at least make an effort to learn how to make change in your head.  Not hard.  There it is, the cashier must PAY ATTENTION to the customer.  I've worked retail.  I paid attention and waited until the customer is finished digging for change.  It isn't hard and only takes a few more seconds.

Perhaps you like carrying around a lot of change or dumping it into a pot at night.  But at some point you still have to deal with the change (paid a $2 parking ticket, yes that cheap at our downtown, in pennies once).  Sometimes it is nice to have fewer bills in the wallet so the trick with giving an extra dollar to get back just a ten and a five somebody mentioned before is also available to me.  Hell, if the line is long enough I can figure the bill in my head and have the total ready.  That isn't hard either.

And I don't use a credit card for small purchases and quite often not at resturants, table service or "pay at the front" types.  They should be happy to see me pay cash because it means they aren't loosing the percentage to the credit card processor.

I have my newspaper delivered, cheaper to buy the subscription and give a good tip.  Which by the way, I was able to do last bill and tip a touch over 15% (they do a very good job of getting within 6 feet of the front door and not in the bushes) and even make the bill round out to a nice even dollar amount.

Rob

2008\02\23@125600 by Tony Smith

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   Obnoxious, but I like to be deliberately slow getting out change...
   ...
   Nothing brings a store to a halt faster... :)

In a supermarket enviroment, speed is the key.  In a smaller shop (or on a
slow day), then yes, the cashier can afford to play games, (or most likely,
tolerate being on the receiving end).

As the saying goes, don't judge people by how they treat you, watch how they
treat the hired staff.

Tony

2008\02\23@173551 by Jinx

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> Perhaps you like carrying around a lot of change or dumping it into
> a pot at night

I don't. Although over recent years the NZ coinage has been simplified
and that helps. The 1c 2c and 5c coins have gone, leaving 10c as the
lowest denomination, the $1 and $2 bills were replaced by small coins

So maths for till staff (and customers who think about these things)
is easier

> You can also impress the epsilon minus class by using a $100 bill to
> buy a newspaper. (It screws up your float.)

I'll let my coin collection get to around $30-$40, usually only $10 of it
on me, then I'll exchange it for notes. Usually at the local pharmacy.
They give out a lot of change for notes on prescriptions and always
appreciate more coins in the till. Or I'll pay $10.90 for a $9.90 item,
=> $10 note + 90c change for a $1 coin

2008\02\23@200039 by Cedric Chang

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I pretty much toss anything but 25 cent pieces and paper money (U.S. )
I use 25 cents in parking meters, I leave any smaller change at the  
register.
I never get 50 cent pieces.
CC

2008\02\26@044740 by Alan B. Pearce

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>My wife, my daughter, my sister in law and many of my female friends
>do not fit that stereotypical description.

My wife does, the security of the credit cards, by the time they are put
away inside about three layers of security in her purse, would rival Fort
Knox ...

2008\02\26@045624 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Often the person who's supposed to be guarding them to prevent
>shoplifting and ring up produce isn't even there, and I manage
>to do all my shopping without ever seeing another human being.
>
>I like to call that level of customer service "the future"

Smile - you're on Candid Camera security footage ;))))

2008\02\26@045629 by Alan B. Pearce

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>> Obnoxious, but I like to be deliberately slow getting out change when
>> I'm paying cash. Usually the clerk gets in a hurry and keys the bill
>> amount and just totals out before I ever get out the $0.03 it would
>> take to get me back a nice pile of silver. Nothing brings a store to a
>> halt faster then watching them try to make change in their heads! :)
>
>What is amazing is how few cashiers can handle the following circumstance:
>
>Total bill:  6.38.  I hand the cashier 21.38.  They look at me like I've
>lost my mind - they can't figure out why I'm handing them the "extra
>dollar".   Like I said, it's amazing how many cashiers don't get this one.
>
>Even more fun is when the total is something like 5.98 and you had them
>$11.03.  (Ten dollar bill, one dollar bill, and those 3 pennies which
>are rattling around in your pocket).   Since it involves a carry (or
>borrow) or two, I'll give most people some slack on this on.

Reminds me of a story my grandfather used to tell, about going into a store
for some clothes pegs. This would have been just before or just after WW2.

Grandfather: I'll have a gross of clothes pegs please.
Dumb assistant: Sorry, we don't have them in a gross, but we do have them in
12 dozen.

Anyone familiar with old weights and measures will know that a gross and 12
dozen are the same quantity. And they say that schooling is going downhill
these days ...

2008\02\26@063949 by Apptech

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> Grandfather: I'll have a gross of clothes pegs please.
> Dumb assistant: Sorry, we don't have them in a gross, but
> we do have them in
> 12 dozen.

When I was doing mechanical practical experience training a
lifetime or 3 ago I reduced a usually competent storeman in
a machine shop helplessness by asking for an eg 12/32nd
inch* drill. (or summat like that). He refused to try and
standardise it and demanded I give it to him as a standard
measure.


       Russell


* May have been 24/64ths.


2008\02\26@161001 by Cedric Chang

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Sorry, you are not as familiar with the old weights and measures as  
you think you are.  A gross is a dozen dozen.  A gross is not 12  
dozen.  Get it right !
cc

2008\02\27@040822 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Sorry, you are not as familiar with the old weights and measures
>as you think you are.  A gross is a dozen dozen.  
>A gross is not 12 dozen.  Get it right !

<VBG> I blame my grandfather for telling the story  ... ;)))

2008\02\27@090736 by Cedric Chang

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>
> On Feb 27, 2008, at 2:07 AM, Alan B. Pearce wrote:
>
>> Sorry, you are not as familiar with the old weights and measures
>> as you think you are.  A gross is a dozen dozen.
>> A gross is not 12 dozen.  Get it right !
>
> <VBG> I blame my grandfather for telling the story  ... ;)))

very good !
cc

2008\02\27@100910 by bill.finkle

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part 1 784 bytes content-type:text/plain; (decoded 7bit)



       Hi

>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Twelve dozen (12 x 12 = 144, the duodecimal 100) are known as a gross; and
twelve gross = 1,728 a great gross,

       Bill F





{Original Message removed}


'[OT] Hoist by my own petard'
2008\03\03@074140 by Jinx
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> I would like to see clinical studies or other solid proof of
> this assertion regarding the behavior of men and women or
> a retraction of the over generalization of the gender

I've asked everyone behind a counter I've come across in the
last week, about a dozen, and they all say, without exception,
that women are generally slower than men at a checkout. There
are individual differences of course. For example a gender who
may be typically a square peg in the store. A woman in a motor
parts store, a man at a cosmetics counter. Either may be held up
because they don't know exactly what they want/need or do
know and can't wait to get out so their money is, and their feet
are, ready

>From what people have told me, and also what I remember from
a TV series called Why We Buy, basically men are not shoppers
the way women are. For men it's business - in/out, on to the next.
For women it's also a social event (very loosely speaking) and they
tend to ponder more

2008\03\23@194156 by Howard Winter

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> >Sorry, you are not as familiar with the old weights and measures
> >as you think you are.  A gross is a dozen dozen.  
> >A gross is not 12 dozen.  Get it right !

When I started working in a Stationary manufaturer, books were sold by the dozen.  This applied even if they were big, and packed in smaller units than 12, so if
you ordered three books, it was shown as 3/12.

Stock levels were recorded in separate columns as: Great Gross / Gross / Dozens / Twelfths.

For those who haven't guessed, a Great Gross is a dozen gross!

Decimalising it was a nightmare...

Cheers,




Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


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