Searching \ for '[OT] Forget planets, how about a *skating* on Mars' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=forget+planets+how
Search entire site for: 'Forget planets, how about a *skating* on Mars'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] Forget planets, how about a *skating* on Mars'
2005\07\30@182151 by Peter

picon face

I can't believe nobody reacted so far. I posted the message below 4
hours ago.

Peter

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2005 21:05:55 +0300 (IDT)
From: Peter <spam_OUTplpTakeThisOuTspamplp.home.org>
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public. <.....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu>
Cc: 'pic microcontroller discussion list' <PICLISTspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu>
Subject: RE: [OT] BREAKING NEWS: Forget planets,
    how about a skating ring the size of a large city on Mars ?


The next Mars rover will be *skating* among dunes ;-)

www.universetoday.com/am/publish/water_ice_in_cater_at_north_pole.html?2872005
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMGKA808BE_0.html

Peter

2005\07\30@184911 by Jinx

face picon face
> I can't believe nobody reacted so far. I posted the message below 4
> hours ago.

Was thinking about getting out of bed at random times to check the
mail but then thought......nah

I like the anaglyph view at ESA. Grabbed my glasses left over from
the 3D episode of 3rd Rock From The Sun. Have great idea for pin-
up calendar

http://www.skyimagelab.com/hapfaconmar.html



2005\07\31@073138 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
Jinx,

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 10:49:07 +1200, Jinx wrote:

> > I can't believe nobody reacted so far. I posted the message below 4
> > hours ago.
>
> Was thinking about getting out of bed at random times to check the
> mail but then thought......nah

Well I was out at a barbecue, trying to cook in between the rain showers... (If you don't like the weather in
England, wait a bit!) so that's my excuse  :-)

> I like the anaglyph view at ESA. Grabbed my glasses left over from
> the 3D episode of 3rd Rock From The Sun. Have great idea for pin-
> up calendar
>
> http://www.skyimagelab.com/hapfaconmar.html

I like this comment: "Conventional wisdom holds that the markings inside the crater are placed by chance by
natural processes."  Oh, rather than that someone on an Ecstasy binge sneaked out to Mars and drew the smiley
face on it...  OK!

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2005\07\31@075203 by Jinx

face picon face
part 1 639 bytes content-type:text/plain; (decoded 7bit)

> > http://www.skyimagelab.com/hapfaconmar.html

I think I did one better than the happy face

This is a portion of M16, "The Pillars Of Creation"

http://www.skyimagelab.com/hubm16pilofc.html

1/4 way down on the left pillar

Could this be the face of  G.. ? Piercing stars for eyes, nose,
chin, moustache, shoulder, with the left cheek in profile

Might be Saddam though, looks like he's wearing a beret

Oooo-er

BTW, I had a quick look around for other 3D images to look
at with red/blue glasses. This'uns pretty good

http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/multimedia/3d/red_blue/3dwall.gif





part 2 2726 bytes content-type:image/jpeg; (decode)


part 3 35 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
(decoded 7bit)


'[OT] Forget planets, how about a *skating* on Mars'
2005\08\01@042151 by Alan B. Pearce
face picon face
>I like this comment: "Conventional wisdom holds that the markings
>inside the crater are placed by chance by natural processes."  
>Oh, rather than that someone on an Ecstasy binge sneaked out to
>Mars and drew the smiley face on it...  OK!

I just thought it was God having a laugh at astronomers expense ;))

2005\08\09@045846 by Jinx

face picon face
> > http://www.skyimagelab.com/hapfaconmar.html
>
> I like this comment: "Conventional wisdom holds that the markings
> inside the crater are placed by chance by natural processes."  Oh,
> rather than that someone on an Ecstasy binge sneaked out to Mars
> and drew the smiley face on it...  OK!

Thnk th sm prsn's bn hr

http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/ugadmit/CG/projects.html

"Surprisingly, the recommended number of letters to be found at
either end of a word is only one"

Whoa, back the truck up, say what ?

2005\08\09@141357 by James Newton, Host

face picon face

Just to be clear: This is a HUGE glacier of ICE (water) on the SURFACE of
the red planet. Not some little bit mixed in with the rocks underground.
Right up there on the surface in living color... And MEGA TONs of it...

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMGKA808BE_0.html

I've been sort of waiting for the news agencies to pick up on this story..
And none of the US ones have...

The BBC reported it
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4727847.stm

As far as I can tell, NBC did not. (closest was a 2004 report about water
under the south pole)

ABC did not report it
<infospace.abcnews.com/_1_JKTURT0GFHKEP__info.abcnws/search/web/mars%
2Bwater-ice%2Bnorth%2Bpole%2Besa >

CNN did not report it
<search.cnn.com/pages/search.jsp?query=mars%20water-ice%20north%20pol
e%20esa >

Frankly, I find that very disappointing. My concern is that it was not
reported because it was the ESA that found it. I hope I'm wrong, but could
it be that this shows a very sad, "not in house" problem on the part of US
news agencies, at a minimum, and perhaps the US people as well? Or is there
some other reason why this is not front page news?

In any case, I'll send my personal congratulations to the ESA for one heck
of an inspiring find. Well done!

As to the importance of the find itself: I would assume this means that
anyone who is willing to send humans to mars would have ready access to
water without having to dig for it.

If the purity of the ice is sufficient, it could also be used as a shield;
allowing light to penetrate to some degree while providing protection from
meteors which the atmosphere would not. Digging out a home under the ice may
well be less expensive and safer than building a dome.

It might be that shaping the outside of the ice could concentrate the
available solar energy and allow for crops or other energy needs deep in the
safety of the ground.

Would the ice also provide protection from radiation?

I really know very little about these issues, but I find it hard to believe
that this news is not one of the most exciting things the human race has
heard in many years.

---
James.



> {Original Message removed}

2005\08\09@162328 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
below

James Newton, Host wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I agree, James. I am very disappointed that US news people fail to see
the significance.
There are so many reasons for elation that there is not enough room on
the list. But the most
significant one is that water is the building block for all living
things and it keeps living things
alive.

{Quote hidden}

It can be heated and allowed to solidify into liveable shapes easily

>It might be that shaping the outside of the ice could concentrate the
>available solar energy and allow for crops or other energy needs deep in the
>safety of the ground.
>
>Would the ice also provide protection from radiation?
>  
>
Of course. Water is the first protective layer in nucelar power plants.

>I really know very little about these issues, but I find it hard to believe
>that this news is not one of the most exciting things the human race has
>heard in many years.
>  
>
Agreed. and I never agree with ANYBODY, normally...

--Bob

>---
>James.
>
>
>
>  
>
>>{Original Message removed}

2005\08\09@174004 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
James,

On Tue, 9 Aug 2005 11:13:43 -0700, James Newton, Host wrote:

>...<
> I've been sort of waiting for the news agencies to pick up on this story..
> And none of the US ones have...

My girlfriend (who lives in New York) reports that events outside the US are often not reported on the big
networks, and she has to rely on BBC World for information on them.  For example, did they report the small
Russian submarine that was nearly lost this week?  The 7 crew were rescued after being stuck on the bottom for
several days, with only about 12hrs of air left.  This time (unlike with the Kursk) the Russian government
asked for help quickly, and the US and UK responded.  In the end a Royal Navy ROV cut away the nets that it
was tangled in, and the sub. surfaced safely yesterday.

I have to say that if they don't report some events at all (those that are important but of foreign and not US
interest), I would be suspicious of the information they do give!  :-)

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2005\08\09@175000 by Mike Hord

picon face
> For example, did they report the small Russian submarine that was
> nearly lost this week?  

I'd heard about it from Google news and certainly on NPR.  But you
are right; one gets an entirely different caliber and content of news
by listening to NPR or BBC World Service (which is carried by my
local NPR affiliate) than one gets from commercial US news
outlets.

I find NPR to be about on par with the World Service in most cases.
The crisis in Sudan was big news on NPR many, many months
before I ever heard it mentioned from any other news source.

Mike H.

2005\08\09@180025 by shb7

flavicon
face
>Just to be clear: This is a HUGE glacier of ICE (water) on the >SURFACE of the red planet. Not some little bit mixed in with the >rocks underground. Right up there on the surface in living color... >And MEGA TONs of it...

I thought that Mars had water ice in its polar ice caps which are cleary visible with an amateur telescope. Am I wrong and they are entirely CO2 ice?

Sean



2005\08\10@013457 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Aug 9, 2005, at 2:40 PM, Howard Winter wrote:

> did they report the small Russian submarine that was nearly lost ?

It was on the radio, at least in the initial stages.  I don't know if
it remained 'newsworthy' after it turned out to be the British who
saved the day :-)  TV news isn't to be trusted, period, IMO.  I mean,
how much news can you show in 30 minutes, anyway?  People who really
want to know what's going on should (and presumably do) read the papers.
The local papers (San Jose Mercury) web site shows 7 stories on the
russian sub, for instance (starting 5-aug, ending 8-aug.)

BillW

2005\08\10@101023 by David Van Horn

picon face


-----Original Message-----
From: .....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam.....mit.edu [EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu] On Behalf
Of William Chops Westfield
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2005 12:44 AM
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
Subject: Re: [OT] Forget planets, how about a *skating* on Mars ? Ice
the size of a small city found in a crater by ESA probe. Greatpictures.

On Aug 9, 2005, at 2:40 PM, Howard Winter wrote:

> did they report the small Russian submarine that was nearly lost ?

It was on the radio, at least in the initial stages

It was in the newspapers here.. You DEFINITELY don't want to be in a
submarine accident long enough for it to make the newspapers!
(kinda reminds me of "Airplane")




2005\08\10@133558 by James Newtons Massmind

face picon face
> The local papers (San Jose Mercury) web site shows 7 stories
> on the Russian sub, for instance (starting 5-aug, ending 8-aug.)
>
> BillW


But any for the water-ice on mars pole surface?

---
James.



2005\08\10@172122 by Peter

picon face

On Tue, 9 Aug 2005, James Newton, Host wrote:

> If the purity of the ice is sufficient, it could also be used as a shield;
> allowing light to penetrate to some degree while providing protection from
> meteors which the atmosphere would not. Digging out a home under the ice may
> well be less expensive and safer than building a dome.

I don't know what your references on this are, but:

1) ice is soft as a material compared to rock/sand. It takes more ice
above one's bunker to protect properly from a given threat than
dirt/earth. Only plus: It stops neutrons more than dirt and may be a
better insulator than rock (but worse than sand or dust).

2) ice a few meters deep is completely opaque, unless it is crystalised.
Most natural ice isn't afaik. Ice made from packed snow is particularly
opaque. One meter of that and you're in the darkroom. There are reports
of people buried in avalanches in broad daylight who could not make out
'up' because it was totally dark only one meter below.

> It might be that shaping the outside of the ice could concentrate the
> available solar energy and allow for crops or other energy needs deep in the
> safety of the ground.
>
> Would the ice also provide protection from radiation?

Yes, but it depends on what is in the ice. For example a radiation
shield made of tritium rich frozen water is not a good idea. Same thing
for inclusions in water, like salts (Chlorine and Iodine).

I have been reading up on these things recently ;-)

So ... according to the following document up to 53% of the polar areas
surface may be water by mass:

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maik/sols/2004/00000038/00000004/00494842

But as to that skating ring, I think that the most interesting thing
would be to drill in it and look for life. If there ever was something
larger than bacteria on Mars then its remains should be found in the
ice. I also think that *skating* (or ice-walking) robots will be a
subject of intense study in the near future.

Peter

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2005 , 2006 only
- Today
- New search...