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'[OT] English name'
1998\07\31@095659 by Nuno Pedrosa

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What do you call "{"?

Brackets are "[", right?
Thanx.
--
   .^.                                              _,^,_         /\
___( | )_____ Nuno Filipe Freitas Pedrosa __________ o(`} | , __/\/ /__
/*\\|//*\    SIEMENS S.A. Portugal                  (]|  /'    \ \/\
\(\\V//)/    spam_OUTNuno.PedrosaTakeThisOuTspamoen.siemens.de     (]|`%   (") \/\ \
 ` -=- '     Tel.  :00351-1-4242454         (")      /`/        / /\/
__B//|\\P___________________________________________\' / `/______\/____
   `-' "Try and leave this world a little better than you found it..."

1998\07\31@100926 by Stuart Allen

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> What do you call "{"?

A brace.

1998\07\31@104921 by Peter L. Peres

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>From another alien:

() = brackets

[] = square brackets

{} = curly brackets

@ = at sign, also represented by making a squiggle w. finger in thin air,
hoping that listener will guess meaning, in other languages. Do not make
this sign near your head, or the interlocutor's head.

& = and sign, represented as above in other languages. The latter 2
symbols are sometimes interchangeable <g>.

~ = tilde. also represented as a squiggle in thin air, but easier to to
differentiate, so it is not interchangeable with the prev. 2

/ = slash, div. sign. Easiliy understood in other languages.

\ = backslash. Easily not understood in other languages.  Represented by a
cutting gesture made in thin air, like a karate blow. Do not represent
this character in public when its interpretation may lead to bloodshed ;)

# = hash sign. Represented easily using a squiggle in thin air.

_ = undersore. This one requires about three *words* in latin languages,
but it is not just a squiggle drawn in thin air. This and the previous
three characters may have dangerous connotations when used in public in
the squiggle form.

^ = caret. Another squiggle-character. Sometimes causes interlocutor to
look up, and to the sides, and then try to figure out what the roof has
got to do with it anyway.

% = percent. Sometimes represented by rubbing the thumb and the index in
an expressive gesture. Well understood everywhere, no mistakes here.

$ = dollar (also, USD).  Represented by the same gesture as above, has
strong misleading connotations when presented to the uninitiated (as in:
URL:  http://www.somewhere.com/cgi-bin/item$price$usd$103556789).

` = back-tick. Often represented by a squiggle in thin air. Often removed
from unclear print-outs with Tip-Ex by University secretaries as a
printer-caused dot, before multiplication with a copier, which causes no
end to the joy of UNIX shell programming students, and others.

hoping not to bore you,

       Peter

1998\07\31@112648 by Andy Kunz

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At 05:21 PM 7/31/98 +0000, you wrote:
>>From another alien:
>
>() = brackets

NO!  These are parens, or parentheses.

>[] = square brackets

THESE are brackets.

>{} = curly brackets

or braces.

Note that for all the above, the left character (, [, or { is the "open"
and the right side ), ], or } is the "close."

># = hash sign. Represented easily using a squiggle in thin air.

or pound sign.

>$ = dollar (also, USD).  Represented by the same gesture as above, has

or currency.

Some more:

! = bang

* = splat

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\07\31@114330 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
The trick is that a large part of the previous email reflects long years
of observing non-english speaking people (even engineers) trading URLs w/o
electronic tools nearby (as in spell URL over radio/phone. Did you notice
early MTV at-signs represented as squiggles drawn in thin air in front of
the pretty announcer's front middle body section <g> ?) (this was a few
years ago anyway).

Peter

1998\07\31@114644 by Chuck Adams

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# = Octothorpe

Chuck Adams  K5FO  Dallas,TX         CP-60
http://reality.sgi.com/adams .....adamsKILLspamspam@spam@sgi.com

1998\07\31@115910 by Ake Hedman

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A "curly brace".

/Ake

{Quote hidden}

1998\07\31@150353 by Leon Heller

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In message <35C1D946.50B8spamspam_OUToen.siemens.de>, Nuno Pedrosa
<@spam@nuno.pedrosaKILLspamspamOEN.SIEMENS.DE> writes
>What do you call "{"?

I call it a brace, or a "curly" bracket. Brace is the term used by
printers, according to my dictionary.

>
>Brackets are "[", right?

I'd call that a square bracket.

A bracket is any mark of this type used in pairs, like parentheses and
braces.

Leon
--
Leon Heller: KILLspamleonKILLspamspamlfheller.demon.co.uk http://www.lfheller.demon.co.uk
Amateur Radio Callsign G1HSM    Tel: +44 (0) 118 947 1424
See http://www.lfheller.demon.co.uk/dds.htm for details of a simple AD9850
DDS system. See " "/diy_dsp.htm for a simple DIY DSP ADSP-2104 system.


'[OT] English name'
1998\08\01@031134 by Steve Smith
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In a message dated 31/07/98  19:09:23, you write:

<< Brace is the term used by
printers >>
I thaught that these were the dentists tourture implements !!! (BANG BANG
BANG)

Steve.....

1998\08\01@040155 by paulb

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Peter L. Peres wrote:

> \ = backslash.

 A common shorthand, especially so as I am given to understand amongst
UNIX people, is "slosh".

> _ = undersore.

 Just so no-one is confused, it is actually "underscore", might also be
called "underline" as this was its chief purpose on printers.  (Carriage
return *without* linefeed then print these under the previously typed
words).

> URL:  http://www.somewhere.com/cgi-bin/item$price$usd$103556789).

 Not found.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\08\02@191149 by Tony Nixon

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What do you call "{ 1"



A Brace and Bit :-)


Sorry, it's Monday morning.
--
Best regards

Tony

Multimedia 16F84 Beginners PIC Tools.
**New PicNPrac**

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email RemoveMEpicnpokeTakeThisOuTspamcdi.com.au


'[OT] English name'
1998\09\04@125043 by Paul BRITTON
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In the days of the BBC micro, the '#' hash synbol was called a 'gate' by
the BBC, and it's also called that in my company phone users guide.

1998\09\04@135352 by myke predko

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Paul Britton wrote:
>In the days of the BBC micro, the '#' hash synbol was called a 'gate' by
>the BBC, and it's also called that in my company phone users guide.

The correct name seems to be "octothorpe" and it's a wonderful tool to guage
people.

I have found that 100% of the people that call it an "octothorpe" are no fun
at parties and when you meet them for the first time, chances are they're
wearing a bowtie, irregardless of the weather or situation.


I hope everyone has a great (and safe) labour day!

myke

Check out the "Handbook of Microcontrollers" as a reference for embedded
microcontrollers including information on the Intel 8051, Motorola 68HC05,
Microchip PICMicro, Atmel AVR and Parallax Basic Stamp:

http://www.myke.com/#MCUHand


Hunter S. Thompson's quest for the American Dream, this week in the Book Room.

http://www.myke.com/Book_Room/book1a.htm

1998\09\04@144738 by 'Grif' w. keith griffith

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At 01:51 PM 9/4/98 -0400, you wrote:
>Paul Britton wrote:
>>In the days of the BBC micro, the '#' hash synbol was called a 'gate' by
>>the BBC, and it's also called that in my company phone users guide.
>
>The correct name seems to be "octothorpe" and it's a wonderful tool to guage
>people.
>
>I have found that 100% of the people that call it an "octothorpe" are no fun
>at parties and when you meet them for the first time, chances are they're
>wearing a bowtie, irregardless of the weather or situation.

Whew,,, And I make fun of the vocabulary of my co-workers,,, I don't think
I know anybody who even knows the word, let alone use it.  I'll be getting
some mileage out of this one!  Oh,,, in the world of Data General it was a
"crunch"
>
>
>



'Grif' N7IVS

1998\09\04@145549 by Nuno Filipe Pedrosa

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Never thought that "#" could have so many names!
Here, in Portugal (all of it, I think) we call it a "cardinal".
Like in #1 (cardinal/number 1) #2 (cardinal/number 2).
And, no, cardinal has nothing to do with religion. 8)
What, in english, you call a Cardinal, we call "Cardeal".

Bye.

   .^.                                              _,^,_         /\
___( | )_____ Nuno Filipe Freitas Pedrosa __________ o(`} | , __/\/ /__
/*\\|//*\    SIEMENS S.A. Portugal                  (]|  /'    \ \/\
\(\\V//)/    spamBeGonenffpspamBeGonespamdione.ist.utl.pt           (]|`%   (") \/\ \
 ` -=- '     Tel.  :00351-1-841826          (")      /`/        / /\/
__B//|\\P___________________________________________\' / `/______\/____
   `-' "Try and leave this world a little better than you found it..."


On Fri, 4 Sep 1998, 'Grif' w. keith griffith wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\09\04@152506 by Andy Kunz

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>What, in english, you call a Cardinal, we call "Cardeal".

We call that a "rip-off" here <G>.  Usually these have adjectives like
"fantastic" "no money down" "too good to be true" <Boy, is that a warning!>

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\09\04@155847 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
MIT's jagon dictionary suggests "splat" for "#"...
Also "!" = "bang", "<>" = "brockets" (Broken Brackets), "^" = "hat", etc.
All generally intended for quick and clear verbal communication:
"my email address is ess-are-eye-bang-em-ee-atsign-openbrocket-eff-oh-oh-
closebrocket"

BillW

1998\09\04@170458 by Pete Klammer

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We once had a complete list of one-syllable names for every ASCII
graphic,
something like:
!=bang
@=at
#=pound
%=ummm... I don't remember that one now
^=hat
*=star
(=open (okay, that's two syllables, but it's real short)
)=close
-=dash
/=slash
\=slide
<=less
>=more
... and so forth ...

I would love to learn the names for "@" in other languages!
This summer a German from Hanover in Estonia on his way to Finland
by bicycle told me that his name for "@" is "klammeraffe".
This interested me because my name is Klammer. In German:
klammer=clamp,clip,grip,etc.
affe=ape
Hence, the "@" is a little picture of a baby monkey gripping its mother.
(Any German on the list care to confirm or debunk this?)

In Estonia (where there are now "@" road signs directing you to
so-equipped public libraries), I think they told me the the word
for "@" was "kassisaba".  In Estonian,
kass=cat
saba=tail
Hence, the "@" is a picture of a cat's tail (encircling what?).
Antti, can you amplify or dispel this?

Peter F. Klammer / TakeThisOuTPKlammerEraseMEspamspam_OUTRacom.com
Racom Systems, Inc. / 6080 Greenwood Plaza Blvd / Englewood CO 80111
(303)773-7411 / FAX:(303)771-4708


> {Original Message removed}

1998\09\04@171909 by 'Grif' w. keith griffith

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Bill,,, Oh, and is this 'sir chopsalot'?  It just seems I lurk on several
lists your name shows up on.  Maby even Stay Green?

anyway
if # is a splat,,, what's a *?
One of the books I've seen was something like hook, bang, crunch and splat
for a title.  No memory past that.

At 12:58 PM 9/4/98 PDT, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

'Grif' N7IVS

1998\09\05@021829 by netquake

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----------
>
> Paul Britton wrote:
> >In the days of the BBC micro, the '#' hash synbol was called a 'gate' by
> >the BBC, and it's also called that in my company phone users guide.
>
> The correct name seems to be "octothorpe" and it's a wonderful tool to
guage
> people.
>
> I have found that 100% of the people that call it an "octothorpe" are no
fun
> at parties and when you meet them for the first time, chances are they're
> wearing a bowtie, irregardless of the weather or situation.

I call it Tic Tac Joe!

P.D: Anyone knows how to recognize a screwed-up 16F84 from a
good one without a programmer or expensive gear?

1998\09\05@052720 by Stig Brautaset

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In Norway, by some people, the @ sign is called a "snabel-a". Snabel means a
trunk (as an elephant's nose).

Also, it is called a "kr¿ll-alfa" (that first word contais a norwegian
letter that may not appear amongst the majoroty of you, it is an "o" with a
slash across it.) It means "curl". "Alfa" I'm sure needs no explanation.



>I would love to learn the names for "@" in other languages!
>
>Peter F. Klammer / RemoveMEPKlammerspamTakeThisOuTRacom.com
>Racom Systems, Inc. / 6080 Greenwood Plaza Blvd / Englewood CO 80111
>(303)773-7411 / FAX:(303)771-4708
>
>

1998\09\05@052729 by Stig Brautaset

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-----Original Message-----
From: 'Grif' w. keith griffith <kgriffitEraseMEspam.....WOLFENET.COM>
To: EraseMEPICLISTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <RemoveMEPICLISTEraseMEspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: 4. september 1998 23:16
Subject: Re: [OT] English name


>Bill,,, Oh, and is this 'sir chopsalot'?  It just seems I lurk on several
>lists your name shows up on.  Maby even Stay Green?
>
>anyway
>if # is a splat,,, what's a *?




The * (multplicator sign) is called an asterix here in Norway.

Stig

===============================
Stig Brautaset
RemoveMEsbrautasspam_OUTspamKILLspamc2i.net
http://home.c2i.net/sbrautas
===============================
Drive carefully; 90% of the people in the world are caused by accidents.

1998\09\05@055644 by Stig Brautaset

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>
>
>The * (multplicator sign) is called an asterix here in Norway.
>

Actually, when i think about it, I belive it is "asterisk". Not sure, but
something down that road. Can anyone confirm this?


>Stig
>
>===============================
>Stig Brautaset
>RemoveMEsbrautasTakeThisOuTspamspamc2i.net
>http://home.c2i.net/sbrautas
>===============================
>Drive carefully; 90% of the people in the world are caused by accidents.
>

1998\09\05@095344 by Russell McMahon

picon face
If you are, unlike myke ;-), into octothorpes and their ilk then you
could subscribe to "A Word A Day". Each day you get a free new shiny
word such as octothorpe to keep you amused or bemused.

To subscribe:

http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/

Wish to share your love of words with a family member or a friend?
You can
send a gift subscription of AWAD at
http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/gift.html .
Before you sign-up anyone, please make sure s/he will appreciate your
gesture.




{Original Message removed}

1998\09\05@124926 by Ansel Sermersheim

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>>>>> "Stig" == Stig Brautaset <EraseMEsbrautasspamspamspamBeGoneC2I.NET> writes:

>>
>>
>> The * (multplicator sign) is called an asterix here in Norway.
>>

> Actually, when i think about it, I belive it is "asterisk". Not
> sure, but something down that road. Can anyone confirm this?

That's what I call it.

Other fun definitions:

# Octothorpe
= Quadrathorpe
- Bithorpe


Had to get out TNHD for these; it's been a while:

% mod; grapes; double-oh-seven.
\ Backslash; reverse slash; slosh; backslant; backwhack.

--
I used to be convinced that MicroSquish shipped crap because they simply
didn't give a flying fuck as long as the sheep kept buying their shit.
Now, I'm convinced that they really do ship the best products they are
capable of writing, and *that's* tragic.
  - John C. Randolph, about MS quality control.

1998\09\05@153135 by Quentin

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Stig Brautaset wrote:

>
> Actually, when i think about it, I belive it is "asterisk". Not sure, but
> something down that road. Can anyone confirm this?
>
> >Stig

It is asterisk. Astrix is that little guy the carries big stones and smash
up Romans.

Quentin

1998\09\05@154213 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sat, 5 Sep 1998, Ansel Sermersheim wrote:

> # Octothorpe
> = Quadrathorpe
> - Bithorpe

Just out of curiosity, what connotations does the 'thorpe' root have, that
it got to have such immortalizing uses ?

Peter

1998\09\05@175817 by Ansel Sermersheim

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>>>>> "Peter" == Peter L Peres <RemoveMEplpKILLspamspamACTCOM.CO.IL> writes:

> On Sat, 5 Sep 1998, Ansel Sermersheim wrote:
>> # Octothorpe
>> = Quadrathorpe
>> - Bithorpe

> Just out of curiosity, what connotations does the 'thorpe' root
> have, that it got to have such immortalizing uses ?

I'd never thought about it before, but after this message, I decided
to look for more info.

http://www.nynews.com/topics/bpa60503.htm
explained quite a bit.

Quoted from the site:

"A fine word and yet obscure.

The Alta Vista search engine claims an index of 11 billion words on 22
million Web pages. But a search for octothorp found it on only 24 of
all those pages, and some of the cites were duplicated sites.

In addition to your pound and Michael's hash, the Web provided other
octothorp alternatives, including: number, grid, hatch, crosshatch,
tictactoe, mesh, thud, thump and pigpen.

I also encountered possible derivation for the word octothorp,
attributed to one Charles Bigelow. The "octo" part is easy. As for the
hard part, and without detailing the etymological detours, the old
English thorp can be traced back to the old Latin "trabs," meaning
beam.

Take a look at the pigpen above the No. 3 on your keyboard. It has
eight points, or eight projecting beams, or eight thorps."

Given all that, it's the work of but a moment to generalise to the
proper other terms, though I realise now that = and - should be
bithorpe and unithorpe, respectively.

-Ansel
--
I used to be convinced that MicroSquish shipped crap because they simply
didn't give a flying fuck as long as the sheep kept buying their shit.
Now, I'm convinced that they really do ship the best products they are
capable of writing, and *that's* tragic.
  - John C. Randolph, about MS quality control.

1998\09\06@031541 by Russell McMahon

picon face
Asterix is (was?) a Gaul.



-----Original Message-----
From: Stig Brautaset <sbrautasSTOPspamspamspam_OUTC2I.NET>
To: spamBeGonePICLISTSTOPspamspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU <KILLspamPICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Saturday, September 05, 1998 9:56 PM
Subject: Re: [OT] English name


>>
>>
>>The * (multplicator sign) is called an asterix here in Norway.
>>
>
>Actually, when i think about it, I belive it is "asterisk". Not
sure, but
{Quote hidden}

accidents.
>>
>

1998\09\06@174106 by Dwayne Reid

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>MIT's jagon dictionary suggests "splat" for "#"...
>Also "!" = "bang", "<>" = "brockets" (Broken Brackets), "^" = "hat", etc.
>All generally intended for quick and clear verbal communication:
>"my email address is ess-are-eye-bang-em-ee-atsign-openbrocket-eff-oh-oh-
>closebrocket"

The prof that I work with on some DSP stuff agrees with you on all of the
above EXCEPT that splat = "*".  In his words, "think of a bug on a
windshield".  I didn't think to ask him what "#" was called.

dwayne




Dwayne Reid   <@spam@dwayner@spam@spamspam_OUTplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(403) 489-3199 voice     (403) 487-6397 fax

1998\09\07@043214 by Frank A. Vorstenbosch

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Quentin wrote:
>
> > Actually, when i think about it, I belive it is "asterisk". Not sure, but
> > something down that road. Can anyone confirm this?
>
> It is asterisk. Astrix is that little guy the carries big stones and smash
> up Romans.

Err, it's Obelix who carries big stones about.  He's the big fellow, and
Asterix is his clever friend.

Frank
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Frank A. Vorstenbosch     <SPAM_ACCEPT="NONE">    Phone: 0181 - 636 3000
Electronics and Software Engineer                 Mobile: 0976 - 430 569
Eidos Technologies Ltd., Wimbledon, London        Email: spamBeGonefavspamKILLspameidos.co.uk

1998\09\07@051408 by org Hager

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On Fri, 4 Sep 1998, Pete Klammer wrote:

> This summer a German from Hanover in Estonia on his way to Finland
> by bicycle told me that his name for "@" is "klammeraffe".
> This interested me because my name is Klammer. In German:
>  klammer=clamp,clip,grip,etc.
>  affe=ape
> Hence, the "@" is a little picture of a baby monkey gripping its mother.
> (Any German on the list care to confirm or debunk this?)

Yes, that's correct, although many people also call it `at' now even in
Germany.

Georg.

1998\09\07@051824 by Dr. Imre Bartfai

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Only for fun,

the official name of '#' in Hungary means: Andrew's Cross

Imre

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