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'[OT] Dihydrogen monoxyde and other toxins (was Re:'
2009\01\27@143458 by Vitaliy

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"Peter" wrote:
> PS2: Wrt toxicity and MSDS - compare the msds sheets of NaCl and FeCl3 :)
> :)
> (hint: salt is to be kept 'locked up' and is 'mutagenic to mammalian
> somatic
> cells' - the other ingredient of the solution is dihydorgen monoxyde, also
> dangerous when ingested in large quantities or inhaled)


Allegedly, OSHA regulations mandated one company to post a conspicuous
"POISON" sign on a shed that was full of bags containing a known carcinogen
(silicon dioxide, aka "sand").

>From "The Death of Common Sense":

http://tinyurl.com/247nvd

2009\01\27@153302 by Paul Hutchinson

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"Peter" wrote:
> PS2: Wrt toxicity and MSDS - compare the msds sheets of NaCl
> and FeCl3 :)

I did and other than the flammability rating they are NOT similar!

For those not familiar with reading MSDSs, the ratings scale is 0 to 4.
http://www.ilpi.com/msds/ref/nfpa.html

FeCl3 MSDS www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/f1060.htm
Health Rating: 3 - Severe (Life)
Flammability Rating: 0 - None
Reactivity Rating: 2 - Moderate
Contact Rating: 3 - Severe (Corrosive)
Lab Protective Equip: GOGGLES & SHIELD; LAB COAT & APRON; VENT HOOD; PROPER
GLOVES
Storage Color Code: White (Corrosive)

NaCl MSDS www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/S3338.htm
Health Rating: 1 - Slight
Flammability Rating: 0 - None
Reactivity Rating: 0 - None
Contact Rating: 1 - Slight
Lab Protective Equip: GOGGLES; LAB COAT; PROPER GLOVES
Storage Color Code: Green (General Storage)

You should actually read the documents before you make claims about the
contents of the documents.

Paul

2009\01\27@153401 by solarwind

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On Tue, Jan 27, 2009 at 2:33 PM, Vitaliy <spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTspammaksimov.org> wrote:
> "Peter" wrote:
>> PS2: Wrt toxicity and MSDS - compare the msds sheets of NaCl and FeCl3 :)
>> :)
>> (hint: salt is to be kept 'locked up' and is 'mutagenic to mammalian
>> somatic
>> cells' - the other ingredient of the solution is dihydorgen monoxyde, also
>> dangerous when ingested in large quantities or inhaled)
>
>
> Allegedly, OSHA regulations mandated one company to post a conspicuous
> "POISON" sign on a shed that was full of bags containing a known carcinogen
> (silicon dioxide, aka "sand").
>
> >From "The Death of Common Sense":
>
> http://tinyurl.com/247nvd

Lol, now that you mentioned it, I read something a long time ago where
someone scared a bunch of people by writing an article on the dangers
of dihydrogen monoxide. Of course - that only works if your audience
doesn't know very basic chemistry.

--
solarwind

2009\01\27@154458 by Vitaliy

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"Paul Hutchinson" wrote:
> FeCl3
> [...]
> Lab Protective Equip: GOGGLES & SHIELD; LAB COAT & APRON; VENT HOOD;
> PROPER
> GLOVES

Oops...

2009\01\27@170758 by Eoin Ross

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I have GOT to step in on this one.... water IS toxic.

The other half works in a tissue bank, making phone calls to the next of kin.

She had a recent case where the guy died from 'Psychogenic polydipsia'

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Psychogenic-polydipsia
Psychogenic polydipsia is a type of polydypsia with described in patients with
mental illnesses and/or the developmentally disabled. It is present in a subset
of schizophrenics. These patients, most often chronic schizophrenics with a
long history of illness, often exhibit enlarged ventricles and shrunken cortex
on MRI, making the physiological mechanism difficult to isolate from the psychogenic.
It is a serious disorder and often leads to institutionalization as it can be very difficult
to manage outside the inpatient setting. It should be taken very seriously - it can be
life threatening as serum sodium is diluted to an extent that seizures and cardiac arrest
can occur. Patients have been known to seek fluids from any source possible.

To borrow from CBC's Late show ....  'I KNOW!!!'

>>> solarwind <.....x.solarwind.xKILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> 27 Jan 09 15:33:36 >>>
On Tue, Jan 27, 2009 at 2:33 PM, Vitaliy <spamspamKILLspammaksimov.org> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Lol, now that you mentioned it, I read something a long time ago where
someone scared a bunch of people by writing an article on the dangers
of dihydrogen monoxide. Of course - that only works if your audience
doesn't know very basic chemistry.

--
solarwind

2009\01\27@171030 by Peter

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Paul Hutchinson <paullhutchinson <at> yahoo.com> writes:
> You should actually read the documents before you make claims about the
> contents of the documents.

I am free to joke about whatever I like, and I did read the documents. The
likelihood of getting some tiny grains of rock salt into your eyes is much
greater than doing the same with FeCl3, and I assure you it is not pleasant and
takes days to heal.

As I wrote before, FeCl3 is used in industrial quantities in water treatment
plants, the EPA recommends its use for that purpose in the US.

Peter


2009\01\27@171526 by Peter
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solarwind <x.solarwind.x <at> gmail.com> writes:
> of dihydrogen monoxide. Of course - that only works if your audience
> doesn't know very basic chemistry.

It also works if whoever preaches it owns a bar or a pub. That MSDS should be
framed and displayed prominently to patrons ...

Peter


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