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'[OT] Dell power supplies redux . . .'
2006\01\12@193334 by John Nall

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A couple of weeks or so ago I posted a tale of woe regarding the
insufficiency of Dell power supplies these days.  In particular, the
power supply on my Dell Dimension 4700 rolled over and died very quickly
after I added an extra SATA disk to it.  In all fairness to Dell, I have
absolutely no doubt that the power supply that came with the system
would have run it OK as configured, but it apparently did not have much
of a margin and the extra disk drive was too much.  OK -- my problem. I
accept that.

However, I wanted to follow up on  that note and say  that I Googled
around and found that an outfit called "PC-Power and Cooling" which
apparently has found a niche in the market (capitalism is a wonderful
thing, so long as you have boat which will rise with the tide -- people
without boats most likely drown) and sells Dell-specific power supplies
which have extra capacity and will support those extra bells and
whistles that  those of us who were "born to tinker" love to add.  Their
power supply, which is specific to my computer, arrived today, and
worked fine.

So this is just a FYI message.  Hopefully someone, somewhere, will be
helped by it.  :-)

John


2006\01\12@202922 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Jan 12, 2006, at 4:33 PM, John Nall wrote:

> In particular, the power supply on my Dell Dimension 4700 rolled
> over and died very quickly after I added an extra SATA disk to it.
> In all fairness to Dell, I have absolutely no doubt that the
> power supply that came with the system would have run it OK as
> configured, but it apparently did not have much of a margin and
> the extra disk drive was too much.

IMO, the power supply provided with a system ought to be sufficient
to have you fill all the available bays in the box, and all the
connectors on the power supply.  Unless your upgrade involved
"Y cables" and add-on mounting brackets (or dangling drives), it
should have worked.

Furthermore, a power supply ought to react better to an overload
than just burning out.

Perhaps one of these would be useful:
http://www.weaknees.com/powertrip.php
It's a gadget designed to prevent the hard drives from powering
up all at the same time on boxes with limited power supplies.

BillW

2006\01\12@204543 by John Nall

picon face
William Chops Westfield wrote:
> > IMO, the power supply provided with a system ought to be sufficient
> to have you fill all the available bays in the box, and all the
> connectors on the power supply.  Unless your upgrade involved
> "Y cables" and add-on mounting brackets (or dangling drives), it
> should have worked.
>  
.
Yes, well, I happen to agree with you!  :-)  I added a 160GB SATA
harddisk drive, is what I added.  I think  that the power supply that
came with the system should have supported it.  It did not.  That is  
the entire reason for the original posting, which was essentially a
gripe that Dell is shaving their margin.  I have used Dell equipment
since  they started, and never had a problem with adding stuff before now.
.

> > Furthermore, a power supply ought to react better to an overload
> than just burning out.
>  
.
The next step will be to take  the old power supply apart and see if I
can figure out what went wrong.
.

LTA, BJ

2006\01\12@205619 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Jan 12, 2006, at 5:45 PM, John Nall wrote:

> I think  that the power supply that came with the system
> should have supported it.  It did not.

But we don't actually know whether the power supply was SUPPOSED
to have supported it.  Maybe you just had a damaged supply from
the start, and adding the drive was the last straw.

BillW

2006\01\13@135712 by Peter
picon face


On Thu, 12 Jan 2006, William Chops Westfield wrote:

{Quote hidden}

That is sequencing and is not needed on SCSI disks (can set the delayed
spinup jumper and it will spin up when accessed by the OS, which can
be don in sequence).

The problem with modern boxes is, imho, people don't realize that a
750Watt PSU means that the box tries to be a 750Watt space heater, but
it is not as rugged. The usual fans mounted in such a box are nowhere
near what's needed to harness such power.

In general, imho, power and its handling does not scale nicely. You
can't just put in a double sized CPU, double all the fans, and be ok.
The box begins to be a limit in itself, the room or cupboard where the
computer lives is a limit too etc. Usually users are unaware of this and
just keep adding features. Not so good imho. (and they never listen to
technicians who tell them to do some background reasing and also upgrade
the box and pay some attention to installation).

Peter

2006\01\13@144927 by David VanHorn

picon face
>
>
> The problem with modern boxes is, imho, people don't realize that a
> 750Watt PSU means that the box tries to be a 750Watt space heater, but
> it is not as rugged. The usual fans mounted in such a box are nowhere
> near what's needed to harness such power.


When I worked in a bedroom, I ran air conditioning 10 months out of the
year, even while the rest of the house was on heat.

My latest PC is a Lan-Li/Koolance hybrid, with actual thermal design, and
the whole thing is aluminum panels and lots of holes for air.  CPU idles at
about 70-80F, hard drives at 90-ish

PSU exhausts a fair amount of heat, and the fan is set up to blow OUT. :)
It even came that way!

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