Searching \ for '[OT] Cutting PCB' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/pcbs.htm?key=pcb
Search entire site for: 'Cutting PCB'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] Cutting PCB'
2005\11\28@025449 by Lee McLaren

flavicon
face
Hi,

Can anyone suggest a good way to cut fiberglass printed circuit board, I
currently use the old score with a Stanley knife but its very slow and I
am concerned that when I bend the pcb to break it off that the pcb is
getting bent slightly forever.
I have tried an electric tile cutter which looks like a saw blade
without teeth which is coated with something hard like diamonds, it work
ok but is slow and creates a lot of dust.


regards

Lee McLaren

2005\11\28@034001 by Richard Prosser

picon face
Guillotine
RP

On 27/11/05, Lee McLaren <spam_OUTlmclarenTakeThisOuTspamtasnet.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2005\11\28@035638 by Jinx

face picon face
Fretsaw / scroll saw (like a Dremel, turn up cheap on eBay)

http://au.dremel.com/productdisplay/tool_template2.asp?SKU=1680

or bandsaw

2005\11\28@043650 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> Guillotine

Which is what PCB houses tend to use.

2005\11\28@053255 by Lee McLaren

flavicon
face
I probably should have said "cheap (sub $100AUD) way of cutting pcb.

The larger guillotine's do a great job but are over $1000, is anyone
having luck with a cheaper paper guillotine?


regards

Lee McLaren


Russell McMahon wrote:
>> Guillotine
>
> Which is what PCB houses tend to use.
>

2005\11\28@060204 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> The larger guillotine's do a great job but are over $1000, is anyone
> having luck with a cheaper paper guillotine?

I get myself a metal cutter, the type with a 1 meter arm, IIRC it was ~
$100. It works well, but I have not used it much because I mostly use
Olimex :)

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2005\11\28@060636 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Lee McLaren wrote:
>I probably should have said "cheap (sub $100AUD) way of cutting pcb.
>
> The larger guillotine's do a great job but are over $1000, is anyone
> having luck with a cheaper paper guillotine?

A $30USD paper trimmer worked fine for me. In fact, I was surprised at how
well it worked -- it felt like cutting cardboard.

I use this one: http://tinyurl.com/95f8w

Best regards,

Vitaliy

2005\11\28@075356 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
Lee,

On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 18:54:15 +1100, Lee McLaren wrote:

> I have tried an electric tile cutter which looks like a saw blade
> without teeth which is coated with something hard like diamonds, it work
> ok but is slow and creates a lot of dust.

So much like them, that they *are* diamonds!  :-)  Don't breathe that dust - glass dust is really abrasive and
will do your insides no good at all.

If you're doing the score-and-snap trick, clamp the good half (or the smaller, if they're both good) between
flat jaws, about a couple of mm from the score line.  This helps prevent damage or bending.  And if there is
any copper crossing the break-line, cut all the way through it before trying to snap, otherwise it may try to
peel away from the board on one side or other.

Rather than use a Stanley knife ("Box cutter" for the left-ponders) the Olfa P-800 is much better - it's
designed for scoring rather then cutting, and I get much better results and less scary slips with this!  The
only problem is finding someone who sells them...

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2005\11\28@084853 by John J. McDonough

flavicon
face
I got the small brake and shear from Northern Tool -- I think it was under
$100.  I don't do a lot of metal bending, althought that's one of those
things I want to do more when I get the time (ha) but it is the perfect
thing for cutting circuit board.  The only issue with the little one is that
it is fairly small.  Once in a while I need to take a large sheet down with
a tin snips first, then do the shear to clean it up.  But mostly, it is the
right tool for the job.

I'd actually go out and buy a bigger one (I think they have a fairly large
shear for around $300), but I have no idea where I'd put the thing!

I have no idea who a down under equivalent of Northern would be.  These
things are heavy and I suspect that shipping to .au would cost more than the
shear.  But I think there is someone ... seems like when I was looking for
mine I found a much nicer one at some Australian supplier, but the shipping
made it unreasonable.

--McD

{Original Message removed}

2005\11\28@102115 by R. I. Nelson

picon face
part 0 44 bytes
his is a multi-part message in MIME format.
part 1 1226 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed (decoded 7bit)

You might want to look into a vinyl tile cutter such as this one.
http://cgi.ebay.com/CRAIN-CUTTER-VINYL-TILE-CUTTER-MODEL-A-IN-CASE_W0QQitemZ7565608948QQcategoryZ20790QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

I have one made by adifferent manufacturer.  It cut a  peice of pc board
double side 6" long.  I do not think it would cut one the  full width of
12"  but then I only paid $1 USD
for it a te a rummage sale. And then about an hour to clean the
oxidation (Cast aluminum frame) off it.

Richard Prosser wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>>-

2005\11\28@125248 by Padu

picon face
From: "Lee McLaren" <lmclarenspamKILLspamtasnet.net>


> Hi,
>
> Can anyone suggest a good way to cut fiberglass printed circuit board, I
> currently use the old score with a Stanley knife but its very slow and I
> am concerned that when I bend the pcb to break it off that the pcb is
> getting bent slightly forever.
> I have tried an electric tile cutter which looks like a saw blade without
> teeth which is coated with something hard like diamonds, it work ok but is
> slow and creates a lot of dust.
>
>
> regards
>
> Lee McLaren
>


I'm using a regular jig saw upside down. I lock its handle with a vise and
turn it on. My saw has an ON lock, but you could use a piece of wire to keep
it on without you having to keep pressing it, then I just slide the pcb to
make the cut, similar to operating a band saw. I'm using a medium steel
blade, cuts are perfect.

Padu

2005\11\28@131617 by Danny Sauer

flavicon
face
Padu wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] Cutting PCB' on Mon, Nov 28 at 11:59:
> I'm using a regular jig saw upside down. I lock its handle with a vise and
> turn it on. My saw has an ON lock, but you could use a piece of wire to
> keep it on without you having to keep pressing it, then I just slide the
> pcb to make the cut, similar to operating a band saw. I'm using a medium
> steel blade, cuts are perfect.

That gets the award for "most dangerous-sounding method which I've
considered attempting myself" - and possibly "most likely to result in
loss of blood". :)

I have a benchtop bandsaw (woodcutting) which I got for free from a
relative, but I don't use it.  Next time you find yourself passing
through central IL, contact me.  You can have it.  It looks good
sitting in a corner of my garage, but I'd much rather see it
preventing you from clamping an upside-down running jigsaw in a vice
again. :)

I won't mention how I built a "table saw" out of a circular saw, a 4' x
4' sheet of plywood, two sawhorses, and some zip ties.  That'd take
most of my safety inspector credibility away...

--Danny

2005\11\28@134108 by Padu

picon face
From: "Danny Sauer" <.....piclistKILLspamspam.....dannysauer.com>


{Quote hidden}

And that wasn't my original idea. I saw it in one of the "how to make your
own pcb's" website. I do wear safety glasses though 8^D

Padu

2005\11\28@140916 by Brooke Clarke

flavicon
face
Hi Lee:

I found a saber saw (aka Jig Saw) at Walmart for $9.95 that has a couple of threaded inserts.
This allows mounting it under a bench top with just the blade sticking up.  You need to allow for a 0.050 kerf between boards.  Fine tooth metal cutting blades work best.

But the Northern Tool Mini Shear & Brake looks like a much better way, but for > an order of magnitude more money.
<http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&productId=210804&R=210804>

Have Fun,

Brooke Clarke, N6GCE
--
w/Java http://www.PRC68.com
w/o Java www.pacificsites.com/~brooke/PRC68COM.shtml
http://www.precisionclock.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2005 18:54:15 +1100
From: Lee McLaren <EraseMElmclarenspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTTASNET.NET>
To: pic microcontroller discussion list <PICLISTspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu>
Subject: [OT] Cutting PCB
Message-ID: <@spam@438AB7A7.2040602KILLspamspamtasnet.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Precedence: list
Reply-To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <KILLspampiclistKILLspamspammit.edu>
Message: 54

Hi,

Can anyone suggest a good way to cut fiberglass printed circuit board, I
currently use the old score with a Stanley knife but its very slow and I
am concerned that when I bend the pcb to break it off that the pcb is
getting bent slightly forever.
I have tried an electric tile cutter which looks like a saw blade
without teeth which is coated with something hard like diamonds, it work
ok but is slow and creates a lot of dust.


regards

Lee McLaren

2005\11\28@153145 by Peter

picon face

On Mon, 28 Nov 2005, Russell McMahon wrote:

>> Guillotine
>
> Which is what PCB houses tend to use.

I think that most automated houses use a mill bit in the CNC machine for
that. Also large volume often use a mini disc saw table (diamond or
carbon) to cut boards out of panelized plates.

Peter

2005\11\28@153617 by Peter

picon face

On Mon, 28 Nov 2005, Lee McLaren wrote:

> I probably should have said "cheap (sub $100AUD) way of cutting pcb.
>
> The larger guillotine's do a great job but are over $1000, is anyone having
> luck with a cheaper paper guillotine?

It depends on how much board you need to cut. A mini disc saw table will
be about $100-$200 (try modelling supply shops or a product like
Proxxon). The carbon disc to go with it can be $30-$50 but it will last
forever if you take care of it.

Cheap guillotines often shear the 2-sided copper FR4, which is ductile
and refuses to be cut neatly (esp. nonstandard thickness).

Peter

2005\11\28@194140 by David P Harris

picon face
Russell McMahon wrote:

>> Guillotine
>
>
> Which is what PCB houses tend to use.
>
Yes, sheet metal guillotine (I have used a heavy duty paper one with
success), or a motorized tile cutter in water to cut down on dust.

David


2005\11\28@213755 by rosoftwarecontrol

flavicon
face
wow, this one is good. really good.
it even can punch a quare hole!

where to buy?


----- Original Message -----
From: "John J. McDonough" <RemoveMEmcdTakeThisOuTspamis-sixsigma.com>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <spamBeGonepiclistspamBeGonespammit.edu>
Sent: Monday, November 28, 2005 8:48 AM
Subject: Re: [OT] Cutting PCB


> I got the small brake and shear from Northern Tool -- I think it was under
> $100.  I don't do a lot of metal bending, althought that's one of those
> things I want to do more when I get the time (ha) but it is the perfect
> thing for cutting circuit board.  The only issue with the little one is
that
> it is fairly small.  Once in a while I need to take a large sheet down
with
> a tin snips first, then do the shear to clean it up.  But mostly, it is
the
> right tool for the job.
>
> I'd actually go out and buy a bigger one (I think they have a fairly large
> shear for around $300), but I have no idea where I'd put the thing!
>
> I have no idea who a down under equivalent of Northern would be.  These
> things are heavy and I suspect that shipping to .au would cost more than
the
> shear.  But I think there is someone ... seems like when I was looking for
> mine I found a much nicer one at some Australian supplier, but the
shipping
{Quote hidden}

2005\11\28@220719 by rosoftwarecontrol

flavicon
face
my board is always small and thin, I use scisors,
accurate and handy.

But I see a hand saw is good enough for cut thick
and middle size pcb board.

Wet tile diamond cutter is good, but I feel I got
too much machine just for pcb: a spicified laser printer,
a set of tool to do clean, a contant T laminator, a
contant T etching tank, a drill table, a reflow oven,
a set of chemicals. Cutting should be simplized.

Actually I have a table saw for cutting Al heat sink
and can be used for pcb when they are big and thick.



{Original Message removed}

2005\11\29@100422 by rosoftwarecontrol

flavicon
face
ya, good way.

but, today, I just bought a band saw for my pcb cutting.
Should I return it and upside down my jig saw? Is jig
saw little bit of noisy?



{Original Message removed}

2005\11\30@044704 by Lee McLaren

flavicon
face
Thanks everyone for the suggestions, I do like the look of the mini
shear but I haven't found a supplier in Australia so I may try the paper
guillotine and the jig saw and see how they go.

regards

Lee McLaren

2005\11\30@115403 by Dwayne Reid

flavicon
face
At 11:16 AM 11/28/2005, Danny Sauer wrote:
>Padu wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] Cutting PCB' on Mon, Nov 28 at 11:59:
> > I'm using a regular jig saw upside down. I lock its handle with a vise and
> > turn it on. My saw has an ON lock, but you could use a piece of wire to
>
>That gets the award for "most dangerous-sounding method which I've
>considered attempting myself" - and possibly "most likely to result in
>loss of blood". :)

It depends upon which jig saw you have.  The one I've had for years
is a Bosch unit that doesn't have a "handle" as such - its of the
style called "barrel grip" where the part you hold onto is the actual
motor.  I prefer that style because it keeps my hand down near the
work-piece and give much better control.

But it also mounts in a bench vise easily - and securely.  This
leaves both hands free for manipulating the work-piece.  Its no more
dangerous than a band saw - probably less.

>I won't mention how I built a "table saw" out of a circular saw, a 4' x
>4' sheet of plywood, two sawhorses, and some zip ties.  That'd take
>most of my safety inspector credibility away...

Hey - whatever works!  If it was supported properly and secured so
that it couldn't slide on the sawhorses, I don't see it being any
more dangerous that some of those cheapie table saws down at your
local Home Depot.

The real hazard when jury-rigging something like this when something
slips or moves when or where you don't expect it to.  The sudden
release of pressure is often what causes your hand to go where you
really don't want it to go.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <dwaynerEraseMEspam.....planet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

Celebrating 21 years of Engineering Innovation (1984 - 2005)
 .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-
    `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'
Do NOT send unsolicited commercial email to this email address.
This message neither grants consent to receive unsolicited
commercial email nor is intended to solicit commercial email.

2005\11\30@133900 by Danny Sauer

flavicon
face
Dwayne wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] Cutting PCB' on Wed, Nov 30 at 11:00:
> At 11:16 AM 11/28/2005, Danny Sauer wrote:
> >That gets the award for "most dangerous-sounding method which I've
> >considered attempting myself" - and possibly "most likely to result in
> >loss of blood". :)
>
> It depends upon which jig saw you have.  The one I've had for years
> is a Bosch unit that doesn't have a "handle" as such - its of the
> style called "barrel grip" where the part you hold onto is the actual
> motor.  I prefer that style because it keeps my hand down near the
> work-piece and give much better control.

Are you talking about one of those spiral saws which have recently
become pretty popular (I really like my RotoZip) or a traditional
right-angle jigsaw?  My Jigsaw experience is mostly limited to Black
and Decker, since I don't really use one often.  It's like a Sawzall
for whimps. :)

> But it also mounts in a bench vise easily - and securely.  This
> leaves both hands free for manipulating the work-piece.  Its no more
> dangerous than a band saw - probably less.

Just in case you're serious about that:

A proper bandsaw has adjustable upper guide rollers and a guard which
comes down with them.  You set the rollers to a height just slightly
above your workpiece.  That gives better stability to the blade, and
at the same time hides all of the blade except for the bare minimum to
cut whatever you intend to cut.  In combination with a push stick,
feather board, and/or any of the myriad other safety devices (it
oughtta at least have a miter guage for pushing the stock through at a
fixed angle), I'd go so far as to say that a properly set up bandsaw
is the most safe powersaw one could find.  If the guard extends down
far enough to just allow a PCB though (most good ones should) there
wouldn't even be enough room for fingers to fit in.  Never mind that
the big appeal of a bandsaw is a constant cutting direction.  Since
the blade is constantly moving down, it's also only pulling the
workpiece down into the table.  A jigsaw or other reciprocating-type
saw moves back and forth, so half the time the operator has to counter
the blade's tendency to push the piece off of the table.  The design
of the teeth (esp. a metal cutting blade as was suggested) does
minimize that, as does use of a high speed, but it really doesn't
compare to a bandsaw.

Though I honestly don't have a problem with mounting a saw in a vice,
it'd be one heck of a stretch to call it safer than a proper bench- or
floor-mounted tool. :)  The cheapie table saws sold at the local home
store nonwithstanding, of course.  Like I said, I have regularly used
the wrong tool for the job - but for those here who might not have
lots of power tool experience it's probably a bad idea to downplay how
dangerous that really is.  Never mind that anyone who knows me would
call me the *last* person who oughtta be preaching about safety. ;)

--Danny, who still has a significant scar on his finger from a *power
screwdriver* accident (which was followed about 2 days later by a
punchdown tool accident to the same finger - which left another less
noticable scar.  That was a bad week for my left index finger)

2005\11\30@175004 by Dwayne Reid

flavicon
face
At 11:38 AM 11/30/2005, Danny Sauer wrote:
> >
> > It depends upon which jig saw you have.  The one I've had for years
> > is a Bosch unit that doesn't have a "handle" as such - its of the
> > style called "barrel grip" where the part you hold onto is the actual
> > motor.  I prefer that style because it keeps my hand down near the
> > work-piece and give much better control.
>
>Are you talking about one of those spiral saws which have recently
>become pretty popular (I really like my RotoZip) or a traditional
>right-angle jigsaw?  My Jigsaw experience is mostly limited to Black
>and Decker, since I don't really use one often.  It's like a Sawzall
>for whimps. :)

Nope - not a rotary tool.  Quite frankly, I consider those far more
dangerous than a jig saw.

Maybe its because I've been using a jig saw since before I was a teenager.

One of the reasons I consider them less dangerous than a band saw is
because the blade reciprocates.  You get serious cutting action only
while you are holding the work-piece against the sole plate.

Try it sometime: fire up your jig saw and hold a piece of wood
against the blade but not against the sole plate.  The wood simply
moves up and down with the motion of the blade.

I'm not saying that a finger won't sustain damage under the same
conditions - it will - but the damage is far less than that same
finger held against a moving band saw blade.

dwayne (who also has a Sawzall)

--
Dwayne Reid   <EraseMEdwaynerspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

Celebrating 21 years of Engineering Innovation (1984 - 2005)
 .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-
    `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'
Do NOT send unsolicited commercial email to this email address.
This message neither grants consent to receive unsolicited
commercial email nor is intended to solicit commercial email.

2005\11\30@185550 by Jinx

face picon face
> A proper bandsaw has adjustable upper guide rollers and a
> guard which comes down with them.  You set the rollers to
> a height just slightly above your workpiece.  That gives better
> stability to the blade, and at the same time hides all of the blade
> except for the bare minimum to cut whatever you intend to cut

I feel a lot safer cutting any material with a bandsaw rather than
a jigsaw, especially small pieces of PCB. For the reasons you
mention plus a bandsaw is floor- or bench-mounted and doesn't
move, so is steady and stable. The downward travel of the blade
pushes the work firmly against the table (always use a piece of
scrap wood under thin materials). The other advantage is that a
bandsaw has a much longer blade (~ 2000mm) and that takes a
very long time to dull compared to the repetitive cutting with a
small length (~25mm) of a jigsaw or scrollsaw. The blade on my
scrollsaw does not last long with FR4 board, so I hardly ever use
it for that. And jigsaws and scrollsaws are too prone to chattering
and vibration, which gets very tiring on the fingers, that can go
quite numb

2005\11\30@193841 by Andre Abelian

flavicon
face
when it comes making PCB I just send it out about 5by5 " cast me
about 40$ why bother making it. When I was 15 years old it was
interesting how to make it but not any more specially dealing with acid eats
your clothes makes a mess in the end looks home made.

Andre



Dwayne Reid wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2005\11\30@204238 by Tom Wehn

picon face
OK I'll admit it I'm a lurker. In this case I do have some input so here it
is. I made over 50 HDTV distribution amps from scratch, I should have had
the boards made but they were one here and three there so I didn't. My
error. I made a jig for my dremmel flex shaft that mounted it to my router
table. Then I made a platform that fit in my table to square up the double
sided photoresit boards. I used the oversized cutoff wheels and trimmed the
boards to size in under a minute. The only problem I had was the exposed
edge that was less than a millimeter (did this under normal light for
safety). Ended up with am amp that was down .1 Db at 100 MHz, had 21 RCA and
2 3.5 mm jacks as well as an LED. Every board except 1 turned out perfect. I
still use this jig to make one of boards for my personal projects. Due to
the smell I do it in my garage with an air filter and safety glasses.

Tom W.



'[OT] Cutting PCB'
2005\12\01@003743 by Jesse Lackey
flavicon
face
Ahh, I've done it several ways...

1) dremel with cutting wheel.  wow, what a horrible mess of powdered
fiberglass!  And, shattering/blackened wheels, and, awkwardness if you
have to hold the dremel at an angle sometimes.  And, guaranteed you'll
never have a straight line.  Never again.

2) paper cutter.  Well, mine lasted for about 25 cuts.  And it was
reasonably strong, tho not industrial-grade.  Never again.

3) nibbler.  This works, but it is certainly slow and fatiguing.  Good
to have around, sometimes you just need to take a little bit out.

4) tin snips.  This is it!  get the kind that aren't "curved", hard to
explain and I'm not entirely clear on this, but there exist three types:
curved to the left, to the right, and straight.  The cuts are straight,
but one is limited to the length of the blade, beyond that is doable but
awkward.  But they are $15 and sit in a tool box, there when you need 'em.

5) bandsaw.  Again the cuts aren't straight (but could use some wooden
blocks to hold things to fix this), but its fast and you can make 'em as
long as you'd like.  Put a sheet of paper under the board so when you
slide it on the metal base-plate is doesn't scrape off silk or traces.
Disadvantage - well, they are large... (I used to work in a place with a
machine shop, they had one.)

The combination of tin snips, gerbmerge for merging different designs
together, and barebonespcb.com for cheap (ish) turnarounds of protos
where they don't care if you have done the merge (everybody else does)
is a winner.

Also suggest - a file.  The edges may be kinda rough, esp. with a
bandsaw.  A file to clean them up a bit is real nice.

J


Lee McLaren wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2005\12\01@032214 by Jinx

face picon face
> 5) bandsaw.  Again the cuts aren't straight (but could use some
> wooden blocks to hold things to fix this)

Oh, "a bad workman blames his tools" ;-) The *saw* doesn't cut
crookedly. Once you get your eye in it's pretty easy to follow a
line. Although when I got my strapping 16yo nephew to do some
it looked like they'd been done by a monkey on acid. I'm told
we're actually related but I found that hard to believe at the time ;-)

(keep comments to yourselves please ;-))

Not too hard to make a guide to to do a straight line though. Finish
up with a file, as you said, or a belt sander

> Disadvantage - well, they are large...

Advantage - useful for all kinds of things. From sawing frozen
meat (true, wouldn't fit in the freezer) to odd shapes and angles
in timber that would be very tedious to do any other way

A router is handy too, with a 1/4" and 1/8" flute

2005\12\01@044833 by S Bakaletz

flavicon
face

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jesse Lackey" <RemoveMEjsl-mlEraseMEspamEraseMEcelestialaudio.com>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <RemoveMEpiclistspam_OUTspamKILLspammit.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2005 21:37
Subject: Re: [OT] Cutting PCB

I use a 4" tablesaw from Harbor Freight Tools
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=46379

2005\12\01@130131 by Peter

picon face

On Thu, 1 Dec 2005, Jesse Lackey wrote:

> Ahh, I've done it several ways...
>
> 1) dremel with cutting wheel.  wow, what a horrible mess of powdered
> fiberglass!  And, shattering/blackened wheels, and, awkwardness if you have
> to hold the dremel at an angle sometimes.  And, guaranteed you'll never have
> a straight line.  Never again.

Try to make a table for the Dremel and use a carbon disc (NOT diamond).

Another option I have no seen mentioned here is a jeweller's saw with a
metal blade. This is slow but you can cut out any crazy contour.

As to the fiber dust: the board is made of fiber dust and epoxy.
Therefore if you cut it there will be some of it floating around. It
depends on you whether you filter it with your lungs or mop it up with
your bare hands or not.

Peter

2005\12\01@155417 by Danny Sauer

flavicon
face
Dwayne wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] Cutting PCB' on Wed, Nov 30 at 17:08:
> Nope - not a rotary tool.  Quite frankly, I consider those far more
> dangerous than a jig saw.

The next time you need to put a new outlet into an existing wall, use
that as an excuse to get a spiral saw (excuses to buy new tools are
great).  You'll be sold.  Plunge cuts and tight corners are easy.  You
can do things that would otherwise require drilling several 1/4" holes
if you were using a jigsaw.

> Try it sometime: fire up your jig saw and hold a piece of wood
> against the blade but not against the sole plate.  The wood simply
> moves up and down with the motion of the blade.

If you catch it while the blade's fully down, that's true.  Otherwise,
the point on the blade you contact may at some point end up beneath
the shoe and it *will* get cut. But really, what the heck are you
doing touching the blade while operating if you *don't* want to cut?
:)  If you don't want things cut, turn the saw off and quit poking at
it, for heaven's sake. :)

--Danny

2005\12\02@123737 by Dwayne Reid

flavicon
face
At 01:54 PM 12/1/2005, Danny Sauer wrote:
>Dwayne wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] Cutting PCB' on Wed, Nov 30 at 17:08:
> > Nope - not a rotary tool.  Quite frankly, I consider those far more
> > dangerous than a jig saw.
>
>The next time you need to put a new outlet into an existing wall, use
>that as an excuse to get a spiral saw (excuses to buy new tools are
>great).  You'll be sold.  Plunge cuts and tight corners are easy.  You
>can do things that would otherwise require drilling several 1/4" holes
>if you were using a jigsaw.

I've had one since the first version of the Roto-Zip was
released.  Didn't really need it, I suppose, since its darned similar
to my Porter Cable laminate trimmer.  But I'm a tool-hound and I like
the fact that it came with a 1/8" collet as well as the 1/4"
collet.  My Porter Cable laminate trimmer has only a 1/4" collect
available and I'm not a major fan of the little 1/4" to 1/8" adapter
that is now available to allow use of Roto-Zip spiral blades.

I speak from experience when I say that I think that it is far more
dangerous than a jig saw.  I was specifically referring to cutting
PCB material and its just too darned hard to keep it going in a
straight line.  That also means that it is easy for you to slip and
get a finger into the blade.

But no question about it - its a darned useful tool when used as the
designers intended.  The real innovation they brought to the market
was their 1/8" spiral bits - I had been using my laminate trimmer
much the same way I now use the Roto-Zip, except using 1/4" up-cut
spiral bits and piloted cutout bits.

Back to the original subject: I spent a lot of time in years past
trying to figure out the easiest way to cut PCB material.  I was
lucky enough to learn from a couple of local small business operators
while I was in school - they wanted to set up their own PCB
manufacturing business.

They started with Olfa P-cutter knives - work well when you are doing
only small quantities of boards.  Then started using a tile-cutter
(looks all the world like a tiny metal-cutting shear).  But those
kept busting every couple of months or so.  Gary finally broke down
and bought a proper shear - that was the end of any problems.  They
used that 'til they shut down the business.

Back in the days before we started Trinity Electronics, I had bought
an old Dewalt radial arm saw.  Still have it - works great!  Back
when we started making our own prototype PCBs, I used that saw (in
rip mode) to cut the 3'x4' sheets of copper-clad into long but narrow
strips for easier handling.  We didn't yet have our own shear, so we
used an Olfa P-cutter to cut out a small number of boards or used the
radial arm saw if cutting large numbers of them.  Hearing and eye
protection mandatory!

I still use that saw to cut large sheets of raw PCB material down to
easily handled strips.  But we've now got a 30" metal shear that we
use to cut those strips to the desired size.

We still make a lot of prototype PCBs here.  Its darned useful and
very quick - just a few hours from finished layout to stuffed board
ready for testing.  But not as many as when we first started out 20
odd years ago - APCircuits now gets a lot of business from us.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <RemoveMEdwaynerTakeThisOuTspamspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

Celebrating 21 years of Engineering Innovation (1984 - 2005)
 .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-
    `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'
Do NOT send unsolicited commercial email to this email address.
This message neither grants consent to receive unsolicited
commercial email nor is intended to solicit commercial email.

2005\12\02@132220 by Danny Sauer

flavicon
face
Dwayne wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] Cutting PCB' on Fri, Dec 02 at 11:41:
> I've had one since the first version of the Roto-Zip was released.
> Didn't really need it, I suppose, since its darned similar to my
> Porter Cable laminate trimmer.  But I'm a tool-hound and I like the
> fact that it came with a 1/8" collet as well as the 1/4" collet.  My
> Porter Cable laminate trimmer has only a 1/4" collect available and
> I'm not a major fan of the little 1/4" to 1/8" adapter that is now
> available to allow use of Roto-Zip spiral blades.

Amusingly, that's when and essentially why I bought one (shiny new
tool that I can half justify).  I'd been using my cordless Dremel with
an 1/8" burr previously, and wanted more power / runtime.  I also got
the angle grinder / cutter attachment because my air compressor wasn't
big enough to power the air cut off tool.  I think I've used the
circle cutter more than anything - it's surprising how often I need to
cut large circles in wood now that I have a proper tool for doing so.
:)

> I speak from experience when I say that I think that it is far more
> dangerous than a jig saw.  I was specifically referring to cutting
> PCB material and its just too darned hard to keep it going in a
> straight line.  That also means that it is easy for you to slip and
> get a finger into the blade.

Ohhh.  I thought you were speaking in general.  Using a RotoZip on a
PCB would just be craziness.  I'd be surprised if anyone who did that
*didn't* get hurt - it's pretty nearly impossible to cut a straight
line with those things unless you have a guide - and difficult even
then. :)

--Danny

2005\12\02@182834 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Dec 2, 2005, at 10:22 AM, Danny Sauer wrote:

> Using a RotoZip on a PCB would just be craziness.

Well, I use a CNC router table (actually an LPKF PCB mill) with
3/32 inch router bits to cut out PCBs.  Works great, but the bits
don't last too long :-(  fiberglass is tough stuff.  The dust gets
sucked up by the vacuum, too, which is comforting.  It's not THAT
different, but I guess I agree that doing something similar with a
handheld tool would be pretty awful...

Not enough people are agreeing with the 'use thin board and tinsnip
or "penny cutting scissors' method.  That works quite nicely.  (although
by the time your boards are that thin, I imagine a lot of things work
pretty well.)

BillW

2005\12\04@111533 by Paul Duffy

picon face
I use a band saw - 10" Delta benchtop unit - then sand the edge to remove
the burr.



----- Original Message -----
From: "Lee McLaren" <EraseMElmclarenspamspamspamBeGonetasnet.net>
To: "pic microcontroller discussion list" <RemoveMEPICLISTKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu>
Sent: Monday, November 28, 2005 2:54 AM
Subject: [OT] Cutting PCB


{Quote hidden}

> --

2005\12\04@111533 by Paul Duffy

picon face
I use a band saw - 10" Delta benchtop unit - then sand the edge to remove
the burr.



----- Original Message -----
From: "Lee McLaren" <lmclarenSTOPspamspamspam_OUTtasnet.net>
To: "pic microcontroller discussion list" <spamBeGonePICLISTSTOPspamspamEraseMEmitvma.mit.edu>
Sent: Monday, November 28, 2005 2:54 AM
Subject: [OT] Cutting PCB


{Quote hidden}

> --

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2005 , 2006 only
- Today
- New search...