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'[OT] Camera import SD vs. USB connector wear'
2012\03\07@015612 by V G

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In the long run, what's a better way to import pictures from my camera (in
terms of connector wear) - by taking out the SD card and sticking it into
my computer, or plugging the camera in with the USB cable

2012\03\07@090503 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

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Em 7/3/2012 03:55, V G escreveu:
> In the long run, what's a better way to import pictures from my camera (in
> terms of connector wear) - by taking out the SD card and sticking it into
> my computer, or plugging the camera in with the USB cable?

The USB connector has less contacts, is more widely available, was
designed for frequent insertion and removal and is more standardized
than the SD Card slot (board footprint-wise).
It will be much easier to find a new USB connector that fits your camera
when you need to replace it, and it will be easier to do the replacement.


Isaac

2012\03\07@100358 by RussellMc

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> In the long run, what's a better way to import pictures from my camera (in
> terms of connector wear) - by taking out the SD card and sticking it into
> my computer, or plugging the camera in with the USB cable?

Despite what Isaac said, I'd lean towards using a reader to read the SD card.
Reading may be faster, the camera is not tied to the PC and I think
reliability is probably better (see below).

FWIW I use a download program which copies files with the attribute
bit not set and then sets it. This leaves all files on card until
deleted or formatted and acts as a backup once a copy has been
downloaded. I carry enough memory cards to cover a days maximum
expected requirement (About 50 GB). During major events I download
cards progressively, which allows security against loss and as the
working card is swapped regularly as I proceed means the photos which
may be lost catastrophically is minimised. I have only lost one batch
of photos this way - at a wedding from just after the ceremony proper,
during the ministers advice to the couple and up until they were about
to leave the church - almost all guest shots. (I still have the card
and expect it will probably be able to be recovered "one of hese
days".)


AFAIK you have a Nikon D90. If so, replacing either USB socket or SD
card socket in the camera will probably be annoyingly expensive.

IF the camera uses mini-USB (as opposed to micro USB) I'd be wary of
overusing it as mini USB has cycle lifetime issues.

SD cards and sockets also have cycle ratings but I have never had a
problem with card sockets on cameras using either CF or SD cards.

I'd expect Nikon to use a reasonably good quality SD card socket.
This HiRose SD socket has 10,000 insert/remove cycle rating
          http://www.hirose-connectors.com/connectors/H205SeriesGaiyou.aspx?c1=DM1

If you insert / remove an SD card  5 times per day for 5 years that's
about 9000 cycles.
Twice a day on average for 10 years is about 7500 cycles.
Even I don't manage 5 insert/remove cycles per day - except perhaps
during events or when travelling.
The in camera SD socket should be OK.

The same applies theoretically to a mini-USB socket BUT I have seen
many of these with mechanical problems. Card readers with mini USB
connectors failed so often for me that I now use only readers with
captive cords at the card reader end and a USB A plug at the PC end.
Full size USB A theoretically has as low an insertion life as Mini USB
but I cannot see why this should be so and I have never had problems
with properly constructed ones. Some cheaper devices have non standard
PCB based plugs which can cause problems.

For my own DSLR cameras (most with CF, latest with SD) I remove the card.



                Russell McMaho

2012\03\07@102840 by mcd

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> IF the camera uses mini-USB (as opposed to micro USB) I'd be wary
> of overusing it as mini USB has cycle lifetime issues.

I have an older Nikon, and I take way more pictures than the average bear.
The camera end of the USB cable on mine has some oddball connector, and
although my camera is probably close to the end of its useful life, there
is no evidence of wear on the connector.  On the other hand, since it
appears to be some sort of proprietary connector, it probably is obscenely
expensive, if replaceable at all.

The connector looks a lot like a micro-USB, but it isn't quite the same.

> For my own DSLR cameras (most with CF, latest with SD) I remove the card.

Once I installed a reader into my PC, as opposed to using a separate
reader, it became much more convenient to remove the card.  Previously I
used the cable almost exclusively.  A CF/SD/etc. reader integrated with a
floppy drive is almost as cheap as a separate reader.

--McD

2012\03\07@111813 by Kerry Wentworth
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V G wrote:
> In the long run, what's a better way to import pictures from my camera (in
> terms of connector wear) - by taking out the SD card and sticking it into
> my computer, or plugging the camera in with the USB cable?
>   You can still use the camera if the USB connector wears out, but if the SD connector wears out, you can't.
If it was me, and I was worried about wear, I'd use USB until it wears out or breaks, then shift to SD.

Kerry

2012\03\07@124613 by Brooke Clarke

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Hi:

Within the past month I spent over $200 to have the Mini USB socket replaced on my Nikon D300s.  I take a lot of photos to illustrate my web pages and on some days there may be a dozen USB connector cycles.  The larger problem with using the USB connector is when you forget to unplug it and later pickup the camera and walk away.  There's a similar problem when using a headset and walking away.  A way to reduce that problem is to use a short extension cord so that it will uncouple easily rather than putting high forces on the connector that's not in line with the cable.

A much better way to getting the photos out of the camera is to use the newest  Eye-Fi Pro X2 SD card.  This card supports Nikon's NEF RAW file format whereas the prior card only supports .jpg files.  These are WiFi cards that can automatically download photos to your local WiFi network, or (haven't tried this yet) lacking a local network will download directly to a computer that's been setup to accept a direct WiFi connection.
http://www.prc68.com/I/Nikon.shtml#Eye-Fi

-- Have Fun,

Brooke Clarke
http://www.PRC68.com
http://www.end2partygovernment.com/Brooke4Congress.html

2012\03\07@134056 by V G

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On Wed, Mar 7, 2012 at 12:46 PM, Brooke Clarke <spam_OUTbrookeTakeThisOuTspampacific.net> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Thank you! That looks very interesting

2012\03\08@131928 by Herbert Graf

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On Wed, 2012-03-07 at 01:55 -0500, V G wrote:
> In the long run, what's a better way to import pictures from my camera (in
> terms of connector wear) - by taking out the SD card and sticking it into
> my computer, or plugging the camera in with the USB cable?

No idea, but consider this:

the time it would take to wear out either is probably much longer then
the useful life of your camera due to obsolescence.

I wouldn't (and don't) worry about it.

TTYL

2012\03\08@135427 by V G

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On Thu, Mar 8, 2012 at 1:19 PM, Herbert Graf <.....hkgrafKILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:

>  No idea, but consider this:
>
> the time it would take to wear out either is probably much longer then
> the useful life of your camera due to obsolescence.
>
> I wouldn't (and don't) worry about it.
>
>
People keep telling me this, but there are many things that I keep that
last me many years and continue to fulfill some purpose after their "useful
lifetime". I like to take care of my stuff. Principles

2012\03\08@195729 by RussellMc

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>> the time it would take to wear out either is probably much longer then
>> the useful life of your camera due to obsolescence.
>>
>> I wouldn't (and don't) worry about it.
>>
>>
> People keep telling me this, but there are many things that I keep that
> last me many years and continue to fulfill some purpose after their "useful
> lifetime". I like to take care of my stuff. Principles.

I tend to use my cameras far more heavily than most people. I often
take a batch of technical photos and then swap the card into a reader
or PC to download, so on some days I may do 10 card changes. Nt every
day certainly. I have never has a camera card insertion problem. I
have had a number of card reader issues of a range of sorts. And I
have had numerous mini-USB socket and plug problems. I'd be happy that
an SXD card socket in a quality camera will outlast the shutter
mechanism for most users. When the shutter fails (50,000 to 200,000+
actuations depending on model)  you could get them to change the USB
and SD sockets at the same time.

 Russel

2012\03\09@104616 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 07:56 PM 08/03/2012, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

From what I've seen, the rating for either type of socket (Micro USB or
SD) is 10,000 insertions, so it ought not to matter much. It's easier
to abuse the USB though (I've had to fix a Garmin GPS because the
leverage on the USB socket was sufficient to crack the RoHS solder
joints with a bit of jiggling- but DSLRs would likely use flex PCBs
so the leverage wouldn't exist). Still, I would not think using a
connector saver would be a good idea... more likely to cause problems
than to solve them.


At 10,000 insertions you could average download sessions 10x per day for
several years. If your shutter lasts for 100K photos, so long as you
average more than 10 photos taken (not necessarily downloaded) per
download you should be fine. ;-)  And, as you say, a dead
socket is a major maintenance item (C check or D check), not necessarily
the end of the line for the camera.

--sp

2012\03\09@122442 by V G

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On Thu, Mar 8, 2012 at 7:56 PM, RussellMc <apptechnzspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:

> I tend to use my cameras far more heavily than most people. I often
> take a batch of technical photos and then swap the card into a reader
> or PC to download, so on some days I may do 10 card changes. Nt every
> day certainly. I have never has a camera card insertion problem. I
> have had a number of card reader issues of a range of sorts. And I
> have had numerous mini-USB socket and plug problems. I'd be happy that
> an SXD card socket in a quality camera will outlast the shutter
> mechanism for most users. When the shutter fails (50,000 to 200,000+
> actuations depending on model)  you could get them to change the USB
> and SD sockets at the same time.
>

Well as long as they can change the components for a reasonable price, I'm
happy with it and wouldn't worry about it

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