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'[OT] Building a house - Collated, spindled and mut'
2006\09\26@010656 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
Whew!  I did not expect 100 emails to result from this question.  I
purposefully didn't respond to them as they came in - I didn't want to
"spoil" the brainstorming.  Now that the discussion has died down a
bit, and after spending many hours with a wiki and CTRL-C and CTRL-V,
I've put together a wiki containing most of the advise that's been
given:

http://ubasics.com/home

You can add comments to the main page, and to some other pages.  I
haven't figured out the permissions fully so some pages don't allow
comments.

It worked so well I think my next topic is going to be:
"[PIC] Building a circuit - Help me brainstorm"
"I've got a 5v supply, some bits of wire, and a little money.  Please
consider the following questions:
1) What would you do differently about your current or previous circuit?
2) Assuming unlimited budget, what would you build into your circuit?
3) Any new technology I should consider?
4)  What would you do with 10 square inches of PCB?"

It'll be the best circuit ever!  :-D

-Adam

2006\09\26@015913 by Randy Glenn

picon face
5V? Why 5V, when 3.3V offers you so many more possibilities?

On 9/26/06, M. Adam Davis <spam_OUTstienmanTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\09\26@055304 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
Adam,

On Tue, 26 Sep 2006 01:06:55 -0400, M. Adam Davis wrote:

> Whew!  I did not expect 100 emails to result from this question.

Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!  :-)

 I
> purposefully didn't respond to them as they came in - I didn't want to
> "spoil" the brainstorming.  Now that the discussion has died down a
> bit, and after spending many hours with a wiki and CTRL-C and CTRL-V,
> I've put together a wiki containing most of the advise that's been
> given:
>
> http://ubasics.com/home

Great!  The PIClist is a great resource but it's very handy to have it all collated and indexed like this - wel done!  Just one thing though - can you set
the text in something a bit easier to read than gray-on-white, please?

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\09\26@081225 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
On 9/26/06, Howard Winter <.....HDRWKILLspamspam@spam@h2org.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> Adam,
>
> On Tue, 26 Sep 2006 01:06:55 -0400, M. Adam Davis wrote:
> > I've put together a wiki containing most of the advise that's been
> > given:
> >
> > http://ubasics.com/home
>
> Great!  The PIClist is a great resource but it's very handy to have it all collated and indexed like this - wel done!  Just one thing though - can you set
> the text in something a bit easier to read than gray-on-white, please?

Yeah, I spent 1/2 hour trying to fix it earlier, but changing the CSS
file didn't do what I expected, so I'm going to have to fiddle with it
a bit more.

<5 minutes passes>

Ok, I finally figured out what to change.  I found the right CSS block
previously, but I made the number higher to make it darker.  That's
wrong.  I set it to 000000 (black) and now it's much more readable.

Thanks for reminding me.

-Adam

2006\09\26@082836 by Rolf

face picon face
M. Adam Davis wrote:
> Whew!  I did not expect 100 emails to result from this question.  I
> purposefully didn't respond to them as they came in - I didn't want to
> "spoil" the brainstorming.  Now that the discussion has died down a
> bit, and after spending many hours with a wiki and CTRL-C and CTRL-V,
> I've put together a wiki containing most of the advise that's been
> given:
>
> http://ubasics.com/home
>
>  
[snip]
> It'll be the best circuit ever!  :-D
>
> -Adam
>  
Thanks Adam.

Great job, and well done.

Rolf

2006\09\26@102528 by Dave Lag

picon face
M. Adam Davis wrote:

>>>I've put together a wiki containing most of the advise that's been
>>>given:
>>>
>>>http://ubasics.com/home
> -Adam

Many things we have not mentioned, air exchangers, radon gass venting, etc.

An excellent but readable reference book
"Canadian Wood-Frame House Construction" CMHC

I "believe" this has common ancestry to an American publication:
"Forest Service Agriculture Handbook #73 Wood-Frame House Construction

This handbook presents sound principles for wood-
frame house construction and suggestions for selecting
suitable materials to assist the construction of a good
house. The organization reflects the general progression
of activity in building a wood-frame house, from initial
conception to completed structure. Chapter 1 describes
matters that should be considered or dealt with before
beginning construction. Chapters 2-4 describe steps in
laying the groundwork, framing and closing in, and com-
pleting the shell, which are usually taken one after
another in the order presented. Chapters 5-7 describe
later tasks that can often be done in some order other
than presented. Chapter 8 discusses special topics often
associated with wood-frame construction. Technical notes,
annotated list of suggestions for additional reading, and
glossary are provided.



It would be worthwhile to read up on the Canadian R2000 program.
( dunno what the American equivalent might be)

overview:
oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf

2006\09\26@113620 by Joe McCauley

picon face
Are Radon sumps not part of building regulations/code everywhere then? Here
in Ireland as far as I'm aware all new construction must have a radon
barrier & radon sump. In high risk areas these must be retrofitted in some
cases if I'm not mistaken.

These regulations are, like all regulations, sometimes over applied. I had
my home extended a couple of years back & had to have a radon barrier & sump
fitted. I ended up with a large room, one half of which had the radon
protection fitted & the other half (>100 years old) had none. Guess I'll be
fine if I stay in the new half......


Joe

>
> Many things we have not mentioned, air exchangers, radon gass
> venting, etc.
>


2006\09\26@115400 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>These regulations are, like all regulations, sometimes over applied.
>I had my home extended a couple of years back & had to have a radon
>barrier & sump fitted. I ended up with a large room, one half of
>which had the radon protection fitted & the other half (>100 years old)
>had none. Guess I'll be fine if I stay in the new half......

Ahh, ya just gotta love planning inspectors ....... (LOL)

2006\09\26@120347 by James Newtons Massmind

face picon face
I didn't see any mention in the wiki of integrated solar panels as a roofing
material.

And for an even easier option there is now a peel and stick version. Nice
article in this months Mother Earth News. Peel and stick the solar panel to
the metal sheeting, tack it to the roof, cover the peak with a cap. The
panels interlock and the cap covers the electrical interconnects. Very
slick.

On the Geothermal Heating and Cooling page, there is no mention of earth
tubes. The Passive Solar Heating and Cooling page makes only passing
mention. Earth tubes are a really interesting idea in my opinion.

Ah... I see, "Trench Geothermal Cooling"

I would also recommend a lot more interconnection between terms, but that
takes much work.

Overall, its great! I do wish more people would use the wiki abilities of
piclist.com, but...

---
James Newton, massmind.org Knowledge Archiver
jamesspamKILLspammassmind.org 1-619-652-0593 fax:1-208-279-8767
http://www.massmind.org Saving what YOU know.

2006\09\26@122316 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
All new construction must include a vapor barier and drain tile under
the foundation and slab.  If radon tests determine the radon level is
too high then remediation is installed, which connects to the drain
tile and, if I understand correctly, simply vents the air from the
drain tile to the outside.

Most houses in the US fall below the limit, so it isn't normal to see
radon sump.  Due to the vapor barrier and how drains are installed it
usually isn't a problem even in areas where the soil levels are quite
high.

We just did a radon test of the house we're selling (buy it!
http://ubasics.com/house/ ) and you can see the test results here:
http://www.ubasics.com/house/radon.pdf

Shows that the EPA guidelines require less than 4 picocuries per
liter.  I'm interested to know if the regulations are tighter where
you're at, or if the natural levels are higher, or if the home
construction methods simply allow more radiation to seep and collect.

-Adam

On 9/26/06, Joe McCauley <.....joe.mccauleyKILLspamspam.....tcd.ie> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\09\26@143100 by Dave Lag

picon face
James Newtons Massmind wrote:
> I didn't see any mention in the wiki of integrated solar panels as a roofing
> material.
>
> And for an even easier option there is now a peel and stick version. Nice
> article in this months Mother Earth News. Peel and stick the solar panel to
> the metal sheeting, tack it to the roof, cover the peak with a cap. The
> panels interlock and the cap covers the electrical interconnects. Very
> slick.

Which month James? Is the product shipping and available?

2006\09\26@150737 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
Yeah.  It took me 3 sessions of 3-6 hours each to put all this stuff
in and link it as much as I did.  By the time I finished up last night
I was forgetting some items I had already made, and so the linking is
incomplete, and I suspect there are a few items that should be
reclassified, combined, or split.

For instance, I put some window stuff in MoreInsulation and some in
BetterWindows.

About half of the work was done past my bedtime and I'm pretty sure my
brain shut off halfway through.

On 9/26/06, James Newtons Massmind <EraseMEjamesnewtonspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmassmind.org> wrote:
> I didn't see any mention in the wiki of integrated solar panels as a roofing
> material.

It's there, under DreamHouse:
http://www.ubasics.com/home/wiki/SolarEnergy

Although it belongs just as strongly in the building technology
section.  You can also find it through GreenIdea or EfficiencyIdea, or
a search for "solar".  Search box is on the bottom of the page,
though, I think I'd like it near the top.  Like Techref, there's
always 6 ways of finding it, and there's always someone that tries yet
a different way... :-)

> And for an even easier option there is now a peel and stick version. Nice
> article in this months Mother Earth News. Peel and stick the solar panel to
> the metal sheeting, tack it to the roof, cover the peak with a cap. The
> panels interlock and the cap covers the electrical interconnects. Very
> slick.

Added.  Link for article you mention is
www.motherearthnews.com/Alternative_Energy/2006-10-01/Easy_Solar_Power
I'll have to read it later...

> On the Geothermal Heating and Cooling page, there is no mention of earth
> tubes. The Passive Solar Heating and Cooling page makes only passing
> mention. Earth tubes are a really interesting idea in my opinion.
>
> Ah... I see, "Trench Geothermal Cooling"
>
> I would also recommend a lot more interconnection between terms, but that
> takes much work.

This is my first exposure to using a wiki extensively (we use one at
work, but I do minimal editing) so I was doing a lot of things
differently when I finished than when I started.  Even now that it's
mostly entered (though it's always ongoing) I'm thinking about how I
can better accomplish some of my goals for it.

I entered 160 pages over the weekend though (didn't start until
Saturday, really - up until then I was evaluating wiki software).  I
didn't use any of the index features that I now realize would have
made things a little easier.  For instance some names don't have links
because I didn't start linking names of contributers until near the
middle.

Now that I understand how to use the page index better, I would have
liked to have that handy when I was creating pages so it would be
trivial to link appropiate topics together.  At the end I was just
getting tired of it and rather than stop altogether, I just cut back
on the features so I could finish it.  Even if I never get around to
the extenisve linking I'd like, I know it's all searchable and in a
substantially easier form to use than GMail.

I plan on continuing to use it as the project documentation, which is
one of the reasons I'm not allowing others to edit it, though comments
are welcome.

> Overall, its great! I do wish more people would use the wiki abilities of
> piclist.com, but...

The last time I tried it I had a difficult time, and just haven't
looked at its editing features in two years.  The problems I see with
it today are that searching is still very slow (if it's faster to
search your pages using google then there's little point to having
your own search engine - Wikipedia has this problem)  In your case I
don't think google gets every page, but I've never done a comparision
of your search engine against google's for pages on the site.

When I go to http://www.piclist.com it takes 9 seconds on this
connection (a 3Mbps dual T1, with only two users).  When I go to
http://ubasics.com/home/ it takes 2 seconds, and that includes the
redirection to http://ubasics.com/home/.

I wouldn't have done more than a page or two on techref if the edit -
preview - edit cycle was going to be greater than 15 seconds.

The only two other things that kept hitting me when I went to
piclist.com in the past were:
1) sign in was cumbersome, wouldn't keep me signed in, and I kept
getting errors of a dubious nature.  I think the main problem was I
couldn't figure out how to assign my own password, and had to use some
long numeric password that was given.
2) The style, layout, and organization of the site are not comfortable
for me.  I can find what I'm looking for only after looking through a
lot of stuff (much like you found on my site).  This is a usability
problem that shows our sites are designed by and for us, and there are
likely things we could do that would make it more universal.  But it's
pretty subjective.

Now that everything is in, I'm considering the style and layout of the
website.  I'm no usability expert, but I know that everyone is now
trained to expect a navigation bar on the left.  My wiki site needs to
be cleaned up (too much text on the bottom and top), and made as
simple as possible.

Now that I think about it, when I go to http://piclist.com  I
literally have to force myself to read the page line by line to find
what I'm looking for.  There's too much clutter, too many text styles
and various forms of emphasis.  If I want to go looking for pic
algorithms I don't know what to click other than search.  The text
doesn't flow naturally, and there's no index so I can skim the page
itself and drill down to the paragraph I need.

Of course, the next thing you'll tell me is, "Give me some
suggestions!" So I suppose I'll put my money where my mouth is while
it's still wagging.  Here is a layout that, for me, is a bit easier to
read and find what I need.  If I really wanted to work on it I'd
change the style and layout a bit more (specifically the top and
bottom navigation and 'utility' areas).  I really only focussed on the
central content:

http://ubasics.com/piclist

I'll take it down within a week.

No wonder it took 9 seconds for the page to finish loading, though.
You're shoving over 160KB of stuff to the client, then forcing it to
run over 40KB of javascript, and that's just on the home page.  That
would be fine on a 45Mbps connection, but if I remember correctly
you're running on a much slower line.  With the number of users you
have, I imagine it's mostly just data downloading time.  Of course, I
can't talk since my homepage is forcing well over 1MB to the client,
but even then it's only taking 4 seconds here.  Could also be affected
by geography.  Let's see... My server is somewhere in central Florida
right on an internet backbone (OC-3 connection).  I'm using a shared
hosting service, but I suspect my site isn't as hard on the database
and computer as yours is.

I hope I don't sound critical - in the past when people have mentioned
difficulty you've been quick to request more information, so I hope
you find this helpful rather than annoying.

I think that's enough talking for me for now... <whew!>

-Adam

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