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PICList Thread
'[OT] Bondout'
1998\12\08@230819 by Sean Breheny

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Hi All,

I must once again show my ignorance and ask a question:

In the recent message from Tech Tools and in many emulator ads, I have
often seen the term "bondout". What does this mean?

Just going from what it sounds like, I would think it means access to the
die of an IC (you BOND the pin wires to the die), but this doesn't seem to
make sense to me in an emulator.

Thanks,

Sean

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| Sean Breheny                  |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM|
| Electrical Engineering Student|
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1998\12\08@231653 by Tjaart van der Walt

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Sean Breheny wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> I must once again show my ignorance and ask a question:
>
> In the recent message from Tech Tools and in many emulator ads, I have
> often seen the term "bondout". What does this mean?
>
> Just going from what it sounds like, I would think it means access to the
> die of an IC (you BOND the pin wires to the die), but this doesn't seem to
> make sense to me in an emulator.

This is exactly what it is. Usually an 'emulator' is nothing
more than a standard part with bondout connections. These
connections give the rest of the circuitry access to the
internal registers of the chip.

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1998\12\08@232443 by Sean Breheny

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Hi Tjaart et al,

At 06:21 AM 12/9/98 +0200, you wrote:
>
>This is exactly what it is. Usually an 'emulator' is nothing
>more than a standard part with bondout connections. These
>connections give the rest of the circuitry access to the
>internal registers of the chip.
>

Thanks. For some reason (probably because I have never used an ICE, only
software emulators) I thought that most emulators were faster micros
running code that simulated the slower chip(which you actually wanted to
emulate). Of course, this would be imperfect in many ways (different
timing, interrupt differences, etc) and what you say makes lots of sense.

Thanks again,

Sean



+-------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                  |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM|
| Electrical Engineering Student|
+-------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
.....shb7KILLspamspam.....cornell.edu  Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315 ICQ #: 3329174

1998\12\09@122303 by John Payson

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|In the recent message from Tech Tools and in many emulator ads, I have
|often seen the term "bondout". What does this mean?

|Just going from what it sounds like, I would think it means access to the
|die of an IC (you BOND the pin wires to the die), but this doesn't seem to
|make sense to me in an emulator.

The most important function of an emulator is to run code which
resides outside the CPU chip.  Since the address and data busses
are not available externally on most PICs, but clearly exist int-
ernally, a bondout chip is basically a PIC with additional pins
attached to its internal address and data wires.  Although the
chip [die] itself is identical to the normal manufactured part,
the requirement that it be specially packaged with the extra wires
attached makes the unit relatively expensive.  Note also that while
the "normal" bonding areas on the chip are sized and placed so as
to best facilitate production, the extra bonding areas are sized
and placed so as to minimize the cost of having them exist in the
first place; they thus may not be amenable to the high-speed bonding
equipment used for "normal" PIC production.

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