Searching \ for '[OT] Beware IDIOT!! assemblers of PC power connect' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/power.htm?key=power
Search entire site for: 'Beware IDIOT!! assemblers of PC power connect'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] Beware IDIOT!! assemblers of PC power connect'
2004\11\29@025936 by Robert Rolf

picon face
I just put together a new PC with a brand new high end
motherboard and 16X DVD-DL writer. The person who assembled
the power cables reversed the 12V and 5V pins on one of them,
so naturally the drive is now fried (magic smoke is gone),
as is the m/b since the 12V went back down the ATA cable and
smoked the highly integrated interface chip.

What really burns is that this is the exact SAME stupidity
that happened to me 10 years ago and that one blew up a $650
SCSI hard drive. Naturally the dealer who sold me the high end
case refused to do anything about their 'unfit' product since
'we didn't make it'. As a result of their poor response
I took over $10k in ongoing corporate business elsewhere.

**** Please learn from my $300+ stupidity. ****
ALWAYS CHECK that EVERY!!! power cable is wired correctly
before applying power. A voltmeter check is probably also a
good idea since it wouldn't surprise me that the meager
wage Taiwan assemblers would mess up the colors at the
power supply too.

I posted this rant to a local users group list, and
have had enough people reply that they have also
had this happen to THEM that I thought I'd warn
a larger audience of this 'unmentioned' problem.
It doesn't seem to matter whether it is low end or high
end power supplies, assemblers ARE making mistakes and
the Q/C people are NOT catching the errors.

Is this a common problem out there, or have I and the
local computer people just had a lot of bad luck?

Robert
Steaming mad at the idiot assembler and myself
for getting burned yet AGAIN! Complacency is COSTLY.


____________________________________________

2004\11\29@033516 by Jinx

face picon face
> SCSI hard drive. Naturally the dealer who sold me the high end
> case refused to do anything about their 'unfit' product since
> 'we didn't make it'

I thought consumer law meant that the dealer is the person who
fixes the customer. The dealer then has to seek restitution from
the supplier and so on. That's how I'm sure it is in NZ. If I had
an incorrectly wired PSU it wouldn't make nearly as much noise
smoke and sparks as I would at the dealer's counter if he tried
to fob me off. It would surely be in his best interest to check for
other faulty units ?

Commiserations on your PC BTW, that sucks

____________________________________________

2004\11\29@043619 by hid Sheikh

flavicon
face
Sorry to hear of you misfortune. Stuff like this has happened to me
enough times that I don't mess around with trying to build my own pcs
anymore. In the end the frustration just isn't worth it.

With how low the retail manufacturers are selling pcs for its almost not
worth trying to build your own pc unless you want a highly customized
one. Take the Dell Poweredge SC400 for instance. Last year Dell had a
deal on them for $300 ea, free shipping within the US, free upgrade to a
P4 2.8GHz, 40GB HD, 128MB RAM, no OS. Made for a perfect reliable Linux
desktop machine with a bit of additional memory from pricewatch.

I think their latest similar product is the SC420. Makes for a good
desktop.

Have no association with Dell (in fact they are not even my first choice
in PCs) but their prices almost can't be beat. Plus you get that no
hassle warranty.

Shahid

{Original Message removed}

2004\11\29@093938 by Cnc002

picon face
In a message dated 11/29/2004 3:00:48 AM Eastern Standard Time,
spam_OUTRobert.RolfTakeThisOuTspamualberta.ca writes:
I just put together a new PC with a brand new high end
motherboard and 16X DVD-DL writer. The person who assembled
the power cables reversed the 12V and 5V pins on one of them,
so naturally the drive is now fried (magic smoke is gone),
as is the m/b since the 12V went back down the ATA cable and
smoked the highly integrated interface chip.

What really burns is that this is the exact SAME stupidity
that happened to me 10 years ago and that one blew up a $650
SCSI hard drive. Naturally the dealer who sold me the high end
case refused to do anything about their 'unfit' product since
'we didn't make it'. As a result of their poor response
I took over $10k in ongoing corporate business elsewhere.

**** Please learn from my $300+ stupidity. ****
ALWAYS CHECK that EVERY!!! power cable is wired correctly
before applying power. A voltmeter check is probably also a
good idea since it wouldn't surprise me that the meager
wage Taiwan assemblers would mess up the colors at the
power supply too.

I posted this rant to a local users group list, and
have had enough people reply that they have also
had this happen to THEM that I thought I'd warn
a larger audience of this 'unmentioned' problem.
It doesn't seem to matter whether it is low end or high
end power supplies, assemblers ARE making mistakes and
the Q/C people are NOT catching the errors.

Is this a common problem out there, or have I and the
local computer people just had a lot of bad luck?

Robert
Steaming mad at the idiot assembler and myself
for getting burned yet AGAIN! Complacency is COSTLY.
First of all, in many cases the "high end" components such as power supplies
are often manufactured on the exact same assembly lines and at the same time
as the "low end" units.  Therefore you have the same very very low wage people
doing the assembly.  In fact, you will often find the very same components in
both high end and low end units.  I know this from having dis-assembled a
number of both and found the exact same parts in many of them.  I have had the
same thing with a few power supplies but I ALWAYS use a volt meter to check the
pin outs just in case.  This is a "quirk" of being a design engineer and the
technician that also installs the industrial equipment I service and also that
which I design and build.

However, I would probably have caused some sparks at that dealer when he/she
refused to make that good.  I use TigerDirect a lot and, so far, in every case
they have made things right when there was a problem.  

I also agree that unless you need a custom PC (unfortunately for machine
control most of mine are custom) Dell is probably the best overall way to go.  
They are my first choice for off the shelf computers and you can't hardly beat
their prices or their service.

Randy Abernathy
4626 Old Stilesboro Road
Acworth, GA 30101
Ph / Fax: 770-974-5295
E-mail: .....cnc002KILLspamspam@spam@aol.com

I furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for the
SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with my
extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and CNC
machinery to offer you needed support for your machinery.
____________________________________________

2004\11\29@134726 by Peter L. Peres

picon face


On Mon, 29 Nov 2004, Robert Rolf wrote:

> It doesn't seem to matter whether it is low end or high
> end power supplies, assemblers ARE making mistakes and
> the Q/C people are NOT catching the errors.

Were the wire colors right or were thwy swapped ?

Peter
____________________________________________

2004\11\29@141538 by steve

flavicon
face
> I thought consumer law meant that the dealer is the person who
> fixes the customer. The dealer then has to seek restitution from
> the supplier and so on. That's how I'm sure it is in NZ.

I'll find out tomorrow.
I had a noisy fan in my PC and bought a new fancy PSU to get a quiet
fan. I installed it and the PC stopped working. By swapping parts with
another computer, I found that the motherboard, CPU, RAM & video
card were all dead. Hmmm. I must have bumped something, or trapped
a screw under the motherboard, I thought. (I also thought @#$%&).
So I go and buy replacements, put it all together with the old PSU and
we're back in business. Except the fan is noisy. No problem, in goes the
new PSU, turn it on and smoke billows off the motherboard.
Initially the shop were going to replace the parts that blew up the second
time, but then changed their mind and offered just another PSU.
So far, getting a quieter fan has cost me $1200 and a couple of days of
work. We go to court tomorrow.

Steve.



____________________________________________

2004\11\29@144430 by Lawrence Lile

flavicon
face
That's it.  I'm buying a Dell.


-- Lawrence Lile, P.E.
Who used to build his computers from scratch


> {Original Message removed}

2004\11\29@144828 by Robert Rolf

picon face
If the new PSU caused so much damage the first time,
why would you connect it AGAIN before checking that
it's outputs were wired/operating correctly?
This is something the opposing lawyer is going to ask you,
since you have a duty to mitigate your losses.

I have also had a M/B fail because the ATX power connector pins
got so hot they melted and the connector charred.
Turns out that the PSU side had cold solder joints so only
2 pins of 4 were carrying the 40A load. I now coat all
ATX connectors with "Nu-Trol" contact cleaner (M.G. Chemicals)
and haven't had a problem. It would behove others to check their
m/b connectors. If they're hot, you have an impending problem.
Mine were up to 70C before I coated them.

And wouldn't a drop of oil on the fan bushing have
been a LOT cheaper?

Robert
P.S. Thanks for cheering me up <G>. I am not alone...
Humm. This could lead to a new thread on 'most expensive
stupid mistake' <not counting the space program>.

stevespamKILLspamtla.co.nz wrote:

{Quote hidden}

____________________________________________

2004\11\29@150853 by Harold Hallikainen

face picon face
I wonder if this qualifies as "incidental damage?" Most warranties say the
supplier will replace a defective device, but will not replace your house
when the defective device burns it down.

Back when I got my first 286 computer, it came with a defective power
cord. The hot and safety ground were reversed. I plugged it in and got a
loud humming sound and smoke coming out of the monitor (which had its own
correctly wired power cord). The insulation on the ground lead inside the
monitor was melted a bit, but otherwise everything worked fine once I
replaced the defective power cord.

Finally, back in the days of fake datasheets (the Write Only Memory,
etc.), we made a datasheet for the 3AG-NB (no blow) fuse. The datasheet
included a testimonial from a fire chief who said the building burned
down, but the fuse was still good!

Harold



> That's it.  I'm buying a Dell.
>
>
> -- Lawrence Lile, P.E.
> Who used to build his computers from scratch
>
>
>> {Original Message removed}

2004\11\29@162903 by James Newtons Massmind

face picon face
Having just spend over a month trying to get Dell to repair a desktop
machine at work, I don't thing that is a sure decision.

Quick overview: Keyboard stops working, new keyboard has no effect, call
support, they send a guy with new MB (fine so far) He puts in the new MB and
the machine won't boot. I called out the replacement MB, but the tech said
the problem was damaged files on the HD and we would have to reload the OS.
I called Dell and complained, but they refused to do anything other than
walk me through loading the OS. Shrug. Tried to format HD, failed, they
called out defective HD and sent a replacement. Then another. Then another.
Then FINALLY admitted the replacement motherboard had been defective all
along and sent out a replacement with another tech. NOW the machine will
format the HD but by this point they are willing to send a pre-loaded HD.
Which comes a few days later, and is blank. I gave up and reloaded the OS.
Total elapsed time: 1 month 2 days. Total time on phone, etc: 8 hours, 23
min.

I'll give you the case numbers if you like. Of the 4 dells we have
purchased, only one has not suffered some sort of failure. One overheats,
one has a dead floppy drive (DOA), one as mentioned above, and one still
working. Knock on wood. Of the 5 Gateways we purchased, two had video cards
that eventually failed. Not one home built machine has ever failed.

Buying a pre-built machine just ensures that you will have to learn how it
comes apart later on. Might as well build them yourself.

If you don't have the time, it's better to have someone you trust build it
for you. M. Adam Davis
http://www.ubasics.com built my last two servers for me and did an excellent
job. I have more features for less cost and NO problems.

---
James.



{Quote hidden}

____________________________________________

2004\11\29@172853 by steve

flavicon
face
On 29 Nov 2004 at 12:48, Robert Rolf wrote:

> If the new PSU caused so much damage the first time,
> why would you connect it AGAIN before checking that
> it's outputs were wired/operating correctly?

That's a good question.
I had no reason to suspect that the power supply was faulty. It was
brand new, top of the range and covered in QC stickers. The first time it
simply stopped working. My assumption was that I must have done
something wrong (like a dropped screw, shorted on the case, etc). It
wasn't until I put the power supply in the second time, that the cause of
the problems were clear.

> This is something the opposing lawyer is going to ask you,
> since you have a duty to mitigate your losses.

This is a lawyer-free small claims court. Since I described what had
happened and the shopkeeper then went on to connect it to a new
motherboard and killed that, I guess he should have known better too.

I have no idea how we'll go with the claim. I know what I consider to be
right and wrong and what I would do in those circumstances.

Alternatively, it's coming up to Christmas and I could just borrow a
saxophone and a Santa suit and busk outside his store a few times.
Playing a sax can't be that hard can it ?  :-)

Steve.


____________________________________________

2004\11\29@173244 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Mon, 2004-11-29 at 12:48 -0700, Robert Rolf wrote:
> And wouldn't a drop of oil on the fan bushing have
> been a LOT cheaper?

Yes, cheaper, but useless. If the fan is making noise the bearing is
gone. Adding oil will work for a day, maybe two, then the noise will be
back.

There is no choice, once a PS fan starts making noise the fan needs to
be replaced. Whether that means replacing the fan or the whole supply is
up to you.

Letting the supply run in that condition will only result in the fan
eventually failing, usually resulting in the PSU self destructing, which
usually ends up killing some components in your computer as well. TTYL

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

____________________________________________

2004\11\29@175509 by Robert Rolf

picon face
steve@tla.co.nz wrote:
>
> Alternatively, it's coming up to Christmas and I could just borrow a
> saxophone and a Santa suit and busk outside his store a few times.
> Playing a sax can't be that hard can it ?  :-)

Bagpipes aren't that much harder to play, and FAR louder.

R
____________________________________________

2004\11\29@180830 by Lawrence Lile

flavicon
face
I had the same kind of experience with a Hewlett Packard PC.  The suckers sold me an on-site maintenance guarantee (Nya Nya NYA!).  I am 130 miles from the nearest on-site maintenance tech, so he had to make several trips to replace a hard drive, hard drive cable and a CD rom drive (twice!)  

Whenever I have built a PC, I have usually had two weekends of hair pulling, cursing, teeth gnashing and randomly punching out hapless passersby before the *&^$%# thing started working correctly.  

Lets see, I bought a computer off the shelf at Sam's club, it was DOA.

I can truthfully say I have never had a PC that didn't cause trouble at some point early in it's career, homebuilt or factorybuilt. I have never tried a custom built computer, maybe that is the solution!


-- Lawrence Lile, P.E.
Electrical and Electronic Solutions
Project Solutions Companies
http://www.projsolco.com

> {Original Message removed}

2004\11\29@181006 by Lawrence Lile

flavicon
face

> Alternatively, it's coming up to Christmas and I could just borrow a
> saxophone and a Santa suit and busk outside his store a few times.
> Playing a sax can't be that hard can it ?  :-)
>

No, but it will cost him at least $1200 in lost business which might be worth it.  Bring along a hound dog to howl while you play.  


> Steve.
>
>
> ______________________________________________

2004\11\29@185105 by Jake Anderson

flavicon
face
generally when I custom build a PC I assume there will be
roughly 2 mistakes made with it. Typically this is something
like IDE cables swapped around and messing up partitioning of
the hard drive first time round.

setting up a personal PC takes about a day about half of which is taken up
with patching.
a PC for a friend, about half a day (less stuff installed, less patching)

had my first problem with insufficient power lately
went through 3 400W supplies before I got an Antec True Power 550W
for a while I was running 2 PSU's, ATX running the mbo and SCSI HDD and
an old AT supply running all the other drives.
I had originally ordered the PC with a large PSU but none of my regular
suppliers
could get it in stock, eventually I went to another store and they got it
in, in 2 days
(along with a DVD burner).

current system is a Dual Xeon 3.06Ghz 2x80GbIDE 1x36GB 15Krpm Seagate
cheetah (SCSI), Raedeon 9600pro.


problem I typically have with dells is they make me look like a damn fool
if ever I'm called on to repair/upgrade one.
with all their catches and levers and dohickies removing a hard drive is a
puzzle nigh on insurmountable at times. I have once pulled 15 screws out of
one of them only to find out that
there's this little catch behind the drive you lift and twist and the whole
thing pops out.

Also beware of the old dell/all-in-wonder PC tricks
Top of the line CPU, crap everything else.
Pentium 4 3.4Ghz
with an integrated video card sharing system memory
128 mb of ram for it to share
a quantum bigfoot hard drive (cheaper to make but MUCH slower)
bugger all USB, no firewire, slowass chipset

net result, your better off buying a P4 2Ghz for the same price
and it will run at 4x the speed of the dell.



> {Original Message removed}

2004\11\29@204127 by Matthew Fries

flavicon
face
I used to build clone PC's professionally (about 8+ years ago), and I
remember the molex connector problem happening to me once. Problem is that
the power supply QA team probably just looks for CORRECT voltages. They know
that the voltage between the yellow wire and the black one should be 12V.
They didn't notics that the yellow wire was on the wrong side of the connector.

Also, I know what you mean about the Dells. We have a couple hundred of them
at the office. For a corporate environment, It's OK that they have a slow
chipset, crummy integrated video, and shared video memory. Our employees are
supposed to be using Office software, not playing Doom 3. I just wish they
would use better Hard Disks. We have Dells and Gateways, and it seems that
both of those manufacturers LOVE to use Quantum Hard disks. I would gladly
pay the $30 more per machine if they were WD hard drives.

For a home environment Personal Computer, Stay away from the prebuilt
machines you find in a store like Best Buy, and visit your local clone
computer shop. You can get the performance you want, in the case you want,
without being limited by custom motherboards. You can also talk to the
technician who would assemble it, and I'm sure he would have valuable
insight on compatibility and performance.



At 10:51 AM 11/30/2004 +1100, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> {Original Message removed}

2004\11\30@041317 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>That's it.  I'm buying a Dell.

I must admit I have been very pleased with the Dell units I have.
____________________________________________

2004\11\30@042007 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>> Alternatively, it's coming up to Christmas and I
>> could just borrow a saxophone and a Santa suit and
>> busk outside his store a few times.
>> Playing a sax can't be that hard can it ?  :-)
>
>Bagpipes aren't that much harder to play, and FAR louder.

Heh heh. Maybe you could get the guy that used to playa  guitar in K-road,
Auckland. he would be strumming away with one hand, and the other hand that
normally worked the finger board would be doing almost anything else from
rubbing his nose to waving at people he knew going past. :))

____________________________________________

2004\11\30@065812 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Jake Anderson wrote:

> problem I typically have with dells is they make me look like a damn fool
> if ever I'm called on to repair/upgrade one. with all their catches and
> levers and dohickies removing a hard drive is a puzzle nigh on
> insurmountable at times. I have once pulled 15 screws out of one of them
> only to find out that there's this little catch behind the drive you
> lift and twist and the whole thing pops out.

May not help a technician that's called to a customer's site, but I always
found decent (dis)assemble instructions for my Dell notebooks on their site
for anything I could want to take apart.

Gerhard
____________________________________________

2004\11\30@070649 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Lawrence Lile wrote:

> I can truthfully say I have never had a PC that didn't cause trouble at
> some point early in it's career, homebuilt or factorybuilt. I have never
> tried a custom built computer, maybe that is the solution!

I didn't have that many PCs, but I have one that's still a nice system that
I bought over 7 years ago, custom built to my specs by a local computer
builder (in San Diego, at the time). Asus mobo, Matrox graphics, WD
harddisk (well, the disks have been upgraded a few times over the years :),
never gave me any problem at all; not early on, and not now.

And I'm happy with my Dell notebooks, too (two in a row, Inspiron 7500 and
then 8200). The 8200 is my second one; the first one got exchanged
completely because of a mysterious defect that didn't go away even after
exchanging the mobo and the screen. They are a pain on the phone, going
through the required steps until you get down to the problem, but I guess
that's necessary with mass products. This may (or may not :) be easier with
a local shop.

Gerhard
____________________________________________

2004\11\30@075950 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
>> I can truthfully say I have never had a PC that didn't cause trouble at
>> some point early in it's career, homebuilt or factorybuilt.

FWIW: In a prior corporate lifetime I've seen HP, Toshiba and Compaq all go
belly up within days or weeks of supply. One Toshiba on its day :-). HP hard
disk within weeks.


       RM

____________________________________________

2004\11\30@162004 by kimble

flavicon
face
Lawrence Lile wrote:
> That's it.  I'm buying a Dell.

Oh, Dell use non-standard motherboard-frying ATX connector pinouts.
Great fun, that.


kim.
____________________________________________

2004\11\30@170209 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Tue, 2004-11-30 at 21:20 +0000, kimble wrote:
> Lawrence Lile wrote:
> > That's it.  I'm buying a Dell.
>
> Oh, Dell use non-standard motherboard-frying ATX connector pinouts.
> Great fun, that.

Are you sure about that? All Dell's I've opened lately have had standard
ATX connectors and pinouts. TTYL


-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

____________________________________________

2004\11\30@184617 by Dave Lag

picon face
Well, IIRC the Dell connectors were alway standard-ish
Would like to see someone meter one to confirm they've changed to normal
wiring.
D

Herbert Graf wrote:
{Quote hidden}

____________________________________________

2004\11\30@191018 by kimble

flavicon
face
Herbert Graf wrote:

>>Oh, Dell use non-standard motherboard-frying ATX connector pinouts.
>>Great fun, that.
>
> Are you sure about that? All Dell's I've opened lately have had standard
> ATX connectors and pinouts. TTYL

All the Dell parts I have to hand are over 3 years old, and are using
the standard connectors with a proprietary pinout and colour-code.  A
quick google suggests that they've switched to the standard pinout for
at least some of their newer models, so it sounds like they've seen
sense on the matter...

Still, something to be wary of, especially as it's likely to be older
machines needing a replacement PSU (I've always found Dell parts to be
very reliable).


kim.
____________________________________________

2004\11\30@235616 by Cnc002

picon face
In a message dated 11/30/04 7:14:33 PM Eastern Standard Time,
kimspamspam_OUTductilebiscuit.net writes:

> All the Dell parts I have to hand are over 3 years old, and are using
> the standard connectors with a proprietary pinout and colour-code.  A
> quick google suggests that they've switched to the standard pinout for
> at least some of their newer models, so it sounds like they've seen
> sense on the matter...
>
> Still, something to be wary of, especially as it's likely to be older
> machines needing a replacement PSU (I've always found Dell parts to be
> very reliable).
>
>
> kim.
>

The Dell my wife has is about 3 years old and is a Dimension 4500 with a P4
in it.  I had to put a Network Card in it when I networked our house and
everything I saw in it was standard, or appeared to be.  Maybe they have decided to
go with industry standards.

Randy Abernathy

4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101
Ph / Fax: 770-974-5295
E-mail: @spam@cnc002KILLspamspamaol.com

I furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for the
SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with my
extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and CNC
machinery to offer you needed support for your machinery.

____________________________________________


'[OT] Beware IDIOT!! assemblers of PC power connect'
2004\12\01@000606 by Cnc002
picon face
In a message dated 11/29/04 6:52:44 PM Eastern Standard Time,
KILLspamgrooveeeKILLspamspamoptushome.com.au writes:

> Also beware of the old dell/all-in-wonder PC tricks
> Top of the line CPU, crap everything else.
> Pentium 4 3.4Ghz
> with an integrated video card sharing system memory
> 128 mb of ram for it to share
> a quantum bigfoot hard drive (cheaper to make but MUCH slower)
> bugger all USB, no firewire, slowass chipset
>
> net result, your better off buying a P4 2Ghz for the same price
> and it will run at 4x the speed of the dell.
>

Which Dell units were set up like this?  The one we have at home and all of
the ones in the offices of the attorneys where I have helped to set up are NOT
like that.  They have separate video cards, USB yes but about all I use that
for is sometimes a mouse or downloading from a digital camera,etc., we use
networking for most all other applications such as printers, copier
interconnectivity, scanners, etc.

I actually do build most of the PCs I use in my business but when it comes to
offices I have found Dell to work just fine, even for servers.

Just my experience with them.

Randy Abernathy

4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101
Ph / Fax: 770-974-5295
E-mail: RemoveMEcnc002TakeThisOuTspamaol.com

I furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for the
SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with my
extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and CNC
machinery to offer you needed support for your machinery.

____________________________________________

2004\12\01@001216 by Cnc002

picon face
In a message dated 11/29/04 6:09:46 PM Eastern Standard Time,
spamBeGonellilespamBeGonespamprojsolco.com writes:

> had the same kind of experience with a Hewlett Packard PC.  The suckers
> sold me an on-site maintenance guarantee (Nya Nya NYA!).  I am 130 miles from
> the nearest on-site maintenance tech, so he had to make several trips to
> replace a hard drive, hard drive cable and a CD rom drive (twice!)  
>
> Whenever I have built a PC, I have usually had two weekends of hair pulling,
> cursing, teeth gnashing and randomly punching out hapless passersby before
> the *&^$%# thing started working correctly.  
>
> Lets see, I bought a computer off the shelf at Sam's club, it was DOA.
>
> I can truthfully say I have never had a PC that didn't cause trouble at some
> point early in it's career, homebuilt or factorybuilt. I have never tried a
> custom built computer, maybe that is the solution!
>

I have never had any good luck with an HP or Compaq since HP bought them.  As
I said before I build quite a few PCs for use in industrial machine controls
and it usually takes me about 4 hours to assemble them, then about 4 more to
get the operating system and software in them.  However, I have not had much
trouble at all with them.  I usually use Intel Mainboards with Intel chipsets
and Pentium 4 processors.   On occasion I use AMD processors and am actually
starting to lean more toward them than Intel as the last 2 systems I did were AMD
and they seem to run faster and cooler at a given clock rate and front side
bus speed.  Not to mention they are usually cheaper.

Well anyway, that is just my experience.  Of course, I build quite a few of
these as many of the machines I service or upgrade will take from 2 to 5 PCs to
run them.

Randy Abernathy

4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101
Ph / Fax: 770-974-5295
E-mail: TakeThisOuTcnc002EraseMEspamspam_OUTaol.com

I furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for the
SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with my
extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and CNC
machinery to offer you needed support for your machinery.

____________________________________________

2004\12\03@024509 by Peter L. Peres

picon face


On Wed, 1 Dec 2004, Russell McMahon wrote:

>>> I can truthfully say I have never had a PC that didn't cause trouble at
>>> some point early in it's career, homebuilt or factorybuilt.
>
> FWIW: In a prior corporate lifetime I've seen HP, Toshiba and Compaq all go
> belly up within days or weeks of supply. One Toshiba on its day :-). HP hard
> disk within weeks.

Because of the bathtub curve and zero burn-in it is very likely that bulk
purchasers see a lot of problems in the beginning.

Peter
____________________________________________

2004\12\03@185909 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
Jinx,

On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 21:34:29 +1300, Jinx wrote:

> I thought consumer law meant that the dealer is the person who
> fixes the customer. The dealer then has to seek restitution from
> the supplier and so on. That's how I'm sure it is in NZ.

Indeed, and this is certainly the case in English law, because your contract is with the person you bought it
from - you have no business relationship with the manufacturer.

> If I had
> an incorrectly wired PSU it wouldn't make nearly as much noise
> smoke and sparks as I would at the dealer's counter if he tried
> to fob me off. It would surely be in his best interest to check for
> other faulty units ?

I always do a quick "sanity check" that the yellow wires are all on the "outside", furthest from the data
cable on all drives.  That's because I have managed to force one of those darned connectors into place
upside-down, despite the chamfered corners that ought to make it imossible!  It's also worth remembering that
the data and power cables have their red cables adjacent (pin 1 almost always being marked in red on a flat
cable).

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


____________________________________________

2004\12\04@005723 by Morgan Olsson

flavicon
face
Howard Winter 00:59 2004-12-04:
>That's because I have managed to force one of those darned connectors

Speaking of force on the contacts,  I once had a PC that had some strange HD failure, and then i heard the rpm was not stable.
It turned out to be a crack in the solder of the 12V pin on the drive PCB...

BTW theese hard disk power cononnectors are sometimes very lousy, i have had problems with voltage drop also on Y-cable connections.

/Morgan


--
Morgan Olsson, Kivik, Sweden

____________________________________________

2004\12\04@021431 by Jinx

face picon face
sct.staghosting.com/

eg

http://sct.staghosting.com/sct027.html

____________________________________________

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2004 , 2005 only
- Today
- New search...