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'[OT] Best way to back up DVD'
2006\06\26@093403 by John Nall

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I've just purchased a couple of fairly expensive DVD's (one on Yoga
techniques and the other on swimming techniques), both of which will be
heavily used with a lot of stops, pauses, rewinds, etc.
.
What I would like to do is to copy each one to my hard disk, and have an
image stored there, then make a working copy on a DVD-R (my computer has
a DVD-RW drive).   If and when the working copy begins to get scratchy
or have problems, then I can discard it and make another working copy.  
I expect each of the DVD's to be used a lot.
.
Problem is, I've never done this before and don't know what software to
use.  Anyone have any suggestions?  It can be done under either Windows
XP or Linux.  The system (Dell system) came with a program that will
play a DVD (PowerDVD) but I don't think that it will burn one.  I've
googled and there are apparently a lot of commercial packages available,
but  there is no substitute for some advice from someone who has some
hands-on experience.
.
And for the cynical among you -- no, I have no desire whatsoever to make
copies of movies.  We subscribe to NetFlix and that takes good care of
all movie-watching needs.  :-)
.
John

2006\06\26@095752 by Matt Pobursky

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On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 09:34:01 -0400, John Nall wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I recently ran across this same problem myself, wanting to backup a few
precious DVDs and CDs (of which a couple had copy protection).

You'll need some "copy protection beaking" software such as AnyDVD and
CloneDVD sold by these guys:

http://www.slysoft.com/en/

I can recommend their products, they work well and are worth the money.
They also have a 21 day evaluation period which may get you what you
need for free, but I'm not sure what the limitations on the evaluation
versions are.

As for being cynical, I believe in Fair Use rights, regardless of what
the MPAA, RIAA and all the other assorted jokers in Hollywood and the
software business say. As a developer, I'm very ant-piracy. BUT... If
you bought it, I believe you have the right to back it up and copy it
for personal use all you want. If the publishers who oppose this idea
had their way they would require a credit card reader on every computer
and make you swipe your card each time you wanted to play/use their
media or software!

Now that's cynical (but probably true) ;-)

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

(Who once worked for a company whose "unoffical" company flag was the
skull 'n crossbones. Also note Slysoft headquarters is located Europe
and I believe used to be located in the Cayman Islands. No coincidence
there.)

2006\06\26@101727 by Austin

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>John Nall wrote:
>What I would like to do is to copy each one to my hard disk, and
>have an image stored there, then make a working copy on a DVD-R
>(my computer has a DVD-RW drive).   If and when the working
>copy begins to get scratchy or have problems, then I can discard it
>and make another working copy.

Austin replies:

You need to rip the movie to your hard disc with a program that
defeats CSS encryption.  Google 'DVD Decrypter' or 'DVDFab
Decrypter'.  DVD Decrypter is no longer supported, so many
newer movies will need DVDFab Decrypter.

After you rip the movie to the hard drive, you need to burn a copy.
If the files you ripped were from a dual layer DVD (as most movies
are), then they can be as much as 8.5gb.  Use 'DVD Shrink' to
compress down to 4.7gb and burn to a single layer DVD-R.

DVD Shrink and DVDFab Decrypter are both free programs.



2006\06\26@110538 by Herbert Graf

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On Mon, 2006-06-26 at 09:34 -0400, John Nall wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Depending on the country you are in what you are thinking of doing may
be technically illegal.

That said, I personally believe that fair use just makes sense, and the
attempts by the music ang movie people to curb it is both completely
insane and not practical.

The piece of software you are looking for is DVD Shrink. It's main
purpose in life is to backup DVDs to 4.7GB single layer DVD-Rs, but if
you set it to 8.5GB DVD it will do a straight copy to the HD, letting
you play from the hard drive or burn it to a dual layer DVD.

It's free, very quick, and VERY easy to use.

TTYL

2006\06\26@110715 by Goran Hosinsky

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There is a program Alcohol 120 which permits you to make a copy of a
DVD to your hard disk. This copy can then be mounted as a virtual
DVD player and your program will use it just like it was a real DVD.
This leaves your original DVD safe, unused. Also, the reading of
the virtual DVD on the hard disk is a lot faster than a real DVD.

I believe the program is shareware.

Goran

John Nall wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\06\26@155546 by Wayne Topa

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John Nall(spam_OUTjwnallTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com) is reported to have said:
{Quote hidden}

Debian Etch (testing) shows the following packages:

vamps - Tool to recompress and modify the structure of a DVD
k9copy - copy DVD like dvdshrink
xdvdshrink - copies of DVD content on single-layer writable DVDs
libdvd-dev - extract video and audio tracks - devel files
libdvd0 - extract video and audio tracks - runtime files
shrinkta - DVD backup tool

Wayne

--
One person's error is another person's data.
_______________________________________________________

2006\06\26@162309 by Vidal

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John Nall wrote:

>Problem is, I've never done this before and don't know what software to
>use.  Anyone have any suggestions?  It can be done under either Windows
>XP or Linux.  The system (Dell system) came with a program that will
>play a DVD (PowerDVD) but I don't think that it will burn one.  I've
>googled and there are apparently a lot of commercial packages available,
>but  there is no substitute for some advice from someone who has some
>hands-on experience.
>  
>
Simply copy the Audio_ts and Video_ts to your HD. Very easy.
To make a copy  use Nero or any burner software. Nero can do
it without problems.

--
Regards

Vidal

2006\06\26@162906 by Alex Harford

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On 6/26/05, Vidal <.....vidalKILLspamspam@spam@webspeed.dk> wrote:
> John Nall wrote:
>
> >Problem is, I've never done this before and don't know what software to
> >use.  Anyone have any suggestions?
> >
> Simply copy the Audio_ts and Video_ts to your HD. Very easy.
> To make a copy  use Nero or any burner software. Nero can do
> it without problems.

But this method requires that you use a dual layer DVD doesn't it?
DVD Shrink resamples it so it will fit on a single layer DVD-R.

Alex

2006\06\26@164322 by Herbert Graf

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On Sun, 2005-06-26 at 22:23 +0200, Vidal wrote:
> John Nall wrote:
>
> >Problem is, I've never done this before and don't know what software to
> >use.  Anyone have any suggestions?  It can be done under either Windows
> >XP or Linux.  The system (Dell system) came with a program that will
> >play a DVD (PowerDVD) but I don't think that it will burn one.  I've
> >googled and there are apparently a lot of commercial packages available,
> >but  there is no substitute for some advice from someone who has some
> >hands-on experience.
> >  
> >
> Simply copy the Audio_ts and Video_ts to your HD. Very easy.
> To make a copy  use Nero or any burner software. Nero can do
> it without problems.

If the DVD is encrypted that won't work. Almost all commercial DVDs have
DVD encryption enabled.

TTYL

2006\06\26@173034 by Vidal

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Herbert Graf wrote:

{Quote hidden}

You're right. I'd forgotten I had installed AnyDVD. Still it should be
possible to find 'DVD Decrypter' whick I d/l free a while ago.

Or you can use Shrink, it even makes it possible to burn an 8Gb
on a 4 gb disk, well I actually think that's the best idea considering
the costs of 8Gb DVDs.

And it's free.

Read
http://www.dvdshrink.org/what.html

Download:
http://www.softpedia.com/get/CD-DVD-Tools/CD-DVD-Rip-Other-Tools/DVD-Shrink.shtml


--
Regards

Vidal

2006\06\26@183442 by Bob Axtell

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Vidal, you are one year off on your PC clock.

--Bob

Vidal wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\06\27@005037 by Marcel Birthelmer

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for linux, there's also "dvdbackup" and growisofs . dvdbackup takes care of
decrypting and spits out a directory structure suitable for growisofs. Note
that this does not address the dual-layer problem.
- Marcel

{Quote hidden}

2006\06\27@030418 by Ling SM

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> What I would like to do is to copy each one to my hard disk, and have an
> image stored there, then make a working copy on a DVD-R (my computer has
> a DVD-RW drive).   If and when the working copy begins to get scratchy
> or have problems, then I can discard it and make another working copy.  
> I expect each of the DVD's to be used a lot.

I did these do my kids' DVD using cloneDVD.  Until they allow a free 1
to 1 exhange or can train my little ones to protect the discs, I am left
with 2 choices - protect the original, or do not even bother getting
them at all.

Ling SM

2006\06\27@181337 by trossin

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All I can say is go to http://www.videohelp.com and enjoy!
--
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2006\06\30@113001 by Howard Winter

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Slight kink of the topic:  Does anyone know what's required to take a video file (MPEG) from a hard drive and
make a watchable DVD from it?  I realise there are software packages out there to do that, but the requirement
is to make three copies at once, and none of them do anything like that.  

I suppose the easy solution is to make 1 copy and then use a DVD duplicator to make the others, but that's a
bit clumsy and time-consuming (takes more than twice as long as if the three could be made together) and the
client would really like to keep it simple, foolproof (!) and as quick as possible.

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\06\30@135424 by Josh Koffman

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On 6/30/06, Howard Winter <HDRWspamKILLspamh2org.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> Slight kink of the topic:  Does anyone know what's required to take a video file (MPEG) from a hard drive and
> make a watchable DVD from it?  I realise there are software packages out there to do that, but the requirement
> is to make three copies at once, and none of them do anything like that.
>
> I suppose the easy solution is to make 1 copy and then use a DVD duplicator to make the others, but that's a
> bit clumsy and time-consuming (takes more than twice as long as if the three could be made together) and the
> client would really like to keep it simple, foolproof (!) and as quick as possible.

Nero has an option entitled "Use multiple recorders", but I have no
idea what it does as I've never used it.

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
       -Douglas Adams

2006\06\30@220415 by Lee Jones

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>> Slight kink of the topic:  Does anyone know what's required to take
>> a video file (MPEG) from a hard drive and make a watchable DVD from
>> it?  I realise there are software packages out there to do that,

I think what you are looking for is DVD authoring software.  It makes
the watchable-DVD given a video file.

Prior to that, you use video editing software to make the video file,
frequently in DV format.

{Quote hidden}

Nero will make multiple copies at once; one copy per CD/DVD writer
that is installed.  I know it worked with CDs as a friend of mine
used to use it to make distribution disks.

I don't have first hand knowledge of using it to make multiple DVDs
using multiple DVD writers.  Writing 3 DVDs simultaneously requires
a high internal data rate (unless you seriously reduce the DVD write
speed on all the drives).  Make sure the system bus and hard disk
array are up to the task.

Another issue to consider...  I wonder how well Nero's DVD authoring
component interacts with their "use multiple recorders" feature?  You
might have to write the first disk by itself.  Then use the duplicate
feature to write 2 more copies (with 2 DVD writers) during a second
phase of your production cycle.

                                               Lee Jones


'[OT] Best way to back up DVD'
2006\07\01@013912 by Dave Lag
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Howard Winter wrote:
> Slight kink of the topic:  Does anyone know what's required to take a video file (MPEG) from a hard drive and
> make a watchable DVD from it?  I realise there are software packages out there to do that, but the requirement
> is to make three copies at once, and none of them do anything like that.  
>
> I suppose the easy solution is to make 1 copy and then use a DVD duplicator to make the others, but that's a
> bit clumsy and time-consuming (takes more than twice as long as if the three could be made together) and the
> client would really like to keep it simple, foolproof (!) and as quick as possible.
>
> Cheers,
>
>
> Howard Winter
> St.Albans, England
>
>
If it is mpeg-1 then it is VCD and you should be able to burn it on a CD
and many DVD players can play them. SVCD mpeg-2 is less common.
I think fourCC and Gspot are the free programs to check what codecs were
used.


2006\07\13@055340 by Howard Winter

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Dave,

Thanks for the information, and apologies for the slow reply!  From being a theoretical "Is it possible..."
it's now got as far as a definite project, and I have some hardware on which to get it working!

To recap, it's taking video files from Compact Flash cards and copying them onto DVD+/-R...

On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 01:40:08 -0400, Dave Lag wrote:

> If it is mpeg-1 then it is VCD and you should be able to burn it on a CD
> and many DVD players can play them. SVCD mpeg-2 is less common.
> I think fourCC and Gspot are the free programs to check what codecs were
> used.

It will be MPEG-2, and the problem has now changed slightly, to initially just copying the file(s) onto a data
DVD for archiving.  If a "watchable", domestic-style DVD (what is the proper name for this?) is needed, it
will be created from the archive master at a later date in a separate process - I believe the latter is called
"authoring", and splitting it off from the archive-creation makes things much simpler for the development and
for the end users.

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\07\13@060133 by Howard Winter

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Lee,

(Sorry about delayed reply)

On Fri, 30 Jun 2006 19:14:16 -0700, Lee Jones wrote:

> >> Slight kink of the topic:  Does anyone know what's required to take
> >> a video file (MPEG) from a hard drive and make a watchable DVD from
> >> it?  I realise there are software packages out there to do that,
>
> I think what you are looking for is DVD authoring software.  It makes
> the watchable-DVD given a video file.

Right, this area has a whole load of terminology that I'm not yet familiar with!

> Prior to that, you use video editing software to make the video file,
> frequently in DV format.

The video files arrive in the state that they need to be archived, MPEG-2.  As I said to Dave, stage 1 of the
process is now going to be saving two or three copies in exactly the format they arrive, and the authoring
will be a separate process.  This makes things rather easier!

{Quote hidden}

Indeed!  I have seen a machine that was built to copy from a DV tape drive to three DVDs simultaneously, and
the hard drive and 1st DVD were on a motherboard IDE channel each, and the other two DVDs were on USB-IDE
adaptors!  Obviously the developer of that machine found out that IDE channels aren't fast/multitasking enough
to share drives in this application.  I'm glad I saw that, because I would never have thought of doing it that
way myself :-)  SATA may have done a better job, but I don't know if SATA DVD writers are available yet.

> Another issue to consider...  I wonder how well Nero's DVD authoring
> component interacts with their "use multiple recorders" feature?  You
> might have to write the first disk by itself.  Then use the duplicate
> feature to write 2 more copies (with 2 DVD writers) during a second
> phase of your production cycle.

Well luckily this problem doesn't now arise!

Thanks for the help,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


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