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'[OT] Best PC Board Etching Resist Method (was: hp7'
1999\05\20@090040 by Roger Morella

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part 0 2015 bytes content-type:multipart/alternative; boundary="------------BA21757E20F19C42E4C043A0" X-Mozilla-Status2: 00000000 Message-ID: <3742C772.6B6E03FB@buffnet.net> Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 10:15:15 -0400 From: Roger Morella X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.51 [en] (Win98; I) X-Accept-Language: en MIME-Version: 1.0 To: Lawrence Lile Subject: [OT] Best PC Board Etching Resist Method (was: hp7475 PC board plotting ) References: <002301bea07c$9fc18000$5b01010a@6840cck4k019.toastmaster.com> Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------BA21757E20F19C42E4C043A0" If you have a laser printer and want a quick and easy etching resist method, contact Techniks, Inc. in Ringoes, NJ. www.techniks.c om  (908-788-8249)

We have been using their PnP-Blue Pres and Peal iron on printed circuit board transfer film for a couple of years and have have found it to be the best method so far (and we have tried a lot of methods )  This  is an iron on method where you print the board to their transfer film and iron the film onto the surface of the PC board using an ordinary household iron (if your wife won't let you use 'her' iron you can buy one at the local thrift store for about $5).  The result is 2 layers of resist. The film layer and the toner layer.  The combination provides a very high degree of resist which will work very well with fine traces and small holes. The hardest part of the whole process is cleaning the toner off the board after it has been etched (which confirms the integrity of the toner as an etchant resist).

They can be reached at  www.techniks.com& nbsp; or call them at 908-788-8249

The price we paid was $30 for 20 sheets of 8 1/2 by 11  An excellent deal considering the time and frustration we have saved.

Roger Morella
 

1999\05\20@100521 by Benjamin Petersen

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Well they just sold 20 to me ;-)
Thanks

Regards
Benjamin Petersen


> -----Original Message-----
> From: pic microcontroller discussion list
> [spam_OUTPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Roger Morella
> Sent: Thursday, May 20, 1999 3:00 PM
> To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: [OT] Best PC Board Etching Resist Method (was:
> hp7475 PC board
> plotting)]
If you have a laser printer and want a quick and easy etching resist method,
contact Techniks, Inc. in Ringoes, NJ. http://www.techniks.com  (908-788-8249)
We have been using their PnP-Blue Pres and Peal iron on printed circuit
board transfer film for a couple of years and have have found it to be the
best method so far (and we have tried a lot of methods )  This  is an iron
on method where you print the board to their transfer film and iron the film
onto the surface of the PC board using an ordinary household iron (if your
wife won't let you use 'her' iron you can buy one at the local thrift store
for about $5).  The result is 2 layers of resist. The film layer and the
toner layer.  The combination provides a very high degree of resist which
will work very well with fine traces and small holes. The hardest part of
the whole process is cleaning the toner off the board after it has been
etched (which confirms the integrity of the toner as an etchant resist).

They can be reached at  http://www.techniks.com  or call them at 908-788-8249

The price we paid was $30 for 20 sheets of 8 1/2 by 11  An excellent deal
considering the time and frustration we have saved.

Roger Morella

1999\05\20@195322 by D. F. Welch

picon face
<x-rich>For those who like to try new things.


I tried the toner release paper mentioned by Roger

and although it worked reasonably well after I

got the ironing temperature and technique down I

was a bit bothered by the cost.


Recently I tried the backing sheet for Avery

Laser Printer Labels and guess what ... it

worked, IMHO, as well as the blue stuff and

was much cheaper.




At 09:00 AM 5/20/99 -0400, you wrote:

>>>>

<excerpt>

X-Mozilla-Status2: 00000000

Message-ID:

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 10:15:15 -0400

From: Roger Morella

X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.51 [en] (Win98; I)

X-Accept-Language: en

MIME-Version: 1.0

To: Lawrence Lile

Subject: [OT] Best PC Board Etching Resist Method (was: hp7475 PC board
plotting)

References:

Content-Type: multipart/alternative;

boundary="------------BA21757E20F19C42E4C043A0"


If you have a laser printer and want a quick and easy etching resist
method, contact Techniks, Inc. in Ringoes, NJ.
<<http://www.techniks.com>http://www.techniks.com  (908-788-8249)<<http://www.techniks.com>


We have been using their PnP-Blue Pres and Peal iron on printed circuit
board transfer film for a couple of years and have have found it to be
the best method so far (and we have tried a lot of methods )  This  is an
iron on method where you print the board to their transfer film and iron
the film onto the surface of the PC board using an ordinary household
iron (if your wife won't let you use 'her' iron you can buy one at the
local thrift store for about $5).  The result is 2 layers of resist. The
film layer and the toner layer.  The combination provides a very high
degree of resist which will work very well with fine traces and small
holes. The hardest part of the whole process is cleaning the toner off
the board after it has been etched (which confirms the integrity of the
toner as an etchant resist).


They can be reached at  <<http://www.techniks.com>http://www.techniks.com  or call them
at 908-788-8249


The price we paid was $30 for 20 sheets of 8 1/2 by 11  An excellent deal
considering the time and frustration we have saved.


Roger Morella



</excerpt><<<<<<<<






Daniel F. Welch


Director

Research and Development

American Scientific Associates

Email: amerscispamKILLspamflash.net

</x-rich>

1999\05\20@230708 by Stuart O'Reilly

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What sort of track width were you able to get down to? Did you have to use a lot
of preasure with the iron to get the toner to stick? I'm interested in using th
is method but I've tried one brand of paper with very poor results

Regards
Stuart

D. F. Welch wrote:

{Quote hidden}

lotting)
>      References:
>      Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
>      boundary="------------BA21757E20F19C42E4C043A0"
>
>      If you have a laser printer and want a quick and easy etching resist meth
od, contact Techniks, Inc. in Ringoes, NJ. <http://www.techniks.com>http://www.techniks.com (9
08-788-8249)<http://www.techniks.com>
>
>      We have been using their PnP-Blue Pres and Peal iron on printed circuit b
oard transfer film for a couple of years and have have found it to be the best m
ethod so far (and we have tried a lot of methods ) This is an iron on method whe
re you print the board to their transfer film and iron the film onto the surface
of the PC board using an ordinary household iron (if your wife won't let you us
e 'her' iron you can buy one at the local thrift store for about $5). The result
is 2 layers of resist. The film layer and the toner layer. The combination prov
ides a very high degree of resist which will work very well with fine traces and
small holes. The hardest part of the whole process is cleaning the toner off th
e board after it has been etched (which confirms the integrity of the toner as a
n etchant resist).
>
>      They can be reached at <http://www.techniks.com>http://www.techniks.com or call them at
908-788-8249
>
>      The price we paid was $30 for 20 sheets of 8 1/2 by 11 An excellent deal
considering the time and frustration we have saved.
{Quote hidden}

1999\05\21@003313 by D. F. Welch

picon face
At 01:08 PM 5/21/99 +1000, you wrote:
>What sort of track width were you able to get down to? Did you have to use
a lot of pressure with the iron to get the toner to stick? I'm interested
in using this method but I've tried one brand of paper with very poor results
>

I've gotten line widths in the neighborhood of .015"

You need to experiment with temperature, time and pressure
and make sure the board is clean first and cold before you
try to remove the paper.  Soaking the board and paper in
water after it is cool tends to help ease separation of the
paper from the toner.  Different toners have different
melting points so iron temp needs to match your toner's
melting point so that it fuses properly to the board.  Also the board has
to come up to the toners fusing temperature
before you remove the heat.

Both with the Avery label release paper and the commercial
paper you probably won't have perfect success the first few times.

There is a firm that offers a modified laminating machine for about $300
which offers much more control than the iron and
presumably would increase your success but I haven't
tried it so I can't specifically recommend it.

See:
     http://www.dynaart.com/E.DTF2.html

-Dan
{Quote hidden}

board plotting)
>>      References:
>>      Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
>>      boundary="------------BA21757E20F19C42E4C043A0"
>>
>>      If you have a laser printer and want a quick and easy etching
resist method, contact Techniks, Inc. in Ringoes, NJ.
<http://www.techniks.com>http://www.techniks.com (908-788-8249)<http://www.techniks.com>
>>
>>      We have been using their PnP-Blue Pres and Peal iron on printed
circuit board transfer film for a couple of years and have have found it to
be the best method so far (and we have tried a lot of methods ) This is an
iron on method where you print the board to their transfer film and iron
the film onto the surface of the PC board using an ordinary household iron
(if your wife won't let you use 'her' iron you can buy one at the local
thrift store for about $5). The result is 2 layers of resist. The film
layer and the toner layer. The combination provides a very high degree of
resist which will work very well with fine traces and small holes. The
hardest part of the whole process is cleaning the toner off the board after
it has been etched (which confirms the integrity of the toner as an etchant
resist).
>>
>>      They can be reached at <http://www.techniks.com>http://www.techniks.com or call
them at 908-788-8249
>>
>>      The price we paid was $30 for 20 sheets of 8 1/2 by 11 An excellent
deal considering the time and frustration we have saved.
{Quote hidden}

1999\05\21@005523 by Bob Blick

face
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I also use the blue, it works the best for me. I've tried all the other
home methods.

Lacquer thinner takes it right off. or maybe the fumes just make it seem
like it takes no time :-) I don't recall...

Cheers,
Bob

{Quote hidden}

1999\05\21@150830 by Thomas McGahee

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To remove the toner from the PC board once it has been etched I use
a few drops of methyl ethyl ketone, also known as acetone. Since it is one of th
e
main ingredients in fingernail polish remover, you can always use
*that* stuff, and it is readily available.

Apply a few drops, making sure that you spread it to cover the entire
foil side of the board. Give it about ten seconds to do it's thing
before removing with a piece of ScotchBrite pad. Then rinse in water.

This chemical will attack many plastics and most paints, so it is
best to have a glass or metal pan under it to prevent damage to
your table top.

Watch out for the fumes. Use good ventialation and avoid open flames,
sparks, and the like.

Fr. Tom McGahee

----------
> From: Bob Blick <bblickspamspam_OUTSABER.NET>
> To: @spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OT] Best PC Board Etching Resist Method (was: hp7475 PCboard
         plotting)]
{Quote hidden}

1999\05\22@030658 by electme

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hi picsters,
i just used normal a4 paper & printed the pcb circuit on it.
the printer used was my NEC silentwriter LC 890.
i used a normal flat  clothes iron.
the one i use to iron my shirts with !
had no problems except for the temp.as stated ,
how long to leave it applied to the paper for in order for the toner to adhere t
o the board.
put the board with paper together in water & worked off the paper.CAREFULLY!!!!

thinner tracks were SOMETIMES a bit more of a problem.
sometimes they didn't quite take all the way.
i just used a needle
( that i sew my buttons on with when they fall or get ripped off)
& nail polish.
to clean up the tracks i repaired , i used a razor blade !

BTW, for a fast proto pcb , nailpolish IS EXCELLENT !!
i've don it many times.
remove with acetone or steel wool once etched

presto.
cheap'n nas\ty.

i read a top thread from this list a while ago about making use of what you have
cost reductions etc . i think it was paul webster & co who added input.
(sorry if i'm wrong , paul , just going from memory)
glen
******************

D. F. Welch wrote:

{Quote hidden}

lotting)
>      References:
>      Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
>      boundary="------------BA21757E20F19C42E4C043A0"
>
>      If you have a laser printer and want a quick and easy etching resist meth
od, contact Techniks, Inc. in Ringoes, NJ. <http://www.techniks.com>http://www.techniks.com (9
08-788-8249)<http://www.techniks.com>
>
>      We have been using their PnP-Blue Pres and Peal iron on printed circuit b
oard transfer film for a couple of years and have have found it to be the best m
ethod so far (and we have tried a lot of methods ) This is an iron on method whe
re you print the board to their transfer film and iron the film onto the surface
of the PC board using an ordinary household iron (if your wife won't let you us
e 'her' iron you can buy one at the local thrift store for about $5). The result
is 2 layers of resist. The film layer and the toner layer. The combination prov
ides a very high degree of resist which will work very well with fine traces and
small holes. The hardest part of the whole process is cleaning the toner off th
e board after it has been etched (which confirms the integrity of the toner as a
n etchant resist).
>
>      They can be reached at <http://www.techniks.com>http://www.techniks.com or call them at
908-788-8249
>
>      The price we paid was $30 for 20 sheets of 8 1/2 by 11 An excellent deal
considering the time and frustration we have saved.
{Quote hidden}

1999\05\23@151314 by ranguelo

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face
Hi !


I have tried the toner transfer method for several boards. I had
to experiment many times until i got acceptable results. It depends on
many parameters.

Some hints from my experience:

- The Board:
After cleaning the board from oil and dirt pre etch it by putting it
in the etchant (FeCl3) for 0,5 to 3 seconds (depends on temperature and
etchant quality) and immediately wash it with clear water. The toner
sticks much better to such a surface.

- The Paper:
I have tried different papers and foils, including a special foil called
'TEC2000' for toner transfer.
The best results i got were with Hewlett Packard 'non-glossy plotter
paper'. I suppose for good results the paper have to be with a glossy
surface where the hot toner stays on the surface and doesn't suck deep
into the paper.
Could never try the products mentioned on the list since i couldn't find
them here in Germany.

- The Toner:
I noticed newer 600 dpi laser printers use fine grained toner and bring
less toner on the paper. Older 300 dpi printer worked better for me.

- The transfer method:
The result depends highly on temperature, pressure and duration of the
transfer process.

I am using an Iron hold upside down in a vice. Then put the board on it
with the cooper side upward and press the printed paper with a rubber
roller.

I want to replace the iron by a hot plate with a temperature
controller (PIC-based with PID algorithm :-)

It is important always to apply the heat on the one side and transfer
the toner on the other side.

- The Results:
I have done a double side 100 x 160 mm board.
The board is usable but i can't say it's perfect.

The result is acceptable until it's cheap. If I would be going to spent
money for PCB equipment i would bye an UV exposure unit and use
ready made pre-coatet boards.



St.

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