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'[OT] A wierd moment.'
2006\07\16@160109 by David VanHorn

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I was just re-reading the andromeda strain, in a ballantine paperback, and
found that an interesting part of the book had been changed!

In the beginning of the original book, and IIRC the movie, manchek dials the
binary of 222, represented MSB first as 1-101-1110
As a teenager, I tried that number from a military base, and I did get
someone who answered "Military Emergency".  At that point, I hung up the
phone and rapidly made myself elsewhere.  This would have been around
1972-1976, in hawaii

Now in the new book, a 1993 edition, the number is presented LSB first, and
is the binary of 87.
The "in case of fire" sign has been changed to read "In case of fire, notify
division 87, Emergencies only"

Creepy.
Why would they go to the effort to change something like that, unless there
was a reason?

--
Feel the power of the dark side!  Atmel AVR

2006\07\16@163824 by Jack Smith

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Dave:

I have a copy of the First Edition hardcover in my hands, purchased it
new on June 18th 1969 according to my note inside.

It says:

IN CASE OF FIRE
Notify Division 87
Emergencies Only

This is decoded (LSB first) by Manchek as:

1-110-1010

So, I don't know where your 222 comes from.


Jack K8ZOA



David VanHorn wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\07\16@164905 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> Why would they go to the effort to change something like
> that, unless there was a reason?

You must be an american, in the USA-citizen sense? On this side of the
pond we (OK, maybe that's only me) say "don't attribute to anything more
complicated what can be attributed to simple human
error/lazyness/greed/etc". Sort of Occam meets Murphy.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\07\16@174022 by David VanHorn

picon face
>
> You must be an american, in the USA-citizen sense? On this side of the
> pond we (OK, maybe that's only me) say "don't attribute to anything more
> complicated what can be attributed to simple human
> error/lazyness/greed/etc". Sort of Occam meets Murphy.


Guilty as charged, and a navy brat at that.

But, why would they change it?
I've looked it up through google, and others have documented the division
222 version, so I'm not imagining that.  It may be the movie I got it from,
it was a lot of years ago.

2006\07\16@174305 by David VanHorn

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I'm not crazy, at least not THAT crazy. :)

www.directessays.com/viewpaper/91389.html

2006\07\16@180047 by Jack Smith

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If you give me your mailing address, I'll send you a copy of  the page
from the 1st edition (1969) that says Division 87.

Jack



David VanHorn wrote:
> I'm not crazy, at least not THAT crazy. :)
>
> www.directessays.com/viewpaper/91389.html
>  

2006\07\16@190536 by David VanHorn

picon face
On 7/16/06, Jack Smith <spam_OUTJack.SmithTakeThisOuTspamcox.net> wrote:
>
> If you give me your mailing address, I'll send you a copy of  the page
> from the 1st edition (1969) that says Division 87.


I'm not disbelieving you, but I know that in some version, it was 222.
I'm just wondering why anyone would change that, since as a work of fiction,
all it needs to do is LOOK believable.

2006\07\16@191208 by Jinx

face picon face
> I'm not crazy, at least not THAT crazy. :)

You're crazy when they say you are. And you're crazy 'round
about (looks intently at watch)........

Meanwhile, outside Dave's house, MIB arrive in black MIB
panel van. A doctory-looking man is with them


2006\07\16@191652 by Lee Jones

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face
[ Andromeda Strain]

>> But, why would they change it?
>> I've looked it up through google, and others have documented the
>> division 222 version, so I'm not imagining that.  It may be the
>> movie I got it from, it was a lot of years ago.

> If you give me your mailing address, I'll send you a copy of
> the page from the 1st edition (1969) that says Division 87.

In my papeback copy, Third Dell Printing -- July 1970, it was
Division 222.  As described, it's a telephone number encoded in
binary.  222 translates to 1-101-1110 (page 31-32 of paperback).
That's not a normal telephone number.

Division 87, if translated the same way, would be 101-0111.  A
more reasonable telephone number.  Maybe people were dialing it.
Or maybe it was _too_ close to reality and was a slip by one of
Chrichton's sources.  We'll probably never know.

                                               Lee Jones

2006\07\16@200226 by Jack Smith

picon face


Lee Jones wrote:
{Quote hidden}

It might be a legit AUTOVON telephone number, circa 1970. I know that
system had some unusual telephone numbers in addition to the normal
xxx-xxxx series.


Jack

2006\07\16@201116 by David VanHorn

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>
>
> It might be a legit AUTOVON telephone number, circa 1970. I know that
> system had some unusual telephone numbers in addition to the normal
> xxx-xxxx series.


I know the base I tried it on had autovon.

2006\07\17@100400 by Howard Winter

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Dave,

On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 17:40:22 -0400, David VanHorn wrote:

{Quote hidden}

As a matter of interest, 222 is the "Crash Call" number on internal phones in UK hospitals.  Coincidence?  :-)

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\07\17@123836 by Peter

picon face

On Sun, 16 Jul 2006, David VanHorn wrote:

>> You must be an american, in the USA-citizen sense? On this side of the
>> pond we (OK, maybe that's only me) say "don't attribute to anything more
>> complicated what can be attributed to simple human
>> error/lazyness/greed/etc". Sort of Occam meets Murphy.
>
> Guilty as charged, and a navy brat at that.
>
> But, why would they change it?
> I've looked it up through google, and others have documented the division
> 222 version, so I'm not imagining that.  It may be the movie I got it from,
> it was a lot of years ago.

Given the number of bozos who actually dial numbers which appear in
novels and scifi stories, I would expect the ITU to issue a set of
numbers that are guaranteed NOT to work, for worldwide use ...

Peter

2006\07\17@134215 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face
Peter wrote:

> Given the number of bozos who actually dial numbers which appear in
> novels and scifi stories, I would expect the ITU to issue a set of
> numbers that are guaranteed NOT to work, for worldwide use ...
>
> Peter

In North America, NANPA declared the "555" NXX for this purpose
(kinda)... see the specs.

Other than 555-1212 which is directory assistance, very few 555 numbers
"go anywhere".

But it's not (and never will be) an ITU issue, it's up to the telco
operators in each country to set their own numbering standards.

Nate

2006\07\18@030600 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Given the number of bozos who actually dial numbers which appear in
>novels and scifi stories, I would expect the ITU to issue a set of
>numbers that are guaranteed NOT to work, for worldwide use ...

I always thought that was what happens to 555 .... numbers that are quoted
in US TV and films.

2006\07\18@040058 by Dan Smith

face picon face
On 7/18/06, Alan B. Pearce <.....A.B.PearceKILLspamspam@spam@rl.ac.uk> wrote:
> I always thought that was what happens to 555 .... numbers that are quoted
> in US TV and films.

Ofcom provide the equivalent in the UK - see
http://www.ofcom.org.uk/telecoms/ioi/numbers/num_drama#content

Dan

2006\07\18@135246 by Peter

picon face

On Mon, 17 Jul 2006, Nate Duehr wrote:

> Peter wrote:
>
>> Given the number of bozos who actually dial numbers which appear in novels
>> and scifi stories, I would expect the ITU to issue a set of numbers that
>> are guaranteed NOT to work, for worldwide use ...
>>
>> Peter
>
> In North America, NANPA declared the "555" NXX for this purpose (kinda)...
> see the specs.
>
> Other than 555-1212 which is directory assistance, very few 555 numbers "go
> anywhere".
>
> But it's not (and never will be) an ITU issue, it's up to the telco operators
> in each country to set their own numbering standards.

The ITU is about the only body that might, under certain circumstances,
tell telcos all over the world that it might be good if a certain set
of numbers would not be allocated because they are going to be used in
novels, scifi zines, movies and radio shows which will reach 200 million
people a year, and 0.1% of those are SURE to call those numbers at some
time or another.

Peter

2006\07\18@140356 by Peter

picon face

On Tue, 18 Jul 2006, Alan B. Pearce wrote:

>> Given the number of bozos who actually dial numbers which appear in
>> novels and scifi stories, I would expect the ITU to issue a set of
>> numbers that are guaranteed NOT to work, for worldwide use ...
>
> I always thought that was what happens to 555 .... numbers that are quoted
> in US TV and films.

I think I saw 555 numbers somewhere. Something commercial.

Peter

2006\07\18@144303 by Robert Rolf

picon face
(areacode)-555-1212 is international directory assistance.
e.g. 411 (information North America) for the dialed time zone.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/555-1212

The 555 prefix seems to be reserved for non customer phone services.

electronics.howstuffworks.com/question659.htm
There are 680 usable area codes in the United States, of which 215
are currently in use. Each area code has 7,920,000 telephone numbers
(out of a possible 10,000,000) available within it. Some numbers,
such as those that would start with 0,1 or 911, are unavailable
for use. Others, like 555, which is used as a prefix for fake phone
numbers in movies and on TV, are reserved for special use.

R

Peter wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\07\25@153801 by Nate Duehr

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face
Peter wrote:
> On Tue, 18 Jul 2006, Alan B. Pearce wrote:
>
>>> Given the number of bozos who actually dial numbers which appear in
>>> novels and scifi stories, I would expect the ITU to issue a set of
>>> numbers that are guaranteed NOT to work, for worldwide use ...
>> I always thought that was what happens to 555 .... numbers that are quoted
>> in US TV and films.
>
> I think I saw 555 numbers somewhere. Something commercial.

You might be thinking of the aborted attempt by AT&T in the 90's to
create "follow-me" numbers with NPA-500-XXXX.

Never really went anywhere.

Nate

2006\07\26@030455 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Jul 16, 2006, at 4:05 PM, David VanHorn wrote:
>
> I'm not disbelieving you, but I know that in some version, it was
> 222.  I'm just wondering why anyone would change that, since as
> a work of fiction, all it needs to do is LOOK believable.
>
I remember 222, but in two early versions of the book I read, there
was DIFFERENT text for how to do the binary conversion, at least
one of which was quite wrong (perhaps just the LSB-first issue
mentioned, but it definitely didn't match the binary conversion
we were doing in school.)

From most american phones, dialing any combination of 1s and 0s
gets you the operator.  Especially in the timeframe the book was
first published.  The 1's are essentially ignored...

BillW

2006\07\26@142410 by David VanHorn

picon face
>
> I remember 222, but in two early versions of the book I read, there
> was DIFFERENT text for how to do the binary conversion, at least
> one of which was quite wrong (perhaps just the LSB-first issue
> mentioned, but it definitely didn't match the binary conversion
> we were doing in school.)


I just got the Dell version, 0199 no bar code (!) 440-001990-125 on the
spine, which calls it out as 222, and does the conversion to binary as MSB
left.

ost american phones, dialing any combination of 1s and 0s
gets you the operator.  Especially in the timeframe the book was
first published.  The 1's are essentially ignored...

NOT on the phone I tried it on, on base.

=8-0

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