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'[OT] Solder LEAD poisoning - an ALERT ?'
2002\12\13@151954 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Hi, at any industry where employees should contact solder material, gloves
is a must to avoid lead contact. Considering 8 hours a day contact with
such solder material, it is a least precaution to have.

But lets talk about you and me, home hobby electronics, where you can not
account with certain numbers how many hours in your life you already hold a
solder wire, direct contact with lead.

Suppose you have 40 years old, dealing with solder since 15. That's 25
years, 6 thousand days (considering only 70% of the time) of lead contact,
imagine you hold the solder wire for 10 minutes a day, that's an incredible
time of 60 thousand minutes you kept holding a lead wire on your hands.
One thousand hours, or the equivalent of 41 days. Imagine you wrap a solder
wire in your hand, and leave there for 41 days.

How much lead poison did you acquire already?

Is there any way to measure it?  to evaluate how much damage it can made
already?
Is there any way to clean this up from the body?

I think it is a good discussion point.
What kind of easy use gloves we can use to avoid lead contact.
Regular and simple cloth gloves are enough?

I think that the only gloves you WILL use at home is the one that is easy
to vest, not a pain in the neck as the doctor's gloves, but some that will
not pester you when dealing with small components.

What about using some kind of conduit to hold the solder wire?

What is the real danger here?

Wagner.

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2002\12\13@153549 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 03:14 PM 12/13/02 -0500, you wrote:
>Hi, at any industry where employees should contact solder material, gloves
>is a must to avoid lead contact. Considering 8 hours a day contact with
>such solder material, it is a least precaution to have.

The main thing is to WASH your HANDS after handling wire solder, PCBs
and especially solder paste before you eat. Don't eat in the same
place as you do soldering. Try not to breath the fumes from soldering,
a small fan helps (though it's probably mostly the flux).

Additional precautions should be observed by women who might be pregnant.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
spam_OUTspeffTakeThisOuTspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com

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2002\12\13@154840 by SM Ling

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> >Hi, at any industry where employees should contact solder material,
gloves
> >is a must to avoid lead contact. Considering 8 hours a day contact with
> >such solder material, it is a least precaution to have.

Maybe these links are useful:

http://my.webmd.com/encyclopedia/article/4115.16470#hw119529

http://my.webmd.com/encyclopedia/article/4115.16469#hw119536

I used to come across an article about "Soldering" on the same site but
could not locate it now.

Cheers, Ling SM

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2002\12\13@160102 by Paul Hutchinson

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Lead is not easily absorbed through the skin which is why OSHA does not
require gloves (at least not as of the last time I checked the regulations).
The primary route of entry for lead in solder is ingestion through eating or
smoking while soldering. There is a warning label on rolls of solder warning
you to wash your hands before eating or smoking. The bigger danger from
soldering is the fumes from the flux.

The big problem with lead is children and pregnant women. If they eat enough
lead the child will have brain damage and other health problems. This is why
there are laws banning lead paint on mouthable surfaces. At one time the
congress was going to ban lead in electronic solder but the EIA helped them
understand that for children to get lead from PCB's the parents must be
letting them suck on or eat the circuit boards.

Another area of concern is lead in water, this is why lead has been banned
from solder used for water pipes in most states.

As for testing any doctor can give you a simple blood test to determine your
lead exposure.

The National Safety Council fact sheet is a good summary.
http://www.nsc.org/library/facts/lead.htm

Paul

> {Original Message removed}

2002\12\13@175947 by John Hansen

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I gave up leaded solder a few years back.  Currently I use Kester's
SAF-A-LLOY, which contains no lead.  There are a couple of drawbacks.  My
impression (casual empiricism only) is that the melting point is a little
bit higher.  When the connection cools it is not shiny like it is with lead
solder, but instead looks slightly dull (sort of like a cold solder joint
does when you use lead).  And it costs more.  I pay about $18 a pound for
the stuff, but a pound lasts me a very long time and there's substantial
peace of mind in knowing I'm not using lead.  There are days when I'm
working on a project where I solder for 3-4 hours at a time.  Not having
lead is nice.

John Hansen

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2002\12\13@182319 by John Ferrell

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Not to down play the risks BUT...

There are a lot of us around that have used solder for the last 50 years.
Most of us at some time or other have pulled a little more solder off the
roll with our teeth because we were out of hands. Of course most of us
remembered not to do that with the acid core stuff. Also, the quantities of
solder we used as technicians were a lot larger then.

When I was a kid we melted toothpaste tubes for the lead. Isn't it
interesting how quietly those toothpaste tubes disappeared?

On the other hand, I can remember being smarter than I seem to be now...

John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"



{Original Message removed}

2002\12\14@065840 by Russell McMahon

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> On the other hand, I can remember being smarter than I seem to be now...

I've done a lot off soldering, and I can't remember being smarter than I am
now .... :-)

       RM

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2002\12\14@113205 by Mike Singer

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Russell McMahon wrote:
> > On the other hand, I can remember being smarter than
> > I seem to be now...
>
> I've done a lot off soldering, and I can't remember being
> smarter than I am now .... :-)

  Too much soldering: you even can't remember.

  Mike :-)

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2002\12\14@143554 by John Ferrell

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Yes, it probably affects memory as well. I spend a lot of time looking for
stuff too.
John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"



{Original Message removed}

2002\12\14@160434 by Peter L. Peres

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On Fri, 13 Dec 2002, Wagner Lipnharski wrote:

*>Hi, at any industry where employees should contact solder material, gloves
*>is a must to avoid lead contact. Considering 8 hours a day contact with
*>such solder material, it is a least precaution to have.

If you are in a production environment you need to worry about it.
Otherwise not really. There were several discussions about this and there
is data on the web. Try MSDS (?) sheet for lead. Lead as such is not a
danger (metallic solid lead). Things change when you deal with lead vapor,
dust (which reacts chemically with lots of things, like sweat for example)
lead in contact with certain organic materials (like acid flux - not
normally used in electronics) and when you have things like wave soldering
machines and solder (tinning) pots around with inoperating or broken
exhaust systems.

You can have the lead level measured if you suspect poisoning.

Peter

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2002\12\14@195427 by Russell McMahon

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> Lead as such is not a
> danger (metallic solid lead). Things change when you deal with lead vapor,


Interestingly, people who fire fire-arms a lot often show detectable effects
of lead poisoning, presumably from lead vapourised during firing.


       Russell McMahon

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2002\12\14@225302 by robert nelson

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A good place to look for is lead intake warnings is National Rifle
Association site.  They used to have a lot of info and safety stuff on
it.  A lot of indoor handgun shooters were getting high levels and they
were worried about it 25 years ago due to the almost pure lead bullets
hitting the metal back stop and putting lead dust in the air.  When we
were melting lead to cast our own bullets we would put charcoal on the
top of the molten lead in the lead pots to keep the airborne lead levels
down.

Bob Nelson

John Ferrell wrote:

>Yes, it probably affects memory as well. I spend a lot of time looking for
>stuff too.
>
>
(snip)

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2002\12\15@162621 by Rick C.

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As a certified firearms and instructor, I cover this in my courses I teach. It's
not unusual for us to shoot around 3000 rounds in a session. After a shooting
session one must was their hands as soon as possible, not eat at the range, and
change clothes and wash hair as soon as convenient. Interesting to note that the
lead concern doesn't come from the bullet as much as the primer. They have come
up with leadless primers but they cost a good bit more. Also, "safe" bullets are
now being manufactured using copper and zinc. Sometimes I cast about 1200
bullets in a weekend and I do it outside where there is less buildup of lead
vapors and the antimony that contains arsenic. I routinely am tested and have no
abnormal amounts of lead in my blood. My left eye wanders a little and the hair
has fallen out of one side of my head........just kidding. ;-)
Rick - NRA-CFI, Reloading instructor

Russell McMahon wrote:

> > Lead as such is not a
> > danger (metallic solid lead). Things change when you deal with lead vapor,
>
> Interestingly, people who fire fire-arms a lot often show detectable effects
> of lead poisoning, presumably from lead vapourised during firing.
>

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2002\12\15@175323 by Dr Martin Hill

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Rick,
 You wouldn't happen to be in the US would you?  It's the only place I can
think of that would come up with "safe" bullets because they are worried
about people getting poisoned by them....

Martin

{Original Message removed}

2002\12\15@182134 by Rick C.

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Yes, in Virginia. Sounds wierd doesn't it? Safe bullets? Safe to whom? The
reason for the "safe" ammunition is that indoor ranges would not have the wrath
of the EPA down on them on a regular basis. It is impossible to build a new
indoor range without a quarter million dollars worth of air filtration and
scrubbing equipment. When the walls are periodically washed, all the soiled
water has to be contained and carried away by authorized recyclers at an
enormous cost. Totally lead free ammunition bypasses almost all of these
requirements.
Rick

Dr Martin Hill wrote:

> Rick,
>   You wouldn't happen to be in the US would you?  It's the only place I can
> think of that would come up with "safe" bullets because they are worried
> about people getting poisoned by them....
>
> Martin

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2002\12\16@011146 by electronic.services

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After 20+ years in this line of work I have had my blood tested for lead
and other heavy metals. Results came back with no detectable levels.
What a relief. The main danger is not from the metal solid but from vapours.

Cheers.

Nino.

Wagner Lipnharski wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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