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'[OT] [EE] Unfused printouts <-- PC board transfer'
2000\05\23@085716 by Russell McMahon

picon face
Here's a trick which MAY be useful. Like all the best ideas, I discovered it
by accident - in this case while trying to print an envelope short side in.

If you cut a sheet of paper to less than a certain length (the exact length
will vary with your printer) and feed it to a laser printer, then the feed
rollers after the toner deposition stage will (may?) fail to pick it up and
the paper will stop in the midst of the printer without having been fused.

I have an old HP4L that I normally use and if I feed it a half sheet it sits
nicely in the printer until I remove the toner cartridge and take it out.
You now have an unfused smudge free copy waiting to be transferred to
something else.

I haven't tried this for PCB work but I have used it to transfer toner to
mugs and then baked them in a domestic oven to produce a surprisingly robust
finish.
I have also transferred pictures from a scanner to a plastic surface by this
method.
YMWV

This would be very easy for someone to try for PCB purposes - if you do
please  let us know the results!

You could perhaps get a similar result by depowering the fuser roller (or
removing it ?) but this would be much harder to do and much more liable to
smudge.


     Russell McMahon
_____________________________

>From other worlds - http://www.easttimor.com
                               http://www.sudan.com

What can one man* do?
Help the hungry at no cost to yourself!
at  http://www.thehungersite.com/

(* - or woman, child or internet enabled intelligent entity :-))


{Original Message removed}

2000\05\23@085720 by Russell McMahon

picon face
Here's a trick which MAY be useful. Like all the best ideas, I discovered it
by accident - in this case while trying to print an envelope short side in.

If you cut a sheet of paper to less than a certain length (the exact length
will vary with your printer) and feed it to a laser printer, then the feed
rollers after the toner deposition stage will (may?) fail to pick it up and
the paper will stop in the midst of the printer without having been fused.

I have an old HP4L that I normally use and if I feed it a half sheet it
receives the image and then sits
nicely in the printer until I remove the toner cartridge and take it out.
You now have an unfused smudge free copy waiting to be transferred to
something else.

I haven't tried this for PCB work but I have used it to transfer toner to
mugs and then baked them in a domestic oven to produce a surprisingly robust
finish.
I have also transferred pictures from a scanner to a plastic surface by this
method.
YMWV

This would be very easy for someone to try for PCB purposes - if you do
please  let us know the results!

You could perhaps get a similar result by depowering the fuser roller (or
removing it ?) but this would be much harder to do and much more liable to
smudge.


     Russell McMahon
_____________________________

>From other worlds - http://www.easttimor.com
                               http://www.sudan.com

What can one man* do?
Help the hungry at no cost to yourself!
at  http://www.thehungersite.com/

(* - or woman, child or internet enabled intelligent entity :-))


{Original Message removed}

2000\05\23@122027 by Damon Hopkins

flavicon
face
Russell McMahon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2000\05\23@123446 by Alan B Pearce

face picon face
>I wonder if it would smudge if you just put a switch on the power supply
>line to the fuser element.. then you could let the paper print manually
>but not fuse it to the paper.. you could print stuff on anything that
>would fit in the printer slot then... It'd probably smudge though..

>From my experience with servicing laser engines, I would say what will happen is
some of the toner will collect on the fuser roller because it is not being fused
into the paper, and then will produce repeat patterns along the paper over the
rest of the image, right where you do not want it. I would like to try Russell's
idea, though possibly taking it one step further. How about charging up the
surface of the laminate in a similar manner to the method used by a laser
printer to charge the image roller, and then shine the image direct onto the
laminate. Pass the laminate through something which will drop toner onto it a
bit like a continuous flow chocolate machine, and then direct fuse the toner to
the laminate. Yeah, I know it is cloud cuckoo land, as it will not be possible
to discharge parts of the laminate using the image because it is a copper sheet
instead of a silicon roller, but it would save some image stretching problems.

2000\05\23@162058 by Robert Rolf
picon face
This is EXACTLY how the very first XEROX copier worked. It used
a flat piece of metal, coated with selenium, and had a series of
'stations' that you moved the plate through to charge, expose, coat with
toner (flour shaker style), laminate, and fuse (bake). Saw this on a
Discovery Channel program. 1'x1'x3' high desk top office copier. Could
only do single sided pages since the expose cycle was done through the
back of the page. Took about 3 minutes to complete so it didn't get too
far in the marketplace. Then they perfected the continous feed 8511
copier and the
rest is history.

Alan B Pearce wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2000\05\24@095230 by Dale Botkin

flavicon
face
On Tue, 23 May 2000, Damon Hopkins wrote:

> Russell McMahon wrote:
> > You could perhaps get a similar result by depowering the fuser roller (or
> > removing it ?) but this would be much harder to do and much more liable to
> > smudge.
>
> I wonder if it would smudge if you just put a switch on the power supply
> line to the fuser element.. then you could let the paper print manually
> but not fuse it to the paper.. you could print stuff on anything that
> would fit in the printer slot then... It'd probably smudge though..

You'll also have to dummy up the fuser temperature sensor, probably along
with a few others. The laser printer will be very reluctant to print if it
sees anything unusual in the way of fuser temperature, fuser heater
continuity, etc.

Actually, a Xerox 4045 might not be bad for this.  It didn't use a fuser
roller, it used a fuser lamp that fused the toner with radiant heat, no
pressure.  Of course, everything ELSE about the 4045 is such a total,
absolute nightmare, plus they have extremely limited graphics capability.
Well, that and you'll need extra supports for your desk...

Dale
---
The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new
discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..."
               -- Isaac Asimov

2000\05\24@214045 by Brian Kraut

picon face
I think the problem you will have is that as soon as you try to iron it on it will
stick more to the paper than what you are trying to iron it on to.  It is also
very fragile.  A good breeze will blow the toner off and if you move it slightly
it will smudge.  The backing paper for lables works great and is cheep.

Damon Hopkins wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

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