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'[OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting in M'
2000\04\17@151627 by Andrew Warren

face
flavicon
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Wollenberg, Frank <spam_OUTPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> I'm looking for a windows editor, brief-compatible, and with RCS and
> MAKE support. But that's my personal wish. An editor should have
> various key-styles like EMACS, WINDOWS, VI, Wordstar... Features that
> are a must is:
>         - syntax-highlighting like UltraEdit
>         - regular expressions in search/replace like BRIEF
>         - auto-reload on external file change like ZEUS/UltraEdit -
>         file differencer like ZEUS - auto-indent - column blocks like
>         BRIEF - context-sensitive help - function list - project
>         support like UltraEdit
> The file differencer should display both files in a vertical split
> window, highlighting the differences. Also customizing by macros like
> in brief (*.CM) or emacs (*.EL) is nice.

   Codewright does ALL of that.  None of the people whom I've
   convinced to try it has switched back to any other editor.

   -Andy


=== Andrew Warren - .....fastfwdKILLspamspam@spam@ix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - San Diego, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

2000\04\17@201658 by Scott Newell

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face
>    Codewright does ALL of that.  None of the people whom I've
>    convinced to try it has switched back to any other editor.
>
>    -Andy

I demo'd it and went back to UltraEdit.  Didn't have time to climb the
learning curve at the time.  It's still on my wish list for the next time
boss-man has extra money to spend.

To me, the Codewright UI seemed a little sluggish.  The window scrolling
and menus seemed to drag slightly compared to other apps.


newell

2000\04\18@034949 by D Lloyd

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face
Hi,

I agree, Codewright clearly is the best Windows editor there is. Not entirely
intuitive on the menu front, but lots of features......including a code
beautifier (ideal for contractors)  ; )

Dan





Andrew Warren <fastfwdspamKILLspamIX.NETCOM.COM>
17/04/2000 20:15


Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU>

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cc:    (bcc: Dan Lloyd/GBPTD/ABB)
Subject:  [OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting in MPLAB")

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Wollenberg, Frank <PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

   Codewright does ALL of that.  None of the people whom I've
   convinced to try it has switched back to any other editor.

   -Andy


=== Andrew Warren - @spam@fastfwdKILLspamspamix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - San Diego, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

2000\04\18@095112 by Robert Wuest

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face
Andrew Warren wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I have to put my $0.02 in here.

Visual slickedit also rocks.  If it isn't as good as Codewright, I'd be
surprised (never having used codewright).  VS does all of the above, it
does it with a very intuitive interface and it runs identically on both
windows and Linux (although you have to buy both versions to get it.)

I have Cygwin installed for GNU make on windows and use the same
makefile to compile (with Hi-Tech C, both version installed) in both
environments.

In Linux, the interface to RCS is seamless.  I have never actually used
the windows RCS interface 'cause I don't have the executables.  It
doesn't support CVS, which I think is a weekness.

It does auto-reload, excellent syntax highlighting, has a great file
difference/interactive edit/merge tool, which would be even cooler if it
could work from an RCS version file :)

The Linux/windows thing was what convinced me to go with Visual Slick
Edit about 5 years ago and I have never been sorry I did.  I also have
recommended it to others, none of which I know of have changed and they
are all happy with it.

I do not work for microedge or anything, I just really like their
product.  I find it a very productive work environment and highly
recommend it.


--
Robert Wuest, PE

2000\04\18@111235 by Mark Skeels

picon face
I use SlickEdit for the WinXX platform for 8051 assembly coding. I love it.

Another very nice thing: when the demo period expired, I called them up and
they gave me a new code over the phone to plug in which enabled it for
another month.

The compare tool is very nice; it has saved me a lot of time, and the
interface to my 8051 assembler is easy.

There is a window in the IDE which I have configured to show the command
line results of the dos-based assembler, and it is very easy to go from the
editor to the ICE and back again. When doing a search through the text, this
lower window automatically changes to show all the matched lines, and
clicking on the line in this window brings the text editor window to that
location.

It has column blocking, automatic commenting (make asterisk boxes, comment
out selected lines) and my version understands the Delphi IDE and interfaces
with it (although I haven't used this feature.)

I never felt the impulse to move on once I started using it. My productivity
has increased by using this product.

Mark

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\18@131704 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   xxxxxxxx clearly is the best Windows editor there is.
                                ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

This is the problem, of course (or part of it, anyway.)  When I picked my
editor, I wanted something that ran on CPM, TOPS20, TOPS10, and unix.  At
the time, EMACS was the only thing that came close (MINCE for CPM, FINE for
tops10, elle or cmuemacs for unix, IIRC.)  Nowdays the situation is a bit
cleaner, since PCs have approached the capabilities (performance-wise) of
the mainframes of yore (so more editors are available cross-platform and
more consistant versions), and the number of contending operating systems
has gone down (a bad thing, IMHO, but still a fact of life.)  But the number
of editors that you can run on all of (MacOS, unix, Windows) is still pretty
small.  (of course, what with mice and more consistant function key
behavior, it's now pretty easy to do "simple" editing tasks all in GUI
windows, but that's not a "real" editor...)

BillW

2000\04\18@140701 by Quitt, Walter

flavicon
face
Am I dating myself if I dare say I used TOPS?
Can you say TECO?

I still shudder....

-Walt :-) :-)

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\18@141114 by M. Adam Davis

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face
Every real programer uses EDLIN under DOS 3.1.

-Adam

"Quitt, Walter" wrote:
>
> Am I dating myself if I dare say I used TOPS?
> Can you say TECO?
>
> I still shudder....
>
> -Walt :-) :-)

2000\04\18@141916 by andy howard

flavicon
face
> From: "M. Adam Davis" <spamBeGoneadavisspamBeGonespamUBASICS.COM>
> Every real programer uses EDLIN under DOS 3.1.
> -Adam


Nah, COPY CON PROGRAM.HEX

2000\04\18@142957 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   > Every real programer uses EDLIN under DOS 3.1.

   Nah, COPY CON PROGRAM.HEX

well, when *I* was boy, all we had was this singularity... and we didn't
even know how long that lasted, cause time hadn't been invented yet!

:-)
BillW

2000\04\18@165519 by jamesnewton

face picon face
Years ago, I saw a program (a .com) that could be entered by
COPY CON HEX2BIN.COM

Some guy had figured out how to write the program by mapping instruction
opcodes to ASCII keystrokes! So after you typed that in, you could, in fact

COPY CON BINARY.HEX
HEX2BIN < BINARY.HEX > BINARY.COM

Yeah! That's a real programmer! <Sniff><Adjust waistband>

Is this where I brag about writing Win32 app's in MASM?

---
James Newton (PICList Admin #3)
TakeThisOuTjamesnewtonEraseMEspamspam_OUTpiclist.com 1-619-652-0593
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[RemoveMEPICLISTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of andy howard
Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2000 11:18
To: PICLISTEraseMEspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting in MPLAB")


> From: "M. Adam Davis" <EraseMEadavisspamUBASICS.COM>
> Every real programer uses EDLIN under DOS 3.1.
> -Adam


Nah, COPY CON PROGRAM.HEX

2000\04\18@170335 by M. Adam Davis

flavicon
face
Actually, it's about time for someone to talk about entering programs using a
bank of switches and blinking lights...

"Terminal?  Heck, kid, we didn't even know what a teletype was!  Punch cards
were too expensive for us back then.  We switched the switches, and hope we
didn't enter into an infinite loop, thats whut we did!"

-Adam

James Newton wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2000\04\18@171412 by l.allen

picon face
> Actually, it's about time for someone to talk about entering programs using a
> bank of switches and blinking lights...
>
> "Terminal?  Heck, kid, we didn't even know what a teletype was!  Punch cards
> were too expensive for us back then.  We switched the switches, and hope we
> didn't enter into an infinite loop, thats whut we did!"
>
> -Adam
>
Luxury

We used to have to run paper tape in an actual physical
loop (with sellotape holding end to beginning) to boot a
PDP11.

And when we got home we had to lick road clean with
tongue.

Try and tell the young people toady that.. and they wont
believe you.


_____________________________

Lance Allen
Technical Officer
Uni of Auckland
Psych Dept
New Zealand

http://www.psych.auckland.ac.nz

_____________________________

2000\04\18@175639 by Plunkett, Dennis

flavicon
face
       I wonder what one Gauss used when he did his first signal processing
calculations? (Smile)

       Dennis



> {Original Message removed}

2000\04\18@183302 by Russell McMahon

picon face
>Actually, it's about time for someone to talk about entering programs using
a
>bank of switches and blinking lights...
>
>"Terminal?  Heck, kid, we didn't even know what a teletype was!  Punch
cards
>were too expensive for us back then.  We switched the switches, and hope we
>didn't enter into an infinite loop, thats whut we did!"
>
>-Adam


Are you joking? Maybe not.
This is how my 1st microcomputer worked (of course).
Didn't even need a program running to do it :-)
The processor provided the infinite loop :-) - all 65536 locations of it.
The NatSemi SC/MP processor had a mode where it would cycle up memory
addresses like a counter starting at $0000 and could single clock (it was
static) so you trapped it at 0000, keyed 8 data switches to whatever, hit
the RAM write button and then let it step on to $0001 etc.
After a while when you had (hopefully) loaded your program you hit reset and
away it went (sometimes).
Debugging was "easy" as you could step it one instruction at a time and look
at the data output to see what it was doing :-). Data output was (of course)
8 LEDs on the data bus plus LEDs on the address bus  :-).

Having (optional) address switches as well would give you the luxury of
examining RAM locations for contents - if you had RAM. Many systems had none
and just used the SC/MP internal registers.

Now let me tell you about the cardboard box (you had a box?!!), snow, no
shoes, no feet, uphill to scho0l both ways <<you went to SCHOOL !!!?>>,
slept at the bottom of a frozen lake, ... (what have I missed?).

Next step was the luxurious 6800 and D2 kit. I could probably just about
write 6800 machine code out of my head still but it's been rather a long
time (and I can't do that for ANY other processor I have ever used). On a D2
I could once-upon-a-time key in a full alphanumeric moving message program
in hex from cold start complete with 7-segment alphamuneric message. No
practical use to anyone but a superb way of showing off to the uninitiated
:-).


Somewhere along the way we built an optical paper tape reader [[hi Ken]]
using phototransistors - hiiigh speed input! - yee ha. Surprisingly
accurate. Read as fast as you could hand pull the tape through. Faster than
cassette tape. harder to write to :-(. Got an old Burroughs mainframe paper
tape punch from the dump (cheating!).
Those were the days. Glad they are gone (but good to have had them).

Nobody of course wants to hear that our first floppy disk drive was single
sided with a massive 160 kB capacity (and cost over $1000 equivalent in
todays money) and that ....


What's this got to do with editors??? :-)




Russell McMahon




>
>James Newton wrote:
>>
>> Years ago, I saw a program (a .com) that could be entered by
>> COPY CON HEX2BIN.COM
>>
>> Some guy had figured out how to write the program by mapping instruction
>> opcodes to ASCII keystrokes! So after you typed that in, you could, in
fact
{Quote hidden}

>> {Original Message removed}

2000\04\18@185415 by Craig Lee

flavicon
face
I agree, I liked Edlin!

-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[PICLISTSTOPspamspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of M. Adam Davis
Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2000 12:09 PM
To: spamBeGonePICLISTSTOPspamspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting in MPLAB")


Every real programer uses EDLIN under DOS 3.1.

-Adam

"Quitt, Walter" wrote:
>
> Am I dating myself if I dare say I used TOPS?
> Can you say TECO?
>
> I still shudder....
>
> -Walt :-) :-)

2000\04\18@193246 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
See also http://www.firebirdarts.com/audio/rwboy.ram

(My previous comment about singularities, which is supposed to END this
sort of discussion, comes from the inter-verse patter that sometimes
accompanies this song...)

BillW


When I Was A Boy

Copyright 1997 by Frank Hayes, Firebird Arts & Music (BMI)

When I was a boy our Nintendo
Was carved from an old Apple tree
And we used garden hose to connect it
To our steam-powered color tv.

But it still beat that ancient Atari
'Cuz I almost went blind, don'tcha know,
Playing Breakout and Pong on a video game
Hooked up to the radio.

And we walked twenty miles to the schoolhouse
Barefoot, uphill both ways,
Through blizzards in summer and winter
Back in the good old days.
Back when Fortran was not even Three-tran
And the PC was only a toy
And we did our computing by gaslight
When I was a boy.

When I was a boy all our networks
Were for hauling in fish from the sea--
Our bawd rate was eight bits an hour (and she was worth it!),
And our IP address was just 3.

And you kids who complain that the World Wide Web
Is too slow oughtta cut out your bitchin',
'Cuz when I was a boy every packet
Was delivered by carrier pigeon

And we walked twenty miles to the schoolhouse
Barefoot, uphill both ways,
Through blizzards in summer and winter
Back in the good old days.
Back when Fortran was not even Two-tran
And the mainframe was only a toy
And we did our computing by torchlight
When I was a boy.

When I was a boy our IS shop
Built relational tables from wood,
And we wrappered our data in oilcloth
To preserve it the best that we could.

And we carried our bits in a bucket,
And our mainframe weighed 900 tons,
And we programmed in ones and in zeros
And sometimes we ran out of ones.

And we walked twenty miles to the schoolhouse
Barefoot, uphill both ways,
Through blizzards in summer and winter
Back in the good old days.
Back when Fortran was not even One-tran
And the abacus? Only a toy!
And we did our computing in primordial darkness
When I was a boy.

2000\04\18@193256 by Arthur

flavicon
face
how about pip | pipe
and spending a week punching card pass it to the computer data inputter
waiting a week to be told error on card 13 row s*?/....
all this to let a=10+4....... print a..
then i got a job and we used cpm went on holiday came back to *ibm* systems
told by super os is the same get on with jobs that were wanted last week,
did pip command that was destination sorce ha. not now  replaced 6 months
work with empty files...
thank god for the backup's that took a few days to restore.
I had to unlearn cpm and learn dos ver 1.1. and 8" floppy disks 1/5meg hard
drive.
all the trouble since then gladly taking up the soldering iron and
electronic instead.
All the best Art
----- Original Message -----
From: Craig Lee <KILLspamcleespamBeGonespamATTCANADA.NET>
To: <EraseMEPICLISTspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2000 11:41 PM
Subject: Re: [OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting in MPLAB")


> I agree, I liked Edlin!
>
> {Original Message removed}

2000\04\18@202307 by Dale Botkin
flavicon
face
I was told *REAL* programmers just glower at the chip until the bits align
themselves properly.

Oh, wait -- that was field engineers.  Never mind...  8-)

Dale

On Tue, 18 Apr 2000, M. Adam Davis wrote:

{Quote hidden}

---
The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new
discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..."
               -- Isaac Asimov

2000\04\18@203337 by Dale Botkin

flavicon
face
On Tue, 18 Apr 2000, M. Adam Davis wrote:

> Actually, it's about time for someone to talk about entering programs using a
> bank of switches and blinking lights...

Been there, done that.  IBM 360/40 hand loops for diagnostics.  Also had
some short games (like C0FFEE).  The 2030 was a pain, all dials instead of
the baton switches.

Done it with a PDP-11/34, too...  I only wish I'd ever had the fun of an
Imsai or Altair.

> "Terminal?  Heck, kid, we didn't even know what a teletype was!  Punch cards
> were too expensive for us back then.  We switched the switches, and hope we
> didn't enter into an infinite loop, thats whut we did!"

Yep...  <snaps suspenders>...  Darn near sprained a wrist that way one
day...  <grin>

Dale

{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

2000\04\19@043158 by Alan B Pearce

face picon face
>We used to have to run paper tape in an actual physical
>loop (with sellotape holding end to beginning) to boot a
>PDP11.

I did not get quite that far, but do remember feeding paper tape through an
ASR33 teletype several times as the assembler did each pass of its assembly. We
were using a PDP11 that had only dual 8 inch floppy drives.

2000\04\19@070812 by Andrew Kunz

flavicon
face
Laugh not!  When I was working for the USN about 10 years ago, this was actually
how you bootstrapped the computers which run the AEGIS system.

Andy










Russell McMahon <spamBeGoneapptechspamKILLspamCLEAR.NET.NZ> on 04/18/2000 05:54:58 PM

Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list <.....PICLISTspam_OUTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>








To:      TakeThisOuTPICLIST.....spamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU

cc:      (bcc: Andrew Kunz/TDI_NOTES)



Subject: Re: [OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting
         in MPLAB")








>Actually, it's about time for someone to talk about entering programs using
a
>bank of switches and blinking lights...
>
>"Terminal?  Heck, kid, we didn't even know what a teletype was!  Punch
cards
>were too expensive for us back then.  We switched the switches, and hope we
>didn't enter into an infinite loop, thats whut we did!"
>
>-Adam


Are you joking? Maybe not.
This is how my 1st microcomputer worked (of course).
Didn't even need a program running to do it :-)
The processor provided the infinite loop :-) - all 65536 locations of it.
The NatSemi SC/MP processor had a mode where it would cycle up memory
addresses like a counter starting at $0000 and could single clock (it was
static) so you trapped it at 0000, keyed 8 data switches to whatever, hit
the RAM write button and then let it step on to $0001 etc.
After a while when you had (hopefully) loaded your program you hit reset and
away it went (sometimes).
Debugging was "easy" as you could step it one instruction at a time and look
at the data output to see what it was doing :-). Data output was (of course)
8 LEDs on the data bus plus LEDs on the address bus  :-).

Having (optional) address switches as well would give you the luxury of
examining RAM locations for contents - if you had RAM. Many systems had none
and just used the SC/MP internal registers.

Now let me tell you about the cardboard box (you had a box?!!), snow, no
shoes, no feet, uphill to scho0l both ways <<you went to SCHOOL !!!?>>,
slept at the bottom of a frozen lake, ... (what have I missed?).

Next step was the luxurious 6800 and D2 kit. I could probably just about
write 6800 machine code out of my head still but it's been rather a long
time (and I can't do that for ANY other processor I have ever used). On a D2
I could once-upon-a-time key in a full alphanumeric moving message program
in hex from cold start complete with 7-segment alphamuneric message. No
practical use to anyone but a superb way of showing off to the uninitiated
:-).


Somewhere along the way we built an optical paper tape reader [[hi Ken]]
using phototransistors - hiiigh speed input! - yee ha. Surprisingly
accurate. Read as fast as you could hand pull the tape through. Faster than
cassette tape. harder to write to :-(. Got an old Burroughs mainframe paper
tape punch from the dump (cheating!).
Those were the days. Glad they are gone (but good to have had them).

Nobody of course wants to hear that our first floppy disk drive was single
sided with a massive 160 kB capacity (and cost over $1000 equivalent in
todays money) and that ....


What's this got to do with editors??? :-)




Russell McMahon




>
>James Newton wrote:
>>
>> Years ago, I saw a program (a .com) that could be entered by
>> COPY CON HEX2BIN.COM
>>
>> Some guy had figured out how to write the program by mapping instruction
>> opcodes to ASCII keystrokes! So after you typed that in, you could, in
fact
{Quote hidden}

>> {Original Message removed}

2000\04\19@084515 by paulb

flavicon
face
M. Adam Davis wrote:

> Every real programer uses EDLIN under DOS 3.1.

 Once.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\04\19@113427 by Quitt, Walter

flavicon
face
And I bet it was (still is) on an AN/UYK-10 or -20 too.
BTW that's prounouced as a YUCK 20 or YUCK 10.
"Ya gotta love it."

You STILL load cryptos that way, too.
Then they expect you to burn or eat the tape.

-W

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\19@120529 by Andrew Kunz

flavicon
face
You got it!  "Yuck 20s."  Probably the nicest assembly language I've ever used.
It had a really nice OS, too.

At the time I was leaving they were getting ready for the next generation, which
would have advanced to only about 10 years behind state of the art.  Can't say
it wasn't rugged equipment, though!

Never heard anything nice about the Rolm processors.  Must have been designed by
some doctor who never did any coding.

Andy









"Quitt, Walter" <.....wquittspamRemoveMEMICROJOIN.COM> on 04/19/2000 11:31:20 AM

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cc:      (bcc: Andrew Kunz/TDI_NOTES)



Subject: Re: [OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting
         in MPLAB")








And I bet it was (still is) on an AN/UYK-10 or -20 too.
BTW that's prounouced as a YUCK 20 or YUCK 10.
"Ya gotta love it."

You STILL load cryptos that way, too.
Then they expect you to burn or eat the tape.

-W

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\19@121604 by Quitt, Walter

flavicon
face
Rugged for sure.  I still like the idea of the BATTLE RUN or MODE switch!
It has something to do with the way the unit responds to circuit breaker
interruptions or temp or something.  I AM getting old and forgetful.

Then for safety's sake there was the HALT_AND_CATCH_FIRE instruction on
some nameless mil computers, too.

There are still machines and things using vacuum tubes because they
can still work after the BIG (EMI) Bangs!

Glad I don't deal with that stuff anymore.  I understand if it is not
COTS these days, they won't buy it.  Unless of course.....

Can't mention that, though. :-) :-) :-)

-W

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\19@122437 by Alan B Pearce

face picon face
>Then for safety's sake there was the HALT_AND_CATCH_FIRE instruction on
>some nameless mil computers, too.

I used to work for an outfit that built its own EPROM programmer around an
ancient Varian computer which was known to intermittently crash for no known
reason. The programming pulse for the EPROM had its length determined by a
software loop. One day the inevitable happened and the machine crashed leaving
the EPROM in the "I am cooking" state. By the time the power was turned off the
chip was very definitely "Well done" as it was visibly glowing under its little
quartz window.

2000\04\19@123521 by Andrew Kunz

flavicon
face
Fortunately, there is not too much 400V COTS rad-hard equipment made <G>

Be sure to engage Full Auto so that she still launches the birds before you say
"Abandon Ship"  ;-)

Andy









"Quitt, Walter" <TakeThisOuTwquittspamspamMICROJOIN.COM> on 04/19/2000 12:13:18 PM

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Subject: Re: [OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting
         in MPLAB")








Rugged for sure.  I still like the idea of the BATTLE RUN or MODE switch!
It has something to do with the way the unit responds to circuit breaker
interruptions or temp or something.  I AM getting old and forgetful.

Then for safety's sake there was the HALT_AND_CATCH_FIRE instruction on
some nameless mil computers, too.

There are still machines and things using vacuum tubes because they
can still work after the BIG (EMI) Bangs!

Glad I don't deal with that stuff anymore.  I understand if it is not
COTS these days, they won't buy it.  Unless of course.....

Can't mention that, though. :-) :-) :-)

-W

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\19@123728 by Andrew Kunz

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Easier way to do that is just socket the EPROMs backwards.

Andy








Alan B Pearce <@spam@A.B.PearceRemoveMEspamEraseMERL.AC.UK> on 04/19/2000 12:22:06 PM

Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list <EraseMEPICLISTspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>








To:      @spam@PICLISTspam_OUTspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU

cc:      (bcc: Andrew Kunz/TDI_NOTES)



Subject: Re: [OT] "Best" Editor (was: "Syntax Highlighting
         in MPLAB")








>Then for safety's sake there was the HALT_AND_CATCH_FIRE instruction on
>some nameless mil computers, too.

I used to work for an outfit that built its own EPROM programmer around an
ancient Varian computer which was known to intermittently crash for no known
reason. The programming pulse for the EPROM had its length determined by a
software loop. One day the inevitable happened and the machine crashed leaving
the EPROM in the "I am cooking" state. By the time the power was turned off the
chip was very definitely "Well done" as it was visibly glowing under its little
quartz window.

2000\04\19@124318 by Quitt, Walter

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But that doesn't always break the smoke seal.
Leaving connected to 12 V usually will let
all the smoke out.  It is really too bad
that you can not put the smoke back in once
you let some out.

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\19@124910 by Sean Breheny

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Hey Andy,

In that case, you better hope that the ship has pretty good IFF! What
would it do to neutral/unknown targets?

Sean


On Wed, 19 Apr 2000, Andrew Kunz wrote:

> Fortunately, there is not too much 400V COTS rad-hard equipment made <G>
>
> Be sure to engage Full Auto so that she still launches the birds before you say
> "Abandon Ship"  ;-)
>
> Andy

2000\04\19@131027 by M. Adam Davis

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I remember reading it somewhere, but I can't find it now.  Look at the dc/ac
specs for the chip you're going to use.

-Adam

Sean Breheny wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2000\04\19@131824 by Sean Breheny

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Huh?!!!! ship <> chip! I think you probably realized what I meant but if
so, I'm afraid I don't get the joke.

Sean


On Wed, 19 Apr 2000, M. Adam Davis wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2000\04\19@142212 by Matt Bonner

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Andrew Kunz wrote:
>
> Easier way to do that is just socket the EPROMs backwards.

Socketing an EPROM backwards is also the fastest way to
erase it.  Unfortunately, they can't be reprogrammed after
this type of "erasure".

--Matt

2000\04\19@231019 by David Lions

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At 12:21 PM 4/19/00 -0600, you wrote:
>Andrew Kunz wrote:
>>
>> Easier way to do that is just socket the EPROMs backwards.
>
>Socketing an EPROM backwards is also the fastest way to
>erase it.  Unfortunately, they can't be reprogrammed after
>this type of "erasure".
>
>--Matt
>
>

yeah...arc welders do that too.

David Lions
Lab Technician
Miva Corporation

2000\04\21@124159 by Jeffrey D Spears

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Was that the AN-UYK/20 (Yuck-20)?? If so, it was a marvelous beast!
Kept the entire room toasty-warm. That magnetic core memory allows
the thing to pick right back where it left off upon power-up.

I worked on a Coast Guard icebreaker for a few years. Up in the radio
room was installed a yuck-20 running NAVMACS. NAVMACS is a sort of
router for teletype messages.

Gotta hand it to the Navy -- they sure buy equipment to last!

ok..jef

On Wed, 19 Apr 2000, Andrew Kunz wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> >> {Original Message removed}

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