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'[OT]:blink programs'
2003\10\24@102353 by llile

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I have always wondered if the correct term would be

"Blink an LED" or

"Blink a LED"

I actually pronounce the letters in L - E - D because when I talk about
LED, my mechanical engineering compatriots think I am talking about a
heavy material used for radiation shielding and also to make the children
in Southern Missouri lead mining towns drool in their cereal.   To my ear
"an eL-Ee-Dee' sounds more correct.




-- Lawrence Lile

P.S. Wouter, really useful page.  I revert to the blink a led idea on many
projects just to make sure my oscillator and basic setup is working OK.  9
times out of 10 I find out I have either swapped some pins, programmed a
PIC16F877 using 16F84 settings, set an RC oscillator where an XT should go
or some other stupid problem.   Any one-off project that has an extra pin
always has a blinky LED to tell me it is alive.






Wouter van Ooijen <spam_OUTwouterTakeThisOuTspamVOTI.NL>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
10/24/2003 02:13 AM
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       Subject:        Re: blink programs


> there was a link to a web page with a lot
> of blink code. i lost it.
> does anyone have it?

That might be my blink-a-led page. Google is your (and my!) friend:
http://www.google.nl/search?q=blink+a+led&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=nl&lr=

Wouter van Ooijen

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2003\10\24@102942 by D. Jay Newman

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> I have always wondered if the correct term would be
>
> "Blink an LED" or
>
> "Blink a LED"

I have that problem also with some acronyms. I would say "Blink a LED",
though if I were writing officially I might say "Blink some LEDs" or
"Blink one LED" just to get rid of this problem.  :)
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2003\10\24@110602 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> P.S. Wouter, really useful page.

No need to convince me, I still blink-a-led on every new processor or
compiler I use.

I pronounce it like 'led', not many mechanical engineers around here.

Wouter van Ooijen

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2003\10\24@111604 by Keith L. Kovala

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What an interesting discussion to come up on a tech listserv.  After 16
years of speaking English, as my first language, it wasn't until I was in
Japan as an exchange student that I learned the an/a rule.  It was so
baffling to me to see a written rule for the use of an/a from the aspect of
English as a foreign language.  It was some Japanese students that were
having trouble with this simple grammar structure that asked me which was
right, and when.  I sat there for several minutes running through as many
combinations of a/an that I could think of, and sure enough, the rule of 'a'
before a consonant sound and 'an' before a vowel was true.  I'm sure I
learned the rule somewhere as a young child, but English was so ingrained
that I didn't think of that rule explicitly when forming a sentence.

So, if that's the case, then 'Blink an LED" would be correct when
spelling/sounding out L - E - D
and 'Blink a LED' would be correct when saying 'lead' (Pb) or 'lead' (long e
sound)

I do the long e variation, too many mech-e's around!  GRiN

Keith L. Kovala
EraseMEklkspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTksu.edu
klkspamspam_OUTrenderedelement.com

> {Original Message removed}

2003\10\24@133254 by John Ferrell

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I am older than the topic and I have always considered them "eleedees". Lead
always seemed ambiguous slang.

Check out the entry for it at
http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary


John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
@spam@johnferrellKILLspamspamearthlink.net
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"


{Original Message removed}

2003\10\24@141534 by Mike Singer

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John Ferrell wrote:
> I am older than the topic and I have always considered
> them "eleedees". Lead always seemed ambiguous slang.

How about "lightdiode" or "lightodiode"?

From
www.isk.kth.se/kursinfo/mekatronik/Ckurs/piclab/adscript/adlab.ht
m

PIC16F874/7
...
         for( j=0;j < 250; j++);
       }
/* toggle lightdiode  on/off                          */
   out = ! out;
  }



Mike.

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2003\10\25@054051 by Jake Anderson

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I don't really know why but people "saying" lead or however you want to
write it
just plain bugs me. Its a Light Emitting Diode written LED, its all in
capitals
its an acronym, unless the acronym actually spells an existing word it just
aint
right to say it.

{Original Message removed}

2003\10\25@075446 by Russell McMahon

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> I don't really know why but people "saying" lead or however you want to
> write it
> just plain bugs me. Its a Light Emitting Diode written LED, its all in
> capitals
> its an acronym, unless the acronym actually spells an existing word it
just
> aint
> right to say it.

           Thread largely untrimmed for benefit of BCCers

It's not uncommon to "say" acronyms as a word. In fact, there are some
acronyms that are (essentially) never said EXCEPT as a word. No doubt many
are designed that way - a mix of useful words is tossed about until a
euphonically acceptable "word" is arrived at.

An example to make the point is "L.A.S.E.R."
Nobody would EVER call this a ell ay ess ee ar.
"Lazer" is the only game in town (or maybe somewhat different in other
;anguages than English-English :-)

But it is, of course, an acronym for  Light Amplification (by) Stimulated
Emission (of) Radiation.

So I suspect that Ell Ee Dee or LED are both acceptable.

Can we think of other acronyms that are never spelt out?
Maybe NASA, UNESCO, NATO, ANZAC (only meaningful down-under (if there, these
days))...

Note that U.N. & the one time U.S.S.R. are ALWAYS spelt out :-)

I once designed a MATILDA
(Microprocessor AMR Tape Incremental Loading data Analyser)
AMR is itself an acronym so maybe it should have been a MAMRTILDA :-)
This read a 7 track 1/2" reel to reel digital data deck using a 6802!
microprocessor by implementing a GPIB subset. I was very proud of it at the
time.

       Russell McMahon

_____________________________________


> What an interesting discussion to come up on a tech listserv.  After 16
> years of speaking English, as my first language, it wasn't until I was in
> Japan as an exchange student that I learned the an/a rule.  It was so
> baffling to me to see a written rule for the use of an/a from the aspect
of
> English as a foreign language.  It was some Japanese students that were
> having trouble with this simple grammar structure that asked me which was
> right, and when.  I sat there for several minutes running through as many
> combinations of a/an that I could think of, and sure enough, the rule of
'a'
{Quote hidden}

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2003\10\25@083920 by Jim Tellier

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Russell McMahon wrote:
----- Original Message -----
> It's not uncommon to "say" acronyms as a word. In fact, there are some
> acronyms that are (essentially) never said EXCEPT as a word. No doubt many
> are designed that way - a mix of useful words is tossed about until a
> euphonically acceptable "word" is arrived at.

HA! Right you are!  Ever heard anyone "spell out" S.C.S.I.?  Nah... it's
always "Scuzzy"!  Always!
It doesn't matter if it "mimics" a *real* (English or other) word: point of
acronyms is to create an abbreviation that ends up being "pronounceable", so
as to be a time-saving factor in conversation and/or writing.  Perhaps the
most prolific acronym creators are the chemists (although many chemical
acronyms are un-pronounceable).  Everyone says "D.D.T.", not "duh dit" :^)
Still, you have to agree, it's easier than remembering
Dichloro-diphenyl-Trichloroethane :^)
Jim

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2003\10\25@084954 by Jake Anderson

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i think its something to do with length too
notice 3 letter acronyms are generally spelt
4 or more letters is said as a word?
ATF (i know you know that one Russell)
FBI
CIA
DOA
DOE
DDR
FSB
TLA
CDR
etc ;->

{Original Message removed}

2003\10\25@094218 by Russell McMahon

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> i think its something to do with length too
> notice 3 letter acronyms are generally spelt
> 4 or more letters is said as a word?

Just for fun, lets try some exceptions to those rules:-)

   LED (arguable)(and argued :-) )
   PIC


   MTBF    HDLC    ADSL     MTTR    ACDC (old!)

Hybrid:    UART    AART


> ATF (i know you know that one Russell)

Automatic Transmission Fluid?


       RM

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2003\10\26@083250 by Howard Winter

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Russell,

On Sun, 26 Oct 2003 00:55:14 +1300, Russell McMahon wrote:

> It's not uncommon to "say" acronyms as a word. In fact, there are some
> acronyms that are (essentially) never said EXCEPT as a word. No doubt many
> are designed that way - a mix of useful words is tossed about until a
> euphonically acceptable "word" is arrived at.

As I understand it, an acronym is a *word* formed from initials, like BASIC, COBOL, LASER, RADAR, NASA, NATO,
ANZAC, UNCLE and these are different from just using the initials on their own, like IBM, SAS, VCR, ICBM, BSE,
HST and that these are abbreviations, not acronyms.

> An example to make the point is "L.A.S.E.R."
> Nobody would EVER call this a ell ay ess ee ar.
> "Lazer" is the only game in town (or maybe somewhat different in other
> ;anguages than English-English :-)

As long as you don't *spell* it with a "Z" because that's wrong - you can't change the spelling of an acronym!

> But it is, of course, an acronym for  Light Amplification (by) Stimulated Emission (of) Radiation.

Quite!

I always think it's cheating a bit to miss words out, the worst example being POWER (an IBM spooling and
job-control system from the System/370 days).  Anyone remember what the whole thing was?

> So I suspect that Ell Ee Dee or LED are both acceptable.

I beg to differ - I think it sounds awful to pronounce it as a word.  Although you can, it grates with me the
same as does pronouncing "IBM" as a word.

> Can we think of other acronyms that are never spelt out?
> Maybe NASA, UNESCO, NATO, ANZAC (only meaningful down-under (if there, these
> days))...

The ones listed above, plus BENELUX, EFTA, SCSI, and a lot of computer languages (Algol, FORTRAN, SNOBOL...).
Anyone know why most acronymic computer languages are spelled with capitals, but Algol isn't?

> Note that U.N. & the one time U.S.S.R. are ALWAYS spelt out :-)

Similarly UK and USA.  Some of these, of course, would be difficult to pronounce anyway (or ugly, UK for
example!).

Incidentally, what is the correct way to pronounce "GNU"?

> I once designed a MATILDA
> (Microprocessor AMR Tape Incremental Loading data Analyser)
> AMR is itself an acronym so maybe it should have been a MAMRTILDA :-)
> This read a 7 track 1/2" reel to reel digital data deck using a 6802!
> microprocessor by implementing a GPIB subset. I was very proud of it at the
> time.

It didn't waltz, then?  :-)

Cheers,

Howard Winter

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2003\10\27@065830 by Alan B. Pearce
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>Incidentally, what is the correct way to pronounce "GNU"?

Like the Flanders and Swan song? Ginn-ooo

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