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'[OT]: website for sizing pipe for airlines?'
2003\05\30@103901 by Micro Eng

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Anyone ever come across a website that will help calculate the size of pipe
required for airlines in order to have a given pressure on the other end?

For example, I have a 400' run of pipe, tied to a compressor tank,
pressurized to 100psi, and I want to be able to have the 100psi at the end
of the pipe run, so what size pipe do I need in order to obtain this?.  The
values are just for example, but gives the general idea of what I am after.

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2003\05\30@104301 by Mike Harrison

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On Fri, 30 May 2003 08:38:20 -0600, you wrote:

>Anyone ever come across a website that will help calculate the size of pipe
>required for airlines in order to have a given pressure on the other end?
>
>For example, I have a 400' run of pipe, tied to a compressor tank,
>pressurized to 100psi, and I want to be able to have the 100psi at the end
>of the pipe run, so what size pipe do I need in order to obtain this?.  The
>values are just for example, but gives the general idea of what I am after.
You need to know the maximul flow rate. Any size of pipe will give you the same pressure at both
ends if there is no flow!

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2003\05\30@124525 by Tal

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> You need to know the maximul flow rate. Any size of pipe will
> give you the same pressure at both ends if there is no flow!

Assuming that the two ends of the pipes are at the same level ;-)

Tal

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2003\05\30@142253 by Micro Eng

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Right....all that is pretty clear....guess what I was thinking is that when
you run pipe for gas flow, if you have too small of a pipe (akin to using
too small of wire) that it makes it difficult if not impossible to have enuf
flow in that pipe to feed the end device.  Yes of course it depends on
device that is using the air.  In this case, its a burst of air via
solenoids.  I suppose, if you knew the static pressure and the duration of
the air burst, then you could figure out what the size needs to be.

Taking it from another approach.....and this is what I told the
user......rather than rely on a single tank at the end of the 200' of pipe,
have two tanks.  One tank attached to the compressor would bascially keep
the line charged, but also add a second tank (hmmm...a capacitor in the
sense of electricty) that would actually be used for the air burst.  So as
long as you can keep the second tank 'charged' the air bursts would work ok.

Thus, if I can relate the volume of air per burst, and knowing what the
volume of the tank is (pressure will be a constant) then I can perhaps
figure out how much airflow will be required to quickly charge  the second
tank back up, and then using a given pressure, what size pipe will be
required to accomplish this.

Oh...and a PIC will probably be controlling the solenoids  :-)

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2003\05\31@043108 by Peter L. Peres

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> Anyone ever come across a website that will help calculate the size of
> pipe required for airlines in order to have a given pressure on the
> other end?
>
> For example, I have a 400' run of pipe, tied to a compressor tank,
> pressurized to 100psi, and I want to be able to have the 100psi at the
> end of the pipe run, so what size pipe do I need in order to obtain
> this?.  The values are just for example, but gives the general idea of
> what I am after.

You are missing data necessary to solve the problem: you need to give the
flow (mass flow or volume). The figures for air hose vary because they
depend on how the hose is laid (bends etc). The best thing you can do is
set up 100' of hose with your device to be used and a pressure gauge near
the tool. Then measure pressure with the tool on and off. Allow a few
seconds for the reading to stabilise. This will give you loss at the flow
you're after. The loss will be a pressure differential (between compressor
output pressure and hose end pressure). Then you know how much you need to
increase the compressor pressure beforehead so you have enough when the
tool is running for each 100 feet of hose. Check that the hose can take
the punishment and that the tool accepts the high starting pressure.
Sometimes you can use a second regulator at the end of the hose to prevent
the burst at the start of the tool.

Peter

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