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'[OT]: hobbyist SMT prototyping?'
2001\07\26@125348 by Jeff DeMaagd

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Is there a resource for protyping surface mount assemblies?

If I had a board, paste & components is there a way to hack a toaster oven
to perform the heating task?

I have a project that I want to fit on to 9 cm^2 boards or smaller and I'd
like to experiment with SM components for density, but if the ovens
discussed a week ago are too expensive I'd like to rig an alternative.

Jeff

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2001\07\26@153420 by Eisermann, Phil [Ridg/CO]

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       It is quite possible to solder SMT stuff with a soldering iron.
Although you probably want a finer tip. If you stick to SO packages and 0805
resistors and capacitors, you'll be ok doing it by hand. It's unsoldering
components that becomes a challenge :) For that, you'd want a SMT rework
station. Lacking one of those, a small pair of cutters to snip component
leads works. Destroys the component, of course. But saves the board. 0805
packages can be removed with solder wick: remove as much solder as you can
(big chisel tip), then heat the component. Since they are so small, the
entire package heats up and will come off the pad. I used to do exactly that
before I got a PACE rework station.


> {Original Message removed}

2001\07\26@161648 by David VanHorn

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At 02:31 PM 7/26/01 -0500, Eisermann, Phil [Ridg/CO] wrote:
>         It is quite possible to solder SMT stuff with a soldering iron.
>Although you probably want a finer tip. If you stick to SO packages and 0805
>resistors and capacitors, you'll be ok doing it by hand. It's unsoldering
>components that becomes a challenge :) For that, you'd want a SMT rework
>station. Lacking one of those, a small pair of cutters to snip component
>leads works. Destroys the component, of course. But saves the board. 0805
>packages can be removed with solder wick: remove as much solder as you can
>(big chisel tip), then heat the component. Since they are so small, the
>entire package heats up and will come off the pad. I used to do exactly that
>before I got a PACE rework station.

For larger ICs, flood and lift will work, if done carefully.
I've done 100 pin ICs that way, though it would have been easier to cut the
leads (with a knife, cutters will rip up the pads)

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2001\07\26@200537 by Ashley Roll

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Hi Jeff,

Alexandre Guimarces and I are currently working on just this :)

We are designing a temperature controller and will publish it for all to
use. We'll let the PICList know when it is ready :)

Cheers,
Ash.

> {Original Message removed}

2001\07\26@202010 by Herbert Graf

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{Quote hidden}

       A real easy way to get SMT stuff off a board is a heat gun. The only
problem is when you use it you have to make sure you don't bump the board
causes things you DON'T want removed to shift. I've gotten almost anything I
wanted (both through hole and SMT) with my heat gun. TTYL

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2001\07\26@202640 by David P. Harris

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Waiting in anticipation ;-)
David

Ashley Roll wrote:

> Hi Jeff,
>
> Alexandre Guimarces and I are currently working on just this :)
>
> We are designing a temperature controller and will publish it for all to
> use. We'll let the PICList know when it is ready :)
>
> Cheers,
> Ash.
>
> > {Original Message removed}

2001\07\26@210753 by Joe Valdez

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The cheap way to unsolder SMT components (0402 and larger) is to buy several chisel tips at the local swap meet.  Then, using a swiss file, cut a slot in the tip corresponding to the size of the component to be remove.  The component is simply removed by holding the body with a pair of tweezers and apply heat to the two ends of the SMT component simultaneously.

Joe V.

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2001\07\26@222423 by Jeff DeMaagd

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I'm not exactly sure how the discussion got to unsoldering, as I was hoping
to do soldering, I don't think unsoldering ist that much of a problem for
the time being.

I am waiting with interet in the result of Ashley's & Alexandre's project.
Any way to hack/modify an off-the-shelf mini-oven to perform the task would
be of use to me, particularly for experimentation.  If there was call for it
I don't have a problem with getting pro-grade equipment and leaving at that.

Jeff

{Original Message removed}

2001\07\27@063117 by Bala Chandar

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Joe Valdez wrote:

> The cheap way to unsolder SMT components (0402 and larger) is
> to buy several chisel tips at the local swap meet.  Then,
> using a swiss file, cut a slot in the tip corresponding to
> the size of the component to be remove.  The component is
> simply removed by holding the body with a pair of tweezers
> and apply heat to the two ends of the SMT component simultaneously.

Hi Joe,

Thanks for your excellent idea! It's economical, efficient and there is
no risk of damaging the part by overheating which can happen if you heat
the entire part with a big chisel tip and lift the part along with the
molten solder.

Is the ascii art below correct?

What method do you use/recommend for removing SMT ICs?

Regards,
Bala
                      SMT part
                ___   ________   ___
               |   | |        | |   |
               |   | |________| |   |
               |   |____________|   |
               \                   /
                \    Chisel tip   /
                 \               /
                  \             /
                   \           /
                    |         |
                    |         |

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2001\07\27@063134 by Roman Black

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Jeff DeMaagd wrote:
>
> I'm not exactly sure how the discussion got to unsoldering, as I was hoping
> to do soldering, I don't think unsoldering ist that much of a problem for
> the time being.
>
> I am waiting with interet in the result of Ashley's & Alexandre's project.
> Any way to hack/modify an off-the-shelf mini-oven to perform the task would
> be of use to me, particularly for experimentation.  If there was call for it
> I don't have a problem with getting pro-grade equipment and leaving at that.


Jeff, we just started doing small production
with a cheap toaster oven. :o)
Did you see all the posts a couple of weeks back?
All the info is there.
If your boards are small, any decent toaster oven
with straight (not curved) elements will work great.
I've soldered for 25 years and i'm amazed just
how easy and repeatable this oven technique is.
-Roman

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2001\07\27@113017 by Douglas Butler

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You can get more even heating by placing ceramic tiles above and below
the PCB.  This may also help reduce thermal shock from turning on the
coils.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\07\28@013136 by 859-1?Q?Alexandre_Guimar=E3es?=

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Hi,


> You can get more even heating by placing ceramic tiles above and below
> the PCB.  This may also help reduce thermal shock from turning on the
> coils.


   I would advice to use very thin ceramic material or the big thermal mass
would cause temperature to change very slowly and you would not get the
right "curve". Besides I prefer to have infrared radiation directly to the
board and the ceramic material might kill it.

Best regards,
Alexandre Guimaraes
alexgspamKILLspamiis.com.br

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2001\07\29@142609 by Peter L. Peres

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> Besides I prefer to have infrared radiation directly to the
> board and the ceramic material might kill it.

And I prefer indirect heating using forced air (slow at 0.5-1.5 m/sec)
which avoids parts of the board being cooked while the shiny solder stays
relatively cold.

Peter

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2001\07\29@171746 by 859-1?Q?Alexandre_Guimar=E3es?=

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Hi,

> > Besides I prefer to have infrared radiation directly to the
> > board and the ceramic material might kill it.
>
> And I prefer indirect heating using forced air (slow at 0.5-1.5 m/sec)
> which avoids parts of the board being cooked while the shiny solder stays
> relatively cold.

   That is the best way at most of the times but much harder to make
because that air has to be slow and "laminar" or the turbulence will cause
cold spots. I have tried to make something like that in a small oven and
gave up in a few days. Easy on a big oven but really hard on small ones,
specially if you want to solder both sides of the board at once. Infrared is
the next best thing and much more easyly done.

Best regards,
Alexandre Guimaraes
EraseMEalexgspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTiis.com.br

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2001\07\30@071134 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza

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>It is quite possible to solder SMT stuff with a soldering iron.
>Although you probably want a finer tip. If you stick to SO packages and 0805
>resistors and capacitors, you'll be ok doing it by hand. It's unsoldering
>components that becomes a challenge :) For that, you'd want a SMT rework
>station. Lacking one of those, a small pair of cutters to snip component
>leads works. Destroys the component, of course. But saves the board. 0805
>packages can be removed with solder wick: remove as much solder as you can
>(big chisel tip), then heat the component. Since they are so small, the
>entire package heats up and will come off the pad. I used to do exactly that
>before I got a PACE rework station.

       In Brazil we use a heat blower, that used to put adeshive in cars, etc, with a reducer in the tip to concentrate the flux of heat. It's a common tool here. And we use not only for dessoldering, but also for soldering!


---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

Alexandre Souza
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http://planeta.terra.com.br/lazer/pinball/

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2001\07\30@180723 by Peter L. Peres

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Try one of those hot air oven (cooking) internal fans. It's really simple,
a stamped sheet propeller on a long axle with the motor outside the oven.
They can be axial or tangential (not radial usually).

Peter

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