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'[OT]: burn in time'
2001\11\27@133608 by David Dunn

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anybody here have info on how long a gadget needs to "burn in" / test to decide it's indeed a good part

i have a device, 16F877, a comparator, 7805, 20x4 char LCD, and some misc descrete parts, just need to know how long to test them before i ship
them to customers.


thanks for you ideas,


DLD

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2001\11\28@081453 by David Dunn

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anybody here have info on how long a gadget needs to "burn in" / test to decide it's indeed a good part

i have a device, 16F877, a comparator, 7805, 20x4 char LCD, and some misc descrete parts, just need to know how long to test them before i ship
them to customers.


thanks for you ideas,


DLD

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2001\11\28@153757 by Douglas Butler

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I was hoping someone else had a GOOD answer.  But as no one else has
replied...

In my experience time has little to do with it.  Temperature and
vibration are what kill my products.  I would put it on a paint shaker
and test every feature at both temperature extreems, maybe electrical
extreems, then call it done.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\11\28@170558 by Francisco Ares

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I worked for a company that makes industrial equipments some years ago, they had a special oven that cycles loose components from 0 to 120 degrees centigrade several times (don't remember how many), and only then a functional test was made do check which ones has not "survived".

The good ones go to the assembly line.  After mounted in an equipment and after ensuring this new piece of hardware works as it should, another oven at 50 degrees keeps the equipment working connected to an external simulator/analiser that stimulates some of its inputs and checks its responses.

After 24 of 48 hours - depending on the type of the equipment - another full test was done and only then the equipment could be sent to the customer.

Hope it helps
Francisco


David Dunn wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\11\29@030748 by Lawrence Lile

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Once upon a time I used to wear a sweater at my bench.  This was fine until
winter, when the humidity went to zero.  I'd program a PIC, it would work
properly about 2 or 3 times, then fail.  kaZAAP!

You'll catch such EOS related failures if you operate your product for a few
minutes, IMHO.  Other than that, I'd agree with the paint
shaker/oven/freezer concept, plus a variac or DC powert supply to turn the
juice up and down between the specified limits.  The military doesn't do
much more than this AFAIK, although they burn-in for days on end.

If your products are like mine, solder problems are the biggest bugaboo, and
they will show up with vibration or temperature extremes.

--Lawrence


----- Original Message -----
From: "Douglas Butler" <.....dbutlerKILLspamspam@spam@IMETRIX.COM>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Wednesday, November 28, 2001 8:32 AM
Subject: Re: [OT]: burn in time


> I was hoping someone else had a GOOD answer.  But as no one else has
> replied...
>
> In my experience time has little to do with it.  Temperature and
> vibration are what kill my products.  I would put it on a paint shaker
> and test every feature at both temperature extreems, maybe electrical
> extreems, then call it done.
>
> Sherpa Doug
>
> > {Original Message removed}

2001\11\29@084350 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Most devices follow some kind of "bathtub" curve: high number of failures
at the beginning, then a period with relatively low numbers, and then the
failures increases again. If you want to get most of the early failures,
you do a burn in that catches that first high part of the bathtub. But I
don't know where to find the data for this curve (failure rate over time)
for PICs. There has been a thread here recently with some links about
general failure data.

At 13:34 11/28/2001 -0200, Francisco Ares wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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