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'[OT]: What is the voltage in your country?'
2001\11\22@132912 by Walter Banks

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> (posted from Australia - 220V country)
> (posted from Canada - 110V country)
Actually a 117v  60 cycles country :) Ontario used to be 25 cycles

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2001\11\22@231612 by Timothy Stranex

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Walter Banks wrote:
>
> > (posted from Australia - 220V country)
> > (posted from Canada - 110V country)
> Actually a 117v  60 cycles country :) Ontario used to be 25 cycles
South Africa - 240V 50Hz

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2001\11\22@232820 by Gennette, Bruce

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Check out EPE magazine from about a year ago - they discussed Britain's
power system and explained that all the 220 to 250V countries had agreed to
standardise on 230V +-5% (which is 218.5 to 241.5V).  Most already are
within the band, and all will 'creap' towards it over time so that equipment
built in one country will actually be in spec in another.

I'm pretty sure that the 110/120V countries have reached a similar accord at
110V

Find whatever country's voltage you want at -
http://www.embassyworld.com/directories/International_Voltages.html

Bye.

{Original Message removed}

2001\11\22@233237 by Kevin J. Maciunas

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On Fri, 2001-11-23 at 14:49, Timothy Stranex wrote:
> Walter Banks wrote:
> >
> > > (posted from Australia - 220V country)
> > > (posted from Canada - 110V country)
> > Actually a 117v  60 cycles country :) Ontario used to be 25 cycles
> South Africa - 240V 50Hz
>

Australia is actually 240V/50Hz, we just USE the 220V setting on many
imported widgets :-)

Of course, the 240V is entirely nominal - at my local firestation, we
get 250VRMS - which is due to the supply folk tweaking it up for
residents at the far end of the road who grew tired of the "orange"
incandescant lights :-)

/Kevin
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2001\11\22@234733 by Randy Glenn

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When was Ontario 25 cycles? I thought that North America was 110-120V, 60Hz
ever since Westinghouse / Tesla won out over Edison for Niagara Falls.

(Incidentally, I'm measuring 135V out of the wall, but I've got a big-a**
transformer in the front yard)

-Randy Glenn

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{Original Message removed}

2001\11\23@040530 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Australia is actually 240V/50Hz, we just USE the 220V setting on many
>imported widgets :-)
>
>Of course, the 240V is entirely nominal - at my local firestation, we
>get 250VRMS - which is due to the supply folk tweaking it up for
>residents at the far end of the road who grew tired of the "orange"
>incandescant lights :-)

Australia used to be 230V in some states, 240V in other states, and at least
one was 250V. I know this because when I did my apprenticeship in New
Zealand (which is 230V) we exported stereo amplifiers to Australia and
provided a 230/240/250V selector for this reason. This was in the late
1960's, early 1970's.

I am not aware that it was done to deal with voltage drops as mentioned in
the quote, I understood these were the official supply voltages.

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2001\11\23@052612 by mark

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On 23 Nov 2001, at 15:26, Gennette, Bruce wrote:

>
> Find whatever country's voltage you want at -
> http://www.embassyworld.com/directories/International_Voltages.html
>

They stated 110V or 220V in Brasil. In fact, 110V is more like 127V due
to the triphase distribution circuit used here.



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2001\11\24@025202 by Kevin Maciunas

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On Fri, 2001-11-23 at 19:33, Alan B. Pearce wrote:

>
> Australia used to be 230V in some states, 240V in other states, and at least
> one was 250V. I know this because when I did my apprenticeship in New
> Zealand (which is 230V) we exported stereo amplifiers to Australia and
> provided a 230/240/250V selector for this reason. This was in the late
> 1960's, early 1970's.
>

..and it was even more bizarre before that.  My 1936 vintage house was
ORIGINALLY (it *has* been rewired, several times since!) wired for
"delta phase" power.  This was 3 phase supply with one "droopy" leg.  If
memory serves, it was something like 70V on the droopy leg and 200ish on
the others.  Whacky.

As far as I know, all of OZ is rated 240V/50Hz now.

> I am not aware that it was done to deal with voltage drops as mentioned in
> the quote, I understood these were the official supply voltages.
>

The tweaking to 250V+ I was referring to was a local supply hack - the
road now has more houses on it than it originally had and is fed from
only one transformer.  They upped the voltage at the head end to achieve
marginal acceptability at all points along the road :-)

/Kevin
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2001\11\24@031835 by Kathy Quinlan

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Western Australia (untill the early '90's IIRC) had 250Vac 50Hz, now we are
in line with the rest of Au at 240Vac, and rumour has it (and has been for
around 5 years now) that the whole of Au will drop to 230 Vac to be in line
with Europe. Although if you measure the average house in Au most houses
have around 235Vac.

Regards,

Kat.

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2001\11\24@045604 by Peter L. Peres

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> Actually a 117v  60 cycles country :) Ontario used to be 25 cycles

I didn't know Ontarians like FLICKERING CANDLE LIGHT that much. ;-) When
was it 25 cycles ?! 25 Cycles is used for some PBS telephone ringers and
long distance electricity trasmissions (also electrical railway power)
afaik ?

Peter

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2001\11\24@050231 by Peter L. Peres

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> Australia used to be 230V in some states, 240V in other states, and at
> least one was 250V. I know this because when I did my apprenticeship
> in New Zealand (which is 230V) we exported stereo amplifiers to
> Australia and provided a 230/240/250V selector for this reason. This
> was in the late 1960's, early 1970's.

Oz must be a killer place to deal in lightbulbs! Do the local electrical
supply traders drive Rollses? ;-)

(250V instead of 220 on a bulb designed for 220 will make it very bright
but it will only run for a few months at best)

Did they have a special fixture or device to fix the light voltage somhow?

Peter

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2001\11\24@071328 by Kathy Quinlan

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> Oz must be a killer place to deal in lightbulbs! Do the local electrical
> supply traders drive Rollses? ;-)
>
> (250V instead of 220 on a bulb designed for 220 will make it very bright
> but it will only run for a few months at best)
>
> Did they have a special fixture or device to fix the light voltage somhow?

Nothing special and bulbs lasted as long as the rest of the world, just the
were designed for 260Vac :o)

I still have a few 260Vac ones floating around (the ones that do not pop
every day ;o)

Regards,

Kat.
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2001\11\24@125314 by David VanHorn

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>
>I still have a few 260Vac ones floating around (the ones that do not pop
>every day ;o)

Just in case you think it's all straightened out here...
We're nominally 120 VAC, however, I have seen this range from 70VAC to 140VAC.
On non-defective systems.


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2001\11\27@171918 by Douglas Butler

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Hoover dam in Arizona was originally built for 50 Hz.  During the mid
30's it and California switched to 60 Hz.  There was a depression era
work program training people to alter clocks for the new frequency.
Unfortunately the training was so specific they had nothing to do after
the switch was complete.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\11\28@220142 by Martin G. McCormick

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       I love topics like this from time to time.  Here is some
information I have heard but am not sure if it is true.

       Oklahoma City had some DC service down town as late as
the seventies, but Oklahoma Gas and Electric was not signing up
any new customers and was trying to get rid of the remaining ones
who were using it to run big motors.  Again, I have no idea how
accurate this was.

       I also am wondering if Mexico was ever 50 HZ in the
sixties?  I thought I remember hearing Mexican radio broadcasts
in High School (1968) in which there was a 50 HZ hum slightly
audible in the background.

       A couple more disconnected tidbits:

       I used to work with a guy from Jim aka and he told me that
several years ago, Jim aka went from one power standard to the one
they now use which is 110-volt 50 HZ power, and the government
did some kind of house-to-house survey as to how much equipment
would be trashed or need to be modified after the change.

Finally.
       About 7 years ago, on the Oklahoma State University
campus where I work, a pigeon got in to a substation and
instantly changed from carbon-based life form to just plain
carbon.  Since our computer center was blacked out, the campus
power plant fired up a standby generator and we had power again
except for one small problem.  The engine throttle was not set
quite right and we had a line frequency of from 55 HZ to
sixty-something as they kept adjusting it.  The lights strobed
noticeably at near 50 HZ and our uninterruptible power supplies
on our network gear went to battery mode until they ran out and
suddenly shut everything down.  Those Faro-resonant transformers
didn't like all that frequency variation at all.  It was
also rather surreal hearing the normal hum of the air handlers and
other building equipment racing and slowing as the power plant
got the throttle speed set right.  Its not often that we
experience frequency variations in the power.  Our power is
generally steady and reliable in this part of the world.

Martin McCormick WB5AGZ  Stillwater, OK
OSU Center for Computing and Information Services Network Operations Group

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2001\11\29@155540 by Benjamin Bromilow

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Anyone here been to Cuba? Very interesting place. In the hotels some of the
plugs are 240v, whilst some are 110v. The connectors are the same. The only
difference is a sticker (which usually falls off) on the sockets! I suppose
it makes sense when you have people from different countries bringing
electronic stuff, but it seems to be farely randomly done, it's not like
every 220v socket has a 110v next to it.......

Ben

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2001\11\30@132203 by Harold M Hallikainen

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       Another reason to use universal input switching power supplies!

Harold

On Thu, 29 Nov 2001 20:01:30 -0000 Benjamin Bromilow
<RemoveMEbtbromilowTakeThisOuTspamLINEONE.NET> writes:
{Quote hidden}

FCC Rules Online at http://hallikainen.com/FccRules
Lighting control for theatre and television at http://www.dovesystems.com

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