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'[OT]: What's "mica" ?'
2001\05\15@022711 by Jinx

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I'm looking at various protective finishes for boxes and need
to know if the "mica" I've seen on some US sites is the same
as what I know as Formica or melamine

ta

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2001\05\15@024835 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jinx [SMTP:.....joecolquittKILLspamspam@spam@CLEAR.NET.NZ]
> Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 7:23 AM
> To:   PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject:      [OT]: What's "mica" ?
>
> I'm looking at various protective finishes for boxes and need
> to know if the "mica" I've seen on some US sites is the same
> as what I know as Formica or melamine
>
> ta
>
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Don't know if this is it, but in my last place, we used a mica based black
paint to protect the railway signalling equipment we manufactured.  It was a
very think, matt paint that had a slightly "sparkly" appearance.  Was
supposed to be very long lasting for equipment located outside, but I found
it very easy to get marks on it.

Mike

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2001\05\15@025709 by David Harmon

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On Tue, 15 May 2001 18:22:42 +1200, you wrote:

>I'm looking at various protective finishes for boxes and need
>to know if the "mica" I've seen on some US sites is the same
>as what I know as Formica or melamine

I don't know what somebody may be selling on some web site, but no, in
general in the US, mica is the crystalline mineral, hydrated aluminum
disilicates with whatever else is in it.  It comes in several forms, but
the most interesting is transparent and separates or cleaves into large
thin sheets.  AKA isinglass.
Formica and melamine are some kind of hard thermosetting plastic.

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2001\05\15@042146 by Jinx

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> mica is the crystalline mineral, hydrated aluminum disilicates

I'm familiar with mica the mineral - it's used for high temp windows
on heaters, pot belly stoves etc

>  AKA isinglass

Didn't know that. The last isinglass I used was a syrupy liquid got
from fish guts (ugh). Anyone else grew crystal gardens in isinglasss
solution ?

> Formica and melamine are some kind of hard thermosetting plastic.

Formica is IIRC a trade name for the phenolic-based surfacing sheet,
I presume melamine is a generic term, and perhaps mica is too, like
fridge or hoover or jeep

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2001\05\15@045811 by Kevin Blain
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Isn't Hoover a trade name of Hoover, and Jeep a trade name of Jeep?

Vacuum cleaner and 4x4 multipurpose vehicle might be better generic terms

fridge is AFAIK simply an abbreviation for refridgerator, which is a cooling
device, and also the nick name for an ex- NY Giants football player <grin>

Regards, Kevin


> Formica is IIRC a trade name for the phenolic-based surfacing sheet,
> I presume melamine is a generic term, and perhaps mica is too, like
> fridge or hoover or jeep

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2001\05\15@072759 by David Harmon

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On Tue, 15 May 2001 20:17:58 +1200, Jinx <RemoveMEjoecolquittTakeThisOuTspamCLEAR.NET.NZ>
wrote:

>>  AKA isinglass
>
>Didn't know that. The last isinglass I used was a syrupy liquid got
>from fish guts (ugh). Anyone else grew crystal gardens in isinglasss
>solution ?

"Isinglass" can on occasion mean at least three different things:
 1. Gelatin from fish guts - used in food and as "fish glue"
 2. Sodium silicate - waterglass (what you grow crystals in - the kit
sells under the trade name "Magic Rocks" in USA toy stores.)
 3. Mica
    "The wheels are yella, the upholstery's brown,
     The dashboard's genuine leather,
     With isinglass curtains you can roll right down
     in case there's a change in the weather"
        - "Surrey With the Fringe on Top"
        Rodgers & Hammerstein _Oklahoma_ ca. 1955

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2001\05\15@074719 by Kashif Ali

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It is a insulator between heat sink and part (high power) like
transistor, regulator and power amplifiers.

Kashif ali

Jinx wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\05\15@081035 by Bob Ammerman

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Fridge is short for Fridgadaire - another brand name that has been 'stolen'
by popular usage.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kevin Blain" <kevinbEraseMEspam.....WOODANDDOUGLAS.CO.UK>
To: <EraseMEPICLISTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 4:47 AM
Subject: Re: [OT]: What's "mica" ?


> Isn't Hoover a trade name of Hoover, and Jeep a trade name of Jeep?
>
> Vacuum cleaner and 4x4 multipurpose vehicle might be better generic terms
>
> fridge is AFAIK simply an abbreviation for refridgerator, which is a
cooling
{Quote hidden}

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2001\05\15@081834 by Jinx

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> Isn't Hoover a trade name of Hoover, and Jeep a trade name
> of Jeep?

That's what I meant - people use the eponymous "hoover" as a
noun or verb when in fact it's a trade name

> fridge is AFAIK simply an abbreviation for refridgerator,

Possibly Frigidair ?

As you know, there are many words that are used in Americanish
that have a completely different word in English (or what Winston
Churchill called "Two countries separated by a common language"),
eg pavement/sidewalk  aluminium/aluminum. The mica I was asking
about is definitely a decorative or protective sheet/edging finish,
not painted (sorry Mike)

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2001\05\15@082045 by Jinx

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>   2. Sodium silicate - waterglass (what you grow crystals in - the kit
> sells under the trade name "Magic Rocks" in USA toy stores.)

That's the one

>   3. Mica
>      "The wheels are yella, the upholstery's brown,
>       The dashboard's genuine leather,
>       With isinglass curtains you can roll right down
>       in case there's a change in the weather"
>          - "Surrey With the Fringe on Top"
>          Rodgers & Hammerstein _Oklahoma_ ca. 1955

Everybody sing-along-a-Dave, c'mon, in for the chorus

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2001\05\15@092732 by Kevin Blain

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Referring to the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, as one does in these
situations.....

Jeep, and Hoover are both (listed as) proper nouns, it mentions the company
in the case of Hoover, but simply says "four wheel drive vehicle" and "US
origin" for the Jeep.

Fridge is not listed as a proper noun, and simply as a colloquialism, for
cooling room or cupboard. I note that I spelled refrigerator incorrectly in
my earlier email.

see also
techref.massmind.org/cgi-bin/wnsearch.exe?q=fridge
techref.massmind.org/cgi-bin/wnsearch.exe?q=hoover
http://techref.massmind.org/cgi-bin/wnsearch.exe?q=jeep

Regards, Kevin


From: "Bob Ammerman" <RemoveMERAMMERMANKILLspamspamPRODIGY.NET>

> Fridge is short for Fridgadaire - another brand name that has been
'stolen'
> by popular usage.

> {Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@095949 by James Paul

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All,

And I always thought it stood for 'REFRIGERATOR".
Just goes to show you it's always something.

                               Regards,

                                 Jim



On Tue, 15 May 2001, Bob Ammerman wrote:

>
> Fridge is short for Fridgadaire - another brand name that has been 'stolen'
> by popular usage.
>
> {Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@103454 by Shawn Yates

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Mica is a thin crystal.  We find it in river beds a lot.  Its pretty neat
looking.  It can be peeled apart into thin transparent layers.

{Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@105357 by Don Hyde

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Mica is a naturally occurring, and fairly common mineral.  It is clear and
shiny and cleaves easily into thin sheets.  It has a long history of use as
an insulator in the electronics industry.  Since it is cheap, stable, not
known to be toxic, and shiny, it is also frequently used as an ingredient in
shiny "metal flake" paints, which could probably more properly be known as
"mica flake".

It has been used as an insulator in capacitors, and as the insulating
supports in vacuum tubes.  Check your local museum or rock musician's supply
of vacuum tubes and look inside.  You will see flat, slightly cloudy-looking
transparent sheets supporting the various metallic parts inside.  That is
mica.

The best supplies are in South America (and possibly Africa as well).  At
the beginning of WWII, it was worried that U-boats might cut off these
supplies, so a research effort was mounted to find a synthetic substitute.
The result was named Formica, since it was a substitute "for mica".

The U-boats were less successful than Hitler hoped, the natural substance
had somewhat better properties, and besides, that's what everyone was used
to working with, so the new material was not needed for vacuum tubes.

When the Queen Mary was pressed into service to carry troops across the
Atlantic (my father was one of those), her owners asked that the fine wood
paneling be removed for safekeeping, and some sort of substitute be
installed in its place.  The engineers who had created Formica, and the
company they worked for, saw an opportunity, and demonstrated their ability
to print a wood grain onto their new manmade material.

Tens of thousands of US soldiers saw those synthetically-panelled walls, and
saw them survive tens of thousands of soldiers.  So when the war was over
and they were offered the same material for their new kitchen counters, they
bought it in huge quantities.

> {Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@122139 by John Craft

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Here endith the lession........

Informative, Interesting, and to the point.

Bravo.

John C.

-----Original Message-----
From: Don Hyde [DonHSTOPspamspamspam_OUTAXONN.COM]
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 9:52 AM
To: spamBeGonePICLISTSTOPspamspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [OT]: What's "mica" ?


Mica is a naturally occurring, and fairly common mineral.  It is clear
and
shiny and cleaves easily into thin sheets.  It has a long history of use
as
an insulator in the electronics industry.  Since it is cheap, stable,
not
known to be toxic, and shiny, it is also frequently used as an
ingredient in
shiny "metal flake" paints, which could probably more properly be known
as
"mica flake".

It has been used as an insulator in capacitors, and as the insulating
supports in vacuum tubes.  Check your local museum or rock musician's
supply
of vacuum tubes and look inside.  You will see flat, slightly
cloudy-looking
transparent sheets supporting the various metallic parts inside.  That
is
mica.

The best supplies are in South America (and possibly Africa as well).
At
the beginning of WWII, it was worried that U-boats might cut off these
supplies, so a research effort was mounted to find a synthetic
substitute.
The result was named Formica, since it was a substitute "for mica".

The U-boats were less successful than Hitler hoped, the natural
substance
had somewhat better properties, and besides, that's what everyone was
used
to working with, so the new material was not needed for vacuum tubes.

When the Queen Mary was pressed into service to carry troops across the
Atlantic (my father was one of those), her owners asked that the fine
wood
paneling be removed for safekeeping, and some sort of substitute be
installed in its place.  The engineers who had created Formica, and the
company they worked for, saw an opportunity, and demonstrated their
ability
to print a wood grain onto their new manmade material.

Tens of thousands of US soldiers saw those synthetically-panelled walls,
and
saw them survive tens of thousands of soldiers.  So when the war was
over
and they were offered the same material for their new kitchen counters,
they
bought it in huge quantities.

{Quote hidden}

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2001\05\15@133654 by Alice Campbell

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Please bear with one more factoid.  Formica's derivation is
not from mica, although mica flakes have been used as
decoration in it.  The word is derived from formic acid, one
of the components in the plastic of which it is made.

alice



> Here endith the lession........
>
> Informative, Interesting, and to the point.
>
> Bravo.
>
> John C.
>
> {Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@135037 by Alice Campbell

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Never mind what i said don hyde had it right, i looked it up
here:

www.formica.com/north_america/company/history/history.j
sp?mode=

alice


{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@154010 by Robert Francisco

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In the past, it is also used to insulate the attic of houses here in the
colder section of the US.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Alice Campbell" <TakeThisOuTacampbell.....spamTakeThisOuTSCSENGINEERS.COM>
To: <TakeThisOuTPICLISTKILLspamspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 12:51 PM
Subject: Re: [OT]: What's "mica" ?


{Quote hidden}

> > > {Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@154420 by Dave King

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At 08:17 PM 5/15/01 +1200, you wrote:
> >  AKA isinglass
>
>Didn't know that. The last isinglass I used was a syrupy liquid got
>from fish guts (ugh). Anyone else grew crystal gardens in isinglasss
>solution ?

Used it a bunch to clarify beer and wine just before they come out of
the primary. Not sure I'd want to grow fish crystals.....

D

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2001\05\15@173138 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza

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>The best supplies are in South America (and possibly Africa as well).  At
>the beginning of WWII, it was worried that U-boats might cut off these
>supplies, so a research effort was mounted to find a synthetic substitute.
>The result was named Formica, since it was a substitute "for mica".

       Very interesting history!

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2001\05\15@183606 by Jinx

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> supplies, so a research effort was mounted to find a synthetic
> substitute. The result was named Formica, since it was a substitute
> "for mica".

Thank you very much Don, that's just what I needed to know. Now you've
mentioned  it, a very distant bell rings that I've heard that before

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2001\05\15@183609 by Jinx

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> Jeep, and Hoover are both (listed as) proper nouns, it mentions the
> company in the case of Hoover, but simply says "four wheel drive
> vehicle" and "US origin" for the Jeep.

Hoover is an eponym, ie it's a product named after a person (William
Hoover), like sandwich, cardigan, wellington, tarmac. Sometimes a
dictionary won't give the whole story, but a derivative source like
Brewers Phrase & Fable will

I understood that "jeep" came from GP - general purpose (vehicle)

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2001\05\16@021045 by Chris Cox

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Football Player: as in "William 'THE Fridge' Perry", Chicago Bears. We
miss you, Perry.

Chris Cox

Kevin Blain wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\05\16@164925 by Lee Jones

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> I understood that "jeep" came from GP - general purpose (vehicle)

That's my understanding too.  In world war II, the US Army
had "truck, 1/4 ton general purpose".  Primary manufacturer
was the Willeys (sp?) company.  It was nicknamed jeep and
in abundant supply after the war as surplus.

                                               Lee

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