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'[OT]: Was copper, now Lead?'
2000\09\12@154615 by Dan Michaels

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"Alan B. Pearce" wrote:
>>That's why the Health and Safety Executive in the UK are investigating
>>levels during service work - from what I've heard about asthma most
>>cases of childhood asthma are caused by the mother smoking during
>>pregnancy. Certainly there seems a much greater number of asthma
>>sufferers now than there used to be, or is it just a greater awareness?.
>
>I suffer from asthma which appears to be a hereditary problem. However I have a
>theory that the increased incidence of asthma that occurs now is due to a very
>wide range of things from environmental factors such as smoking and other fumes
>we breathe through food additives such as colourings and preservatives. I
do not
>think that any one thing can be pointed at as a cause or source of the problem.
>


Apparently asthma rates are increasing dramatically - in the US at least.
I believe it is supposedly due to too much exposure to chemicals, cleaners,
paints, air pollution, etc, in our modern environments - ie, "better living
thru chemistry".

There is also something called "sick building syndrome", in which people
develop respiratory problems - esp in newer buildings - where the air
is re-circulated with only "minimal" amounts of fresh air added to the
cycle. Re-circulation concentrates all kinds of chemicals that are
out-gassed from carpets, paints, as well as cigarette smoke,
perfumes, etc. Aparently this idea was commonly "poo-poohed" 10
years or so ago, but is widely accepted today.

I have always suffered from allergies, but the sickest year I ever
had was when the org I was working for in 1990 moved into a newly-
built building with sealed windows and "calibrated" air flow rates.
By the end of each day, I could no longer breathe - [believe it or
not, I quit working there, partially because of this].

I also read recently that an inordinate percentage of air travelers
come down with respiratory problems - colds, flu, etc - after flights.
Airplane air is highly recirculated with very little outside air added.

All this stuff has probably not been proven 100% - but gives you
something to think about [esp when you're bored and/or too lazy
to concentrate].

- danM

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2000\09\13@002409 by robertf

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Alan,
You can add particle board/press board on your list of bad 'out-gasser'. I
think I read somewhere that it contained formaldehyde.
Robertf

{Original Message removed}

2000\09\13@060557 by Alan B. Pearce

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>You can add particle board/press board on your list of bad 'out-gasser'. I
>think I read somewhere that it contained formaldehyde.

I know this has been a problem in the past in New Zealand, and the standard way of getting around it in the modern all sealed house was to coat the board (typically used as flooring) with a polyurethane finish.

Another item to add to this is the number of Polynesian people that go to new Zealand to live have high asthma incidence, but there is virtually no incidence in their home islands. Often when they return home the problem is greatly reduced, if it does not go away totally. This does seem to me to have a link to environmental factors like diet (processed foods etc).

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2000\09\13@070538 by Andy Howard

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> From: "Dan Michaels" <oricomspamKILLspamLYNX.SNI.NET>
> "Alan B. Pearce" wrote:


> >I suffer from asthma which appears to be a hereditary problem. However I
have a
> >theory that the increased incidence of asthma that occurs now is due to a
very
> >wide range of things from environmental factors such as smoking and other
fumes
> >we breathe through food additives such as colourings and preservatives. I
> do not
> >think that any one thing can be pointed at as a cause or source of the
problem.
> >
>
>
> Apparently asthma rates are increasing dramatically - in the US at least.
> I believe it is supposedly due to too much exposure to chemicals,
cleaners,
> paints, air pollution, etc, in our modern environments - ie, "better
living
> thru chemistry".


I was reading about some recent epidemiological research where it was
suggested that many allergies, including some types of asthma, are possibly
due to our modern living environments being too clinical.

I always knew there was a good reason for my messy apartment.














.

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