Searching \ for '[OT]: US and Metric System: another viewpoint' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=another+viewpoint
Search entire site for: 'US and Metric System: another viewpoint'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT]: US and Metric System: another viewpoint'
2002\03\09@062853 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
Hi,

I'm all metric and I sometimes struggle with 3/16" and other such insane
'human' divisions. At least the error with which the original meter
estimated the equator is several orders of magnitudes lower than the same
thing for the foot and inch (whose foot ? whose thumb ? And that poor cow
*** standard for degrees ? - do I have to keep a cow to have a standard
now, since water is obviously for people with small brains ?).

The metric system is for people with small brains who wish to use it for
other things than, numerology to decipher a cookie recipe without risking
to poison anyone, or building spacecraft that end up trying to mine the
underground of the red planet. As such it concentrates on making
everything uniformly scaled, and you're right, it's boring when compared
to the imperial system. Once you learn to divide and multiply numbers
between 0 and 9 by themselves it's all a boring and repeating task.

As to the benefits of the increased flexibility imparted to the brains of
those learning the imperial system, by virtue of its incredibly 'human'
divisor system, I'd recommend going all the way and learning Chinese. I am
sure that that will impart even more flexibility, on account of its
reasonable number of glyphs.

The only thing I'm really amazed of, is the fact that there was only ONE
underground Mars probe attempt under these conditions.

$0.02

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\03\09@090738 by Roman Black

flavicon
face
Peter L. Peres wrote:

> As to the benefits of the increased flexibility imparted to the brains of
> those learning the imperial system, by virtue of its incredibly 'human'
> divisor system, I'd recommend going all the way and learning Chinese. I am
> sure that that will impart even more flexibility, on account of its
> reasonable number of glyphs.

Hi Peter, have you tried this? I'm a single-language
English speaking person and genuinely curious as to the
cost in money and time to learn to write Chinese. Is
there like a course you can buy? :o)
-Roman

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\03\09@105928 by Vit

picon face
<SNIP>
> As to the benefits of the increased flexibility imparted to the brains of
> those learning the imperial system, by virtue of its incredibly 'human'
> divisor system, I'd recommend going all the way and learning Chinese. I am
> sure that that will impart even more flexibility, on account of its
> reasonable number of glyphs.
<snip>

Peter,

Recently, I watched "Three Seasons" (Chinese, subtitled) and the guy reading
a book all the time.  I hit "pause" to see what the cover says - the
characters weren't Latin, but they didn't look like traditional hyeroglyphs,
either.  Think about how the Chinese write e-mails - they're using the same
keyboard as you and me.  Maybe someone with Chinese background can explain
this.

BTW, I'm not trying to argue with you - I, too, like the Metric system.  ;-)

Vitaliy

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\03\10@144043 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
>Peter L. Peres wrote:
>
>>As to the benefits of the increased flexibility imparted to the brains
>>of those learning the imperial system, by virtue of its incredibly
>>'human' divisor system, I'd recommend going all the way and learning
>>Chinese. I am sure that that will impart even more flexibility, on
>>account of its reasonable number of glyphs.
>
>Hi Peter, have you tried this? I'm a single-language
>English speaking person and genuinely curious as to the
>cost in money and time to learn to write Chinese. Is
>there like a course you can buy? :o)
>-Roman

No I haven't but I learned too many languages instead of other things and
I know what is involved. Anyway you'd probably need a small pickup truck
to take the dictionary set that comes with the course home. This I know
for sure.  Much bigger than Britannica etc.

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\03\10@144052 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
>Peter,
>
>Recently, I watched "Three Seasons" (Chinese, subtitled) and the guy
>reading a book all the time.  I hit "pause" to see what the cover says -
>the characters weren't Latin, but they didn't look like traditional
>hyeroglyphs, either.  Think about how the Chinese write e-mails - they're
>using the same keyboard as you and me.  Maybe someone with Chinese
>background can explain this.

I think that you are referring to 'simplified' Chinese. Afaik there are 3
main ways to write Chinese and several more regional/traditional ways.
One of them is indeed simple (but I don't know it - I do not speak Chinese
at all - it was just meant as an example). I was not trying to flame-bait
anybody, it's just that you get to have strong opinions on this when
trying to match or machine machine parts. Keeping two sets of tools is
almost impossible for most people. There are a number of frustrated
messages on this on the net. From both sides of the pond. I mean Atlantic
Ocean ;-).

And my message was not meant as a response to someone else's message about
flexibility, so I did not mean any offence.

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\03\11@081520 by Roman Black

flavicon
face
> >Hi Peter, have you tried this? I'm a single-language
> >English speaking person and genuinely curious as to the
> >cost in money and time to learn to write Chinese. Is
> >there like a course you can buy? :o)
> >-Roman
>
> No I haven't but I learned too many languages instead of other things and
> I know what is involved. Anyway you'd probably need a small pickup truck
> to take the dictionary set that comes with the course home. This I know
> for sure.  Much bigger than Britannica etc.
>
> Peter

Thanks Peter. :o)
-Roman

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spam_OUTlistservTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2002 , 2003 only
- Today
- New search...