Searching \ for '[OT]: Test car battery' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/power/batterys.htm?key=battery
Search entire site for: 'Test car battery'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT]: Test car battery'
2006\04\05@174118 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Wed, 2006-04-05 at 13:42 -0500, Danny Sauer wrote:
> Peter wrote regarding 'Re: [EE]: Test car battery' on Wed, Apr 05 at 13:38:
> > Why bother ? Just buy your gas by mail order from Canada and you will
> > have all the good feeling, without the bad ice for one month a year ?
> > <g>
>
> Wait, Canadian ice goes bad?  I'll stick with my reliable ice in the
> USA then, thanks.
>
> --Danny, pretty sure Canada is precisely as portrayed on South Park :)

Oh man, that movie was hilarious!

Square tires, can't really say our tires are square up here, but that
might just be something I don't know aboot... :)

2006\04\06@104617 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
(Tag changed)

Dave,

On Tue, 4 Apr 2006 17:47:30 -0400, David VanHorn wrote:

> >
> > We haven't invaded Canada yet..??
>
>
> Shhh.. My wife's a canadian!

And I suppose comments about your invading her would be completely unacceptable...  ;-)

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\04\06@132717 by David VanHorn

picon face
>
>
> And I suppose comments about your invading her would be completely
> unacceptable...  ;-)


To some, I suppose.


Her family has a vacation place at Pt Roberts WA, a little bit that got cut
off when they drew the line.  It's US, but you have to go through Canada to
get there by land.
Maybe one of these days we might move up that way. It would be nice.
I'd love Banff, at least in the summer.

--
Feel the power of the dark side!  Atmel AVR

2006\04\06@133450 by Marcel Birthelmer

picon face
Banf and only Banf!

On 4/6/06, David VanHorn <spam_OUTdvanhornTakeThisOuTspammicrobrix.com> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > And I suppose comments about your invading her would be completely
> > unacceptable...  ;-)
>
>
> To some, I suppose.
>
>
> Her family has a vacation place at Pt Roberts WA, a little bit that got
> cut
> off when they drew the line.  It's US, but you have to go through Canada
> to
> get there by land.
> Maybe one of these days we might move up that way. It would be nice.
> I'd love Banff, at least in the summer.
>
> --
> Feel the power of the dark side!  Atmel AVR
> -

2006\04\06@141506 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
part 1 1373 bytes content-type:text/plain (decoded 7bit)

On Thu, 2006-04-06 at 13:27 -0400, David VanHorn wrote:
> >
> >
> > And I suppose comments about your invading her would be completely
> > unacceptable...  ;-)
>
>
> To some, I suppose.
>
>
> Her family has a vacation place at Pt Roberts WA, a little bit that got cut
> off when they drew the line.  It's US, but you have to go through Canada to
> get there by land.
> Maybe one of these days we might move up that way. It would be nice.
> I'd love Banff, at least in the summer.

Yes, I noticed Pt Roberts on the map when I visited Vancouver last year,
very strange! :)

My trip to Vancouver was an excellent opportunity to investigate the
"longest undefended border". It was truly an "odd" thing to see. The GPS
said I was standing meters from the border, but my eyes showed an area
of cut grass, and a 1' tall farmer's fence, with a small forest across
the border. If I didn't have the map there is NO way I would have known
that crossing that patch of grass meant entering another country! Very
cool.

I have a picture of it at my desk (attached to this post), I love
pointing to the picture and asking people "what is that"? Nobody has
guessed correctly, and they usually don't believe when I tell them
that's the Canada/US border! :)

TTYL



part 2 39424 bytes content-type:image/jpeg; name=DSC02989_sized.JPG (decode)


part 3 35 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
(decoded 7bit)

2006\04\08@123930 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> My trip to Vancouver was an excellent opportunity to investigate the
> "longest undefended border". It was truly an "odd" thing to see. The
> GPS
> said I was standing meters from the border, but my eyes showed an
> area
> of cut grass, and a 1' tall farmer's fence, with a small forest
> across
> the border. If I didn't have the map there is NO way I would have
> known
> that crossing that patch of grass meant entering another country!
> Very
> cool.

Much of Europe is like that. You can drive through most of the EU
without much hope of seeing a border. My 1st ever European border
crossing (on land) was France/Germany, so we looked out for it
carefully. We were perhaps 100 metres past it before we discovered it
had passed by.

There's quite a contrast getting in and out of Hungary. And if you are
a truck driver, getting into Slovakia from the Czech republic takes
typically about 3 days I'm told. The queue of trucks stretched for
many miles/km from the border.



       RM


2006\04\10@043455 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>> If I didn't have the map there is NO way I would have
>> known that crossing that patch of grass meant entering
>> another country!  Very cool.
>
>Much of Europe is like that. You can drive through most
>of the EU without much hope of seeing a border. My 1st
>ever European border crossing (on land) was France/Germany,
>so we looked out for it carefully. We were perhaps 100
>metres past it before we discovered it had passed by.

Just after we moved to the Uk we decided to drive to Cologne for a show.
Drove across Belgium under the glare of street lights all the way down the
multilane highway, crossed the border into Germany into darkness. The street
lighting stopped at the border.

>There's quite a contrast getting in and out of Hungary.
>And if you are a truck driver, getting into Slovakia
>from the Czech republic takes typically about 3 days I'm
>told. The queue of trucks stretched for many miles/km
>from the border.

This may have changed now a bunch of formerly East European countries have
become part of the EU.


2006\04\10@045054 by Bob Barr

flavicon
face
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 09:34:52 +0100, "Alan B. Pearce" wrote:

>Just after we moved to the Uk we decided to drive to Cologne for a show.
>Drove across Belgium under the glare of street lights all the way down the
>multilane highway, crossed the border into Germany into darkness. The street
>lighting stopped at the border.
>

If you want to see a really stark difference between two countries,
zoom in on the Korean peninsula at this link. (Large file - 950Kbyte)

See it you can guess where the 38th parallel is.

http://www.ee.sc.edu/classes/Spring01/elct580/earthlights.jpg


Regards, Bob

2006\04\10@063557 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> http://www.ee.sc.edu/classes/Spring01/elct580/earthlights.jpg

London's burning.

But, most surprisingly, what sort of Reunion is occurring near
Mauritius?




       RM

2006\04\10@072456 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
Alan,

On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 09:34:52 +0100, Alan B. Pearce wrote:
>...
> Drove across Belgium under the glare of street lights all the way down the
> multilane highway, crossed the border into Germany into darkness. The street
> lighting stopped at the border.

Did you know that Belgium is the only country in the World where all of the motorways are lit (according to
Jeremy Clarkson)?

The borders do exist if you look carefully - there is usually a sign saying the name of the country you are
entering, then a little further on another which has their speed-limits, with pictograms to indicate what they
apply to (motorways, other major roads, towns).  France is the only place I know of where the speed limit
lowers in rain (to 110kph from 130 in the dry) so their signs include this.

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\04\10@074925 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Russell McMahon wrote:

>> My trip to Vancouver was an excellent opportunity to investigate the
>> "longest undefended border".

> Much of Europe is like that.

/Much/ shorter borders, though :)

> You can drive through most of the EU without much hope of seeing a
> border.

Before it was the EU, that was a bit different. Most roads crossing borders
had some kind of border post, even though many of them didn't really do
much.

>> there is NO way I would have known that crossing that patch of grass
>> meant entering another country!

But you always (well, in my lifetime :) could cross the borders by foot,
hiking through the countryside far away from roads, without ever noticing
that there was a border. Not even a patch of cut grass.


> There's quite a contrast getting in and out of Hungary. And if you are a
> truck driver, getting into Slovakia from the Czech republic takes
> typically about 3 days I'm told.

If you wanted contrast, you should have been there during the Cold War
years :)  Driving through the border felt like going behind enemy lines...
Or when hiking in North-Eastern Bavarian forests, a very nice region around
the former East German border, quiet, remote and not much inhabited, and
all of a sudden you met the border... steel and concrete, electric fences,
towers with machine guns, heavily armed patrols, lighted by night, "the
whole nine yards" :)  A surreal experience.

Gerhard

2006\04\10@080816 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>> You can drive through most of the EU without
>> much hope of seeing a border.
>
>Before it was the EU, that was a bit different.

Even now, on many main roads there is a semblance of a "border post" in some
form of parking area where traffic police and customs may set up to catch
unwary truck drivers with bad paperwork.


>If you wanted contrast, you should have been there
>during the Cold War years :)

A cousin of mine took a Bedford camper van through the Soviet Satellite
countries during the 70's. The stories she had to tell about crossing the
borders were many, along with some of the other hilarious tales she had to
tell of situations that arose because of the way the economy worked there at
that time.

2006\04\10@111521 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
Gerhard,

On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 08:49:04 -0300, Gerhard Fiedler wrote:

> Russell McMahon wrote:
>
>...
> > You can drive through most of the EU without much hope of seeing a
> > border.
>
> Before it was the EU, that was a bit different. Most roads crossing borders
> had some kind of border post, even though many of them didn't really do
> much.

I drove a group from the UK to Warsaw in 1977, and it was fascinating!  Borders such as Belgium-West Germany
were a set of speed limits stepping down to 10kph, then a white line across the road next to a hut with nobody
in it, then the speed limit went back up again, and you'd crossed!

{Quote hidden}

Indeed!  We crossed the "Iron Curtain" at the main border point (on the E8 I think - I forget the name of the
place) and as you say, the facilities to stop people crossing without permission were amazing.  A half-mile
single-track road with guard-towers all along, so they'd have plenty of time to shoot anyone who tried to make
a break for it, then a multi-lane checkpoint rather like a succession of toll-booths, where you weren't
allowed to park next to the booth (presumably so you couldn't pollute them with Western ideas) while you
waited, and it took about half an hour while they checked passports at some other place before they allowed
you to pass into East Germany.  You had to have bought visas beforehand, which were printed on what looked
like toilet paper, and you needed one for each entry or transit, which we got wrong.  We were spending the
night in West Berlin, so that's two transits - W.Germany to Berlin, Berlin to Poland, so we only had half the
number we needed, and had to negotiate getting extra ones (for extra money, naturally!).  There was a list of
prohibited items and the final stage was an armed guard who asked us about them in turn, and you had to answer
"No" to each one (things like subversive literature, radio transmitters, porn, firearms, explosives).  

On the way out it was worse - every car was searched thoughroughly, they had mirrors on wheels that were used
to check underneath the car, and long rods for prodding into parts of the car to check that nobody was hiding.  
Unloading a car full of 4 peoples' luggage wasn't fun, but you have to do what you're told!  I wanted a photo
of the guard towers but my passengers were all too scared to take one, so I drove with one hand as I set up
the camera then just popped it up and clicked the shutter.  Not a bad photo, considering  :-)  I found out
later that you weren't allowed to take photos of *any* Government stuff, including trains and busses, so a
lucky escape there!

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\04\10@160148 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Howard Winter wrote:

> I wanted a photo of the guard towers but my passengers were all too
> scared to take one, so I drove with one hand as I set up the camera then
> just popped it up and clicked the shutter.

I'd say they weren't scared, they were just being prudent :)

> I found out later that you weren't allowed to take photos of *any*
> Government stuff, including trains and busses, so a lucky escape there!

Pretty lucky indeed. You didn't want to get into trouble with those guys...

Gerhard

2006\04\11@071750 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> ... so I drove with one hand as I set up
> the camera then just popped it up and clicked the shutter.  Not a
> bad photo, considering  :-)  I found out
> later that you weren't allowed to take photos of *any* Government
> stuff, including trains and busses, so a
> lucky escape there!

Sounds familiar :-).
Hungarian border policeman threatened to confiscate my camera even
though it was turned off and I had carefully not taken any forbidden
photos.

Thai soldier on guard duty at Royal palace with live ammunition was
not impressed with me photographing their non-ceremonial changing of
the guard. Bullets were counted across from old to new shift.

At Clarence house 2 friendly coppers showed us how to skirt around the
road blocking jumbo bin and walk up besides Queen mum's house and walk
towards Buck house. As we walked across the far face of CH I decided
to take a photo. Stood on tip toes with camera held above iron paling
fence to take photo. Cop in till then unseen guard box came charging
out VERY enthusiastically. Once he realised I was 'only' taking photos
he skidded to a halt and turned back into an affable British Bobby. I
think that on Royal personage protection duties they are ultra trained
to ooze friendliness to all and sundry and to be prepared to kill and
be killed at a moments notice when the occasion arrives. (When not
if - but they all hope the when is a long long time coming).

I have various photos of XRay machine screens at various airports et
al. These should NEVER be available for viewing by the public. If I
can photograph them by fair means or foul then joe badguy can take
advantage of the information provided.

German policeman at Koln cathedral who was taking an obnoxious beggar
away was unimpressed at being photographed but did nothing. The lady
full-riot-kitted police nearby were happy to be photographed.

I have police photos from about 10? countries. Most probably not aware
of being photographed but in most places one doesn't feel fearful of
their reactions.  In a few countries this isn't the case.

Man in ?Arizona gunshop with singlet top, superbeard, wearing 3
handguns,  had confederate flags, Ronald Regan posters and a LARGE "NO
CAMERAS" sign. Mine was off when he accosted me and asked if it was
on. Scared. Me scared? Yep. He turned out to be a very pleasant fellow
and was happy to pose for a photo as long as certain parts of the
store didn't feature in it.



       RM

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2006 , 2007 only
- Today
- New search...