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'[OT]: Re: 802.11x networks a health hazard?'
2003\05\23@125908 by Ned Konz

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On Friday 23 May 2003 06:46 am, Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff wrote:

> And a little earlier than that - using lead as a food additive was
> considered the norm. Even today, people continue to purchase
> aluminium saucepans.

What's the problem with that?

There's no evidence that there is a health risk associated with aluminum pans.

Or are you referring to the (now discredited) study that linked aluminum with Alzheimer's disease?

From the Alzheimer's association at
http://www.alz.org/ResourceCenter/FactSheets/FSAluminum.pdf

Although research into the Alzheimer's/aluminum connection continues, most mainstream health professionals believe, based on current knowledge, that exposure to aluminum is not a significant risk factor. Public health bodies sharing this conviction include the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Health Canada. Further, it is unlikely that people can significantly reduce their exposure to aluminum through such measures as avoiding aluminum-containing cookware, foil, beverage cans, medications, or other products. Even if aluminum were clearly implicated in Alzheimer's, these routes of exposure account for only a small percentage of the average person's intake.

-- Ned Konz
http://bike-nomad.com
GPG key ID: BEEA7EFE

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2003\05\23@130844 by Marc Nicholas

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The problem with *cheap* aluminum pans is that the surface continues to
oxidize and thus taints the taste of food sometimes AND pits.

For example, get a really cheap aluminum pot and use it to make fresh tomato
sauce a few times...even if you can't taste the alumina alpha, you'll find
the surface of the the pot degrades quite rapidly due to acidity. Same thing
happens with bases.

However, more expensive aluminum pots have a better anodizing process that
more-or-less removes this problem.

BTW...even though I've spelled it "aluminum", the element is really called
aluminium. If you don't believe me, ask the IUPAC ;-)


-marc

On 23/5/03 12:56, "Ned Konz" <spam_OUTnedTakeThisOuTspamBIKE-NOMAD.COM> wrote:

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Marc Nicholas Geekythings Inc. C/416.543.4896
UNIX, Database, Security and Networking Consulting

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2003\05\23@131740 by David VanHorn

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WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!!!

(Of something, anyway..)

There are significant risks, and insignificant risks, and in the end, the same 100% assured outcome.

You do, however, get to maximize your MTBF, and function at a higher level throughout, if you're careful.

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2003\05\23@132358 by David VanHorn

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At 01:08 PM 5/23/2003 -0400, Marc Nicholas wrote:

>The problem with *cheap* aluminum pans is that the surface continues to
>oxidize and thus taints the taste of food sometimes AND pits.

I remember something about Aluminum canteens and KoolAid, some toxic reaction IIRC.  From Boy Scout days, long ago.

Now they are all plastic, and taste like a refinery.
:-P

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2003\05\25@072731 by Russell McMahon

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> BTW...even though I've spelled it "aluminum", the element is really called
> aluminium. If you don't believe me, ask the IUPAC ;-)

And it SHOULD be called Alumium - which was the name given to it by its
original discoverer :-)
(And there are other "juries" who will even now debate the actual name -
IUPAC or no).


       Russell McMahon

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