Searching \ for '[OT]: Oil Cooling a Computer' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=oil+cooling+computer
Search entire site for: 'Oil Cooling a Computer'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT]: Oil Cooling a Computer'
2001\11\21@061236 by Ashley Roll

flavicon
face
Hi Everyone,

My flatmate wants to build a "case mod" computer (don't ask why.. same thing
as people putting ridiculous air spoilers cars I guess). So silly me
suggests that he build a completely Perspex case and fill it with a clear
mineral oil for cooling and effect and add some bubblers/lights/plastic fish
whatever.. Kind of a homage to the old Cray super computers I guess.

He is actually contemplating this.. So I though I should check to make sure
that mineral oil isn't going to damage any of the components on the boards..
I have heard of it being used in tesla coil capacitors so I have no doubt
that it can withstand the voltages, but will it attack any components?

Obviously We'd need a "dry" area for CDs, Hard disks and floppy and to
remove all the fans and arrange some kind of large heat sink to the air from
the oil, possible with a small pump to circulate the oil.. The CPU would
have its heat sink still, but no fan (probably wouldn't have one anyway..)

Is this do-able? has anyone tried it before?

Strange I know, but it keeps him amused..

Cheers,
Ash.

---
Ashley Roll
Digital Nemesis Pty Ltd
http://www.digitalnemesis.com
Mobile: +61 (0)417 705 718

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spam_OUTlistservTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\21@073610 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>He is actually contemplating this.. So I though I should check to make sure
>that mineral oil isn't going to damage any of the components on the
boards..
>I have heard of it being used in tesla coil capacitors so I have no doubt
>that it can withstand the voltages, but will it attack any components?

I suspect he would need to use the sort of oil they use in transformers for
cooling, but this has two problems. First the stuff is highly hydroscopic,
i.e. absorbs water, so needs to be kept sealed after installation, and
secondly (used to) contains PCB's, that highly toxic substance. I suspect
the latter is becoming less of a problem these days as stuff is changed for
non-PCB equivalents, but the first is likely to give problems if he cannot
seal all the connectors on the box.

How would he get connections from the video card or network card out?

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservKILLspamspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\21@073617 by cdb

flavicon
face
Can't answer 100% but I seem to recall the oil used in normal? computer
cooling was very special and very expensive. escapes me for the moment but
there is a Cray historical website that explains all about oils etc.

I wonder what the electrical properties of oil would be? Or did you mean a
sealed double glazed type case where the oil wanders around the cavity
between the outside and inside of the case- cos then you'd just need the
cooling effeffiency (too many ffs).

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\21@075537 by Jan Malina

flavicon
face
yes, this is feasable, quite some people have tried this even...
Normaly mineral oil doesn't conduct, so it should be safe. Be sure too cool
the oil with a radiator or something a bit more extreme like a phase change
cooler.


{Original Message removed}

2001\11\21@080826 by Dale Botkin
flavicon
face
I've seen one instance of someone submerging their motherboard in a
mineral oil (I think) bath in a Styrofoam cooler for cooling down an
overclocked chip.  The obvious problem I can see with a typical ATX type
system board would be sealing up all those connectors - don't know how
you'd go about that, some of them would seem to be very resistant to baing
made oil-tight, especially audio and RJ11/RJ45 connectors.

Dale
--
"Curiosity is the very basis of education and if you tell me that
curiosity killed the cat, I say only the cat died nobly."
         - Arnold Edinborough

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservKILLspamspam.....mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\21@081903 by ichard Phillips

flavicon
face
> Hi Everyone,
>
> My flatmate wants to build a "case mod" computer (don't ask
> why.. same thing
> as people putting ridiculous air spoilers cars I guess). So silly me
> suggests that he build a completely Perspex case and fill it
> with a clear
> mineral oil for cooling and effect and add some
> bubblers/lights/plastic fish
> whatever.. Kind of a homage to the old Cray super computers I guess.

Hi,

i've never heard of anyone doing it with oil, but...

Probably the greatest danger would be ensuring that the oil-cooling system
was sufficient to bleed off the heat from the CPU and heatsink - if he's
running a lower speed x86 chip (i.e. <500Mhz) i'd guess this wouldn't be too
much of a problem, but if running something like a 1-2Ghz P4/Athlon then it
may become an issue - they pump out a lot of heat.  The motherboard
controller chipset can also become hot on current systems, and are generally
equipped with heatsink/fans these days.  Perhaps some sort of pump would
need to be installed near the chips to ensure that the heat is taken away
from the source, or design an over-large heatsink.

Other than that, i guess the only thing would be to ensure that the oil
isn't conductive or corrosive.  Which i'd have to leave to others ; )

An odd idea, but it does sound workable.. not to mention intriguing : )

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email EraseMElistservspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\21@082611 by Ashley Roll

flavicon
face
> -----Original Message-----
> From: pic microcontroller discussion list
> [PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Alan B. Pearce
> Sent: Wednesday, 21 November 2001 9:24 PM
> To: @spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OT]: Oil Cooling a Computer
>
> How would he get connections from the video card or network card out?

Some small extention leads that go from the oil area to a dry area via a
seal..

Cheers,
Ash.

---
Ashley Roll
Digital Nemesis Pty Ltd
http://www.digitalnemesis.com
Mobile: +61 (0)417 705 718

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email KILLspamlistservKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\21@082622 by Ashley Roll

flavicon
face
I was thinking of not using a standard case at all. We would design a "tank"
with enough supports to hold all the boards which would be submerged in
oil.. Would then use small extension leads though a seal to a dry area with
a panel of normal connectors on it to connect to the outside world. All the
disks would also have to be in a dry area..

Cheers,
Ash.

---
Ashley Roll
Digital Nemesis Pty Ltd
http://www.digitalnemesis.com
Mobile: +61 (0)417 705 718




> {Original Message removed}

2001\11\21@090549 by Douglas Butler

flavicon
face
For oceanographic work we often have oil filled electronics bottles.
The oil prevents them from being crushed at deep ocean pressures.  Most
small bottles are filled with pharmaceutical grade mineral oil, the same
stuff you get at the drug store.  If you need something less viscous you
can use kerosene.  For manned subs they use specialized very expensive
super-inert stuff called DT oil, but I have never heard of mineral oil
or kerosene causing a problem.

As far as cooling, the oil will take the heat away from the components
much better than air ever could.  I don't think you will need a
circulation pump.  You may still need a fan and cooling fins to get the
heat out of the oil and into the air.

Try to have the dry components above the oil bath.  Oil seals tend to
leak.  Be aware of things like oil seeping through stranded wire between
the strands.

Good luck, it sounds like fun!

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\11\21@091609 by Chris Eddy

flavicon
face
Y'now, big transformers use purified diesel fuel. Why not try that? Just
tell your roommate to wear a fire retardant suit when he powers up the
machine. And to register with local fire fighting authorities.When he
tells his friends that his machine is a 400 Gig machine, and they don't
believe him, then he tells them it is a 400 Giga Joule machine.

Ashley Roll wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spamBeGonelistservspamBeGonespammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\21@171005 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza

flavicon
face
>My flatmate wants to build a "case mod" computer (don't ask why.. same thing
>as people putting ridiculous air spoilers cars I guess). So silly me
>suggests that he build a completely Perspex case and fill it with a clear
>mineral oil for cooling and effect and add some bubblers/lights/plastic fish
>whatever.. Kind of a homage to the old Cray super computers I guess.

       Everyone has a dream. Every dream craziest than other.

>He is actually contemplating this.. So I though I should check to make sure
>that mineral oil isn't going to damage any of the components on the boards..
>I have heard of it being used in tesla coil capacitors so I have no doubt
>that it can withstand the voltages, but will it attack any components?

       The crazy people in one of these overclock sites used an EXPENSIVE thing that filled a computer, and was refrigerated with liquid nitrogen. Nice stuff ;o)

>Is this do-able? has anyone tried it before?
>Strange I know, but it keeps him amused..

       Crazy, but if you want to do... ;o)))


---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

Alexandre Souza
TakeThisOuTtaitoEraseMEspamspam_OUTterra.com.br
http://planeta.terra.com.br/lazer/pinball/

---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservspamTakeThisOuTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\22@015453 by Andrew Hooper

flavicon
face
Cool Project :)

You know you could allways use distiled water, I built several water
capacitors
years ago when I was playing around with tesla coils, you need to evacuate
all
the air out as this can cause breakover.
You also myst be sure that its PURE water and there are no trace chemicals
I got my from a medical supply company.

Even better if you managed to get some inert colouring into the the water
but
then this may cause some reaction.

Then again you could go for the organic look and add some sugar to the
water, the sugar and electricity produces a proteen that apparently was
thought to have been the basis of life.

Andrew

{Original Message removed}

2001\11\22@133530 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
Hi Ashley,

mineral oil and some plastics do not mix. The plastic will bloat or
contract and crack. Then you have lots of oil in the living room. There
are other inert fluids that will work, however moving parts (hard drives,
fans) are NOT to be immersed. FYI big transmitter valves are cooled with
very pure water (yes water). It has potential differences of tens of kV
across it and no ill effects over tens of years, BUT they usually employ a
small group of specialists just to keep the water clean. There are several
options for immersion or cooling fluids that are much more inert than
mineral oil (pure glycerine is one that is neither poisonous nor very
dangerous - I have no idea if it is cheap but if you get odd looks when
buying 4 gallons of it know that it's because it is the principal
ingredient for making nitroglycerine).

High voltage capable of arcing acrossa gap is not to be immersed without
special care because while air will arc and that's that, some liquids will
decompose in the arc and start a chain reaction that will eventually short
the device out for good (assuming the the decomposing products are
conductive - such as anything that contains carbon aka soot when dry).

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
piclist-unsubscribe-requestEraseMEspam.....mitvma.mit.edu


2001\11\22@155613 by John Ferrell

flavicon
face
Bring the connections out the top, gravity will help. I would go for a high
quality synthetic motor oil to assure the inert nature. Ordinary mineral oil
may contain additives for stability that are detrimental. Plan ahead for
leaks and the possibility of capillary action traveling against gravity.

I know practical is not the goal but it is more practical to physically
attach the circuitry to "cold plates" that are cooled by coolant and provide
isolation between the circuit components and the coolant. At least that was
the more popular way for IBM in the early 90's. .

There was a 7090 storage array that was available as oil cooled in the early
1960's. It suffered intermittent outages from minute solder flecks shorting
circuits while the oil circulated. Filters helped but AFIK the only solution
was air cooling for that product.

BTW, a water spill is a lot easier to clean up than an oil spill!

John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"



{Original Message removed}

2001\11\23@091348 by Thomas McGahee

flavicon
face
Just make sure the fluid you use does not attack any of the plastic
materials that will be immersed in it. That includes cables.

The highest voltage you are going to see is no more than 400 volts,
and that is only inside the power supply cage. Don't worry about
insulation value... it will be hundreds of times higher than what
you need.

Realize that as the height of the oil increases in the box, the
effective oil PRESSURE will also increase. A tiny crack at the bottom
of the acrylic case will allow a sizeable oil flow, which is
gauranteed to be messy.

Want to get really weird? fill the bottom part up to just above the
cpu with a dark colored oil that is heavier than mineral oil. Fill
the rest with clear mineral oil. At first the oils will be somewhat
mixed together, but as you let it sit around for a while, the two
oils will separate into two distinct layers. You can test this by
putting the two oils into a sample container like a fruit jar. Seal
top and shake for a few seconds. Let sit, and it should eventually
settle out into two layers.

You now have a high-tech LAVA LAMP!
When the cpu heats up it will make the oil around it hotter and that
oil will float up into the clear mineral oil. As it cools, it will
slowly come back down into the darker oil.

The oil will be much better at removing heat than air. Remove any
fans on immersed objects (cpu and power supply). Final heat removal
will be through the walls of the plexiglass.

Have fun!

Fr. Thomas McGahee

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


2001\11\28@145127 by Lawrence Lile

flavicon
face
We used silicon oil for this kind of thing.  Inert, can't burn, doesn't
attack plastics.  It is used to fill high voltage transformers.
You (uh) won't be needing a cooling fan on your chip.  The silicon oil will
set up coonvection currents and carry away any heat fromn a heat sink.  Just
be sure the heat can escape the case.

Be sure to put some plastic fish, and little plastic pinwheels over the heat
sinkl for effect.

-- Lawrence

{Original Message removed}


'[OT]: Oil Cooling a Computer'
2001\12\04@064957 by rgristroph
picon face
{Quote hidden}

Lawrence>
Lawrence> We used silicon oil for this kind of thing.  Inert, can't
Lawrence> burn, doesn't attack plastics.  It is used to fill high
Lawrence> voltage transformers.  You (uh) won't be needing a cooling
Lawrence> fan on your chip.  The silicon oil will set up coonvection
Lawrence> currents and carry away any heat fromn a heat sink.  Just be
Lawrence> sure the heat can escape the case.
Lawrence>
Lawrence> Be sure to put some plastic fish, and little plastic
Lawrence> pinwheels over the heat sinkl for effect.

Using mineral oil in overclocking/cooling is a pretty standard.  A lot
of people have done it.  The most famous example (probably just
because the pictures are on the 'net) is Dr Ffreeze:

http://www.drffreeze.com/Test2.htm

I presume it would work just as well if the mineral oil was room
temperature, in fact when it is cold one of the problems you have is
frost or condensation getting into the oil and carried down to the
electronics.  If the oil is hot it should evaporate the moisture out.

This is another oil cooling experimenter:

I mention that URL only because I love the quote: "After playing
around with mineral oil, I found that it gets too gooey to pump at
about -30C, which pretty much rules out using it as the coolant if you
need to go down to those temperatures."

A little searching around on overclocking and liquid cooled computers
on the net can reveal some pretty crazy schemes.

--Rob

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2001 , 2002 only
- Today
- New search...