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'[OT]: Most common resistor values'
2000\08\22@003408 by Keelan Lightfoot

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I'm looking to stock my electronics parts box, and I am wondering: what
are the most common resistor values are that everyone uses in their
projects. Also, what about capacitor values?

I have moved out of home, and all my boards that I would suck parts off of
when I needed them had to stay home -- there's not the room in an
appartment that there used to be at home :)

thanks,
Keelan Lightfoot

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2000\08\22@060249 by mike

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On Mon, 21 Aug 2000 21:11:18 -0700, you wrote:

>I'm looking to stock my electronics parts box, and I am wondering: what
>are the most common resistor values are that everyone uses in their
>projects. Also, what about capacitor values?
>
>I have moved out of home, and all my boards that I would suck parts off of
>when I needed them had to stay home -- there's not the room in an
>appartment that there used to be at home :)
>
>thanks,
>Keelan Lightfoot
If you're not doing much analogue, I'd say a minimum would be 1, 2.2
and 4.7 in each decade from 100R to 1M
Cap-wise, probably 33p (for xtals), 100p,1n,10n,100n,1u,10u and 100u
would be a minimum.

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2000\08\22@062150 by Andy Howard

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Keelan Lightfoot" <spam_OUTkeelanTakeThisOuTspamVADER.KOOTENAY.NET>
To: <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, August 22, 2000 5:11 AM
Subject: [OT]: Most common resistor values


> I'm looking to stock my electronics parts box, and I am wondering: what
> are the most common resistor values are that everyone uses in their
> projects. Also, what about capacitor values?
> I have moved out of home, and all my boards that I would suck parts off of
> when I needed them had to stay home -- there's not the room in an
> appartment that there used to be at home :)



To some extent it will depend on what kind of projects you're doing, but for
general pic, digital and analogue work here's my best guess.

Don't forget that if you're stuck for a part, in non-critical applications
you can get away with using the next value or two up/down if you're out of
the right one - for critical applications you can make the right value by
series/parallel combinations of other values.

Resistors are simple, many component suppliers for a very few dollars will
sell you a pack of ten of each value in the E12 series  (10, 12, 15, 18, 22,
27, 33, 39, 47, 56, 68 and 82 and their decade multiples). These packs
usually go up to 1M which is about all you're likely to need whole decades
of, though a few 10Ms might be a useful thing to have in the drawer.

As you start using these you'll quickly find there are a few values you run
out of quickly and you can then re-order those in larger quantities. What
you
will need are plenty of extras of the values you use for pullup/down,
(in the region of 1k to 20k depending on application and device). It's worth
getting some SIL or DIL resistor-packs for the same purpose. And don't
forget preset pots, 1k, 10k and 47k should cover most
eventualities.


Capacitors are a bit more tricky to recommend, you need to consider the
composition as well as the values and all this is very dependent on what
type of projects you'll be doing. Here's a few suggestions for a starting
stock based on a quick peek in the "box of bits" I carry for maintenance.
I've kept this minimal, if you've just moved house you'll need all the spare
cash you can find!

You'll need plenty of other capacitors as you go along, but these'll get you
out of trouble:

Small value ceramic caps for use in oscillators etc: 6p, 15p, 22p, 30p.
Polyester caps for decoupling etc: 1n, 10n, 47n, 100n.
Electrolytics: 1u, 4u7, 10u, 47u, 100u, 470u, 1000u. (Because of the huge
tolerances on electrolytics you can get most intermediate values by testing
the ones listed).

Again many suppliers offer packs of different values. Surplus and
educational suppliers are a good place to look as well as the usual major
component companies.

Other useful stuff to stock:

A few op-amps, TL0xx series are a good all-round workhorse.
Voltage regulators, 7805 (or 78L05), 7812 or 15 and  7912 or 15.
Heatsinks.
Max 232 or similar.
DIL sockets for ICs.
LEDs
A few general purpose transistors and FETs.
Crystals and/or resonators. 32kHz, 4MHz and 20MHz are useful.
D-type connectors.
PCB-mount pushbuttons.
PCB-mount screw terminals
A variety of nuts/bolts/washers/other hardware.
Perforated stripboard.
Wire.
And of course: SOME PICs!

Oh yes, get some kind of storage system to keep them all in. I use lots of
those small interlocking drawer units. The ones with clear polystyrene
drawers are to be avoided if at all possible as they are amazingly
breakable. And meltable. And burnable.
Also be sure to fix the drawers securely to your wall or bench - it's a real
pain picking up and re-sorting
all those bits!

When I buy an ICs, transistors etc. I usually get a couple extra to stick in
the drawer, quite a good way to build up a stock of bits for when you need
something in a hurry.

So there's my contribution to a startup kit. There will be loads of stuff
I've missed but others are sure to fill the gaps.


James. Maybe when everyone has made suggestions this could make a Techref
feature for beginners. It's the kind of question most people ask at one time
or another.








.

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2000\08\22@100058 by phutchinson

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If you don't mind sorting them your self, Radio Shack has some very
inexpensive resistor assortments. A good way to practice the color codes and
reading small print :-).

1/4W MF 1% 50pcs, $2.29, #271-309
1/4W CF 5% 100pcs, $2.99 #271-308
1/4W CF 5% 500pcs, $7.99 #271-312
1/2W CF 5% 100pcs, $3.49 #271-306

See the values included in each kit at http://www.radioshack.com/, just type
the part number into the upper left search box.

Paul

=========================================
Paul Hutchinson
Chief Engineer
Maximum Inc., 30 Samuel Barnet Blvd.
New Bedford, MA 02745
phutchinsonspamKILLspamimtra.com
http://www.maximum-inc.com
=========================================

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2000\08\22@140108 by Robert A. LaBudde

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The key to understanding resistor values is to realize they are almost
always used in ratios, so equi-distribution in the logarithm is important.

The "E6" series (1, 1.5, 2.2, 3.3, 4.7, 6.8) correspond to log10 values of
0.00, 0.18, 0.35, 0.52, 0.67, 0.83, which are a reasonably good
approximation to 0/6, 1/6, 2/6, 3/6, 4/6 and 5/6.

The "E12" series adds 1.2, 1.8, 2.7, 3.9, 5.6 and 8.2. In log10 space,
these are 0.08, 0.26, 0.43, 0.59, 0.75 and 0.91, which are reasonable
approximations to the 12-ths.

The "E24" series expands the log10 fractions to 24-ths.

If you want the fewest number of values, use the E6 series. It gives the
best resolution with 6 values.

If you want higher resolution, use the E12 series.

More important than the question of values, is the question of which
decades to stock.

Here are a few rules:

1. For low voltage needs (i.e., < 20 V), 1/4 W resistors are ideal.
2. You will rarely use values below 100r, unless they're high wattage power
types.
3. You need a value to use for LED current limiting and pull-ups. I like
using higher values, such as 2k2 or 4k7 to minimize power. Most modern LEDs
light nicely with 2-3 mA of current, which is what you get with 2k2 @ 5V.
4. You need 1M resistors for some common high-impedance purposes.
5. You need resistors for setting op-amp gains or in voltage dividers. They
should be in ratios of 1:3, 1:10, 1:30 and 1:100. They should not be too
high, and not too low. I like 3k3, 33k and 330k. The 1:3 and 1:30 values
can be achieved by adding 10k and 100k values.
6. Every one seems to love decimal increments (they must count on their
toes!). So 1k, 10k, 100k and 1M are very popular.
7. You need some 47k values for input impedance for microphones, etc.

So, in summary, the following 1/4 W values would seem to be a minimal set:

330r, 1k, 3k3, 10k, 33k, 47k, 100k, 330k, 1M

Use the 330r or 1k for emitter bias.
Use the 1k or 3k3 for LED currents and pull-ups.
Use the 10k or 47k for microphone input impedance matching.
Use the whole set for gain setting and voltage dividers.

If you want to expand the set, start with 470r, 4k7 and 470k.

================================================================
Robert A. LaBudde, PhD, PAS, Dpl. ACAFS  e-mail: .....ralKILLspamspam.....lcfltd.com
Least Cost Formulations, Ltd.            URL: http://lcfltd.com/
824 Timberlake Drive                     Tel: 757-467-0954
Virginia Beach, VA 23464-3239            Fax: 757-467-2947

"Vere scire est per causas scire"
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