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'[OT]: Monitor with patchy coating'
2000\12\08@093511 by Simon Nield

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seems a number of people here know a thing or 2 about monitor screens... wonder if you will be able
to help me with this one:

I have a ctx futura monitor that's about 3 years old. it went back to the manufacturer for repair
under waranty a couple of years ago (psu was dead or something) and when it came back the coating on
the front of the tube (anti-reflection coating?) had become patchy. it has slowly been getting
worse, or i have been getting less tolerant of it... any idea how I can either get the rest of it
off or do something to restore the surface ?

tia,
Simon

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2000\12\08@094100 by Roman Black

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Simon Nield wrote:
>
> seems a number of people here know a thing or 2 about monitor screens... wonder if you will be able
> to help me with this one:
>
> I have a ctx futura monitor that's about 3 years old. it went back to the manufacturer for repair
> under waranty a couple of years ago (psu was dead or something) and when it came back the coating on
> the front of the tube (anti-reflection coating?) had become patchy. it has slowly been getting
> worse, or i have been getting less tolerant of it... any idea how I can either get the rest of it
> off or do something to restore the surface ?


Try metho first, if the alcohol doesn't move it try acetone
(nail polish remover), if that doesn't work I use eucalyptus oil
which moves anything known to man but I don't know if you can
buy that outside of Australia. :o)
-Roman

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2000\12\18@053145 by Simon Nield

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roman:
>Try metho first, if the alcohol doesn't move it try acetone
>(nail polish remover), if that doesn't work I use eucalyptus oil


thanks for the tips roman, nail polish remover seems to be doing the trick now i have managed to get
hold of some... luckily i didn't have to resort to sourcing eucalyptus oil.

regards,
Simon

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2000\12\18@202556 by Gennette, Bruce

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Umh,  you did mean propanone didn't you roman, (or even more correctly
2-propanol) ?  Acetone is a brand/traditional name for the liquid
hydrocarbon that consists of a propane chain (3 carbon atoms linked by
single bonds) with an oxygen atom attached to the second carbon atom in the
chain.  Not to be confused with 1-propanol (or propanal) which has the same
chemical formula but structually has the oxygen attached to the first carbon
atom of the chain.

Let's get it right, after all this list exists on the correctness of the
*EXPERT* advice of the contributers.

And eucalyptus oil is readily available as a cleanser or water softener,
especially for washing woollens.

bye.


> {Original Message removed}

2000\12\20@071034 by Roman Black

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Gennette, Bruce wrote:
>
> Umh,  you did mean propanone didn't you roman, (or even more correctly
> 2-propanol) ?  Acetone is a brand/traditional name for the liquid
> hydrocarbon that consists of a propane chain (3 carbon atoms linked by
> single bonds) with an oxygen atom attached to the second carbon atom in the
> chain.  Not to be confused with 1-propanol (or propanal) which has the same
> chemical formula but structually has the oxygen attached to the first carbon
> atom of the chain.
>
> Let's get it right, after all this list exists on the correctness of the
> *EXPERT* advice of the contributers.


Ouch!! So in your *expert* opinion, what the heck
is in all those little glass bottles I buy that have
"acetone" written as the ingredient? Maybe you should
email them your expert opinion so they can label
their product properly? ;o)


> And eucalyptus oil is readily available as a cleanser or water softener,
> especially for washing woollens.

That's because you're in Australia, mr expert. I was advising
someone in the US where I have heard straight eucalyptus oil
is hard to get. Shame, it's a *mega* organic solvent and smells
great. :o)

Hey, in your expert experience how many TV/monitor screens
have you cleaned?? After 20 years I'm an *expert!* Wanna compare
notes?? :o)
-Roman

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2000\12\20@072317 by Alan B. Pearce

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>That's because you're in Australia, mr expert. I was advising
>someone in the US where I have heard straight eucalyptus oil
>is hard to get. Shame, it's a *mega* organic solvent and smells
>great. :o)

maybe they should buy cold lozenges for the eucalyptus, but its probably hard to
separate it from the menthol.

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2000\12\20@072531 by Bond Peter S-petbond1

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> That's because you're in Australia, mr expert. I was advising
> someone in the US where I have heard straight eucalyptus oil
> is hard to get. Shame, it's a *mega* organic solvent and smells
> great. :o)

Hmm.  How about aromatherapy oils?  Seems a likely candidate (i.e. stinks
enough).  Somewhere around I've got some "lemon oil" (OK, *we* know its
limonene) that gets used for cleaning sticky label residues off things.

Just checked - http://www.fragrant.demon.co.uk/aroma2.html lists eucalyptus.
Since we don't grow a lot of eucalyptus in the UK, perhaps the difficulty of
getting it is similar to the US?

Only caveat is to make sure it is the "essential oil" - otherwise it seems
that it'll be diluted with anything handy.

HTH

Peter

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2000\12\20@073356 by Roman Black

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Bond Peter S-petbond1 wrote:
>
> > That's because you're in Australia, mr expert. I was advising
> > someone in the US where I have heard straight eucalyptus oil
> > is hard to get. Shame, it's a *mega* organic solvent and smells
> > great. :o)
>
> Hmm.  How about aromatherapy oils?  Seems a likely candidate (i.e. stinks
> enough).  Somewhere around I've got some "lemon oil" (OK, *we* know its
> limonene) that gets used for cleaning sticky label residues off things.
>
> Just checked - http://www.fragrant.demon.co.uk/aroma2.html lists eucalyptus.
> Since we don't grow a lot of eucalyptus in the UK, perhaps the difficulty of
> getting it is similar to the US?
>
> Only caveat is to make sure it is the "essential oil" - otherwise it seems
> that it'll be diluted with anything handy.


Probably the alchohol they put in those fragrant oils??

Eucalyptus oil is amazing, organic, non-toxic (ie you can
eat it) but is is fantastic for dissolving adhesives,
specifically sticker residue.

That new organic stuff they get from oranges (peels?)
is amazing too, my friend owns a printery and they use
that now for cleaning printing ink off the rollers. The
solvent they used to use was quite toxic, his hair went
grey at 25 yrs old. Now his factory smells like oranges
when I go in. I just bought some hand cleaner that has
the same safe organic solvent in it (100% natural! on
the label), works great, but still leaves your hands
feeling "funny", must dry out the natural oils in your
skin. I thought it would be good to have a hand cleaner
where you didn't have to wash hands afterwards! But I
suppose it's better than the diesel or kero or whatever
they used to put in.
:o)
-Roman

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2000\12\20@074222 by Bond Peter S-petbond1

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> Probably the alchohol they put in those fragrant oils??

Grapeseed oil is the one I've seen used to dilute it.

> That new organic stuff they get from oranges (peels?)

Yup - limonene.  Extracted the stuff from orange peel in school years back,
and whilst I *can*, it is a lot of effort to go to so I just buy the stuff.

Mind you, I suspect that buying essential oils from places like Body Shop et
al is probably not a cheap way to do it - but I only use small amounts
anyway.  And if you have a cold, eucalyptus & ti tree are kind of effective
for unblocking sinuses too...

Peter

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2000\12\20@075107 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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{Quote hidden}

I find a glass of 16 year old Malt does the trick most times, although I
don't advise snorting it...

Mike

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2000\12\20@075509 by Bond Peter S-petbond1

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> I find a glass of 16 year old Malt does the trick most times,
> although I
> don't advise snorting it...

Savouring the aroma!

The apocryphal Victorian cold cure has its merits, too - hang a hat on the
bedstead.  Drink scotch until you see two hats.  The following morning,
either you have no cold, or alternatively you have too big a hangover to be
concerned about trifling sniffles...

Of course, I couldn't advocate using a decent malt for this.

Peter

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