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'[OT]: Modern Pulse jet enginedevelopment'
2003\01\27@063245 by Russell McMahon

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NZ based man developing a modern pulse jet with some original ideas.
Bruce is a competent engineer and has had substantial success in other areas
of endeavour.
A must see site for anyone with any sort of interest in pulse jets or
amateur built aero engines of any sort.

           http://www.aardvark.co.nz/pjet/

IMHO his attention to personal safety appears inadequate for systems with
this level of danger.
An example engine has 100 pounds thrust in an easily man-portable unit that
looks something like a fattish Bazooka.
He has used it to power a Go-Kart.

___________

Site ref from David L

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2003\01\27@121131 by Robert Ussery

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This guy really gets around!
He posted on the Soaring Usenet group on Google (rec.aviation.soaring),
suggesting that his designs be used to power some of the lighter sailplanes.
Yeah right!

Robert

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2003\01\27@161204 by Peter L. Peres

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On Mon, 27 Jan 2003, Robert Ussery wrote:

*>This guy really gets around!
*>He posted on the Soaring Usenet group on Google (rec.aviation.soaring),
*>suggesting that his designs be used to power some of the lighter sailplanes.
*>Yeah right!

Hey, you could use a V1 engine instead and get more credibility (and
tinnitus). That Hiller trombone device has very low compression ratio so
its efficiency is low. But so has the V1 engine ... there was someone on
this list who said he flew a pulse jet model airplane some time ago, maybe
they want to chip in on this thread.

Peter

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2003\01\27@194359 by Russell McMahon

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> *>This guy really gets around!
> *>He posted on the Soaring Usenet group on Google (rec.aviation.soaring),
> *>suggesting that his designs be used to power some of the lighter
sailplanes.
> *>Yeah right!
>
> Hey, you could use a V1 engine instead and get more credibility (and
> tinnitus). That Hiller trombone device has very low compression ratio so
> its efficiency is low. But so has the V1 engine ... there was someone on
> this list who said he flew a pulse jet model airplane some time ago, maybe
> they want to chip in on this thread.


One working model of Bruce's engine produces about 100 lbf thrust. The V1
produced about 600 lbf. Bruce uses his to power a gokart. Apart from the
terrible noise it would be an entirely practical sailplane motor. The V1
carried a 1 ton payload and travelled at about 400 mph. As air drag rises as
the cube of velocity a V1 size craft might be expected to exceed 200 mph
with Bruce's engine in level flight !!!!!!!! ((600/100)^0.333 ~= 1.8) A
smaller craft would go faster.

A jet or rocket engine of any sort has the interesting attribute of
producing more effective power with increasing speed due to the P = V x F
relationship. (At standstill it delivers no true power at all - only force.
At 200 mph a 100 lbf motor produces about 30,000 ft-lbf/sec or about 60
horsepower. Entirely adequate for a small craft.

Takeoffs would be another matter. The V1 had the same problem and used a
peroxide powered steam catapult to do the honours. In the case of a
sailplane the time honoured alternative is a car with a tow rope. Once
airborne the pulsejet would take it to altitude with ease. A photo shows
Bruce holding the 100 lbf unit and its not overly large on the Go kart. V12
consumed 3.5 lb of fuel per lb thrust per hour. Bruce's is, presumably, more
efficient.



       Russell McMahon

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2003\01\27@201218 by hard Prosser
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Russel
I think that it's the power requirement that goes up with the cube of
velocity. Force goes up with the square ?? Still works out at 163mph
however!

Richard




                   Russell McMahon
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> *>This guy really gets around!
> *>He posted on the Soaring Usenet group on Google (rec.aviation.soaring),
> *>suggesting that his designs be used to power some of the lighter
sailplanes.
> *>Yeah right!
>
> Hey, you could use a V1 engine instead and get more credibility (and
> tinnitus). That Hiller trombone device has very low compression ratio so
> its efficiency is low. But so has the V1 engine ... there was someone on
> this list who said he flew a pulse jet model airplane some time ago,
maybe
> they want to chip in on this thread.


One working model of Bruce's engine produces about 100 lbf thrust. The V1
produced about 600 lbf. Bruce uses his to power a gokart. Apart from the
terrible noise it would be an entirely practical sailplane motor. The V1
carried a 1 ton payload and travelled at about 400 mph. As air drag rises
as
the cube of velocity a V1 size craft might be expected to exceed 200 mph
with Bruce's engine in level flight !!!!!!!! ((600/100)^0.333 ~= 1.8) A
smaller craft would go faster.

A jet or rocket engine of any sort has the interesting attribute of
producing more effective power with increasing speed due to the P = V x F
relationship. (At standstill it delivers no true power at all - only force.
At 200 mph a 100 lbf motor produces about 30,000 ft-lbf/sec or about 60
horsepower. Entirely adequate for a small craft.

Takeoffs would be another matter. The V1 had the same problem and used a
peroxide powered steam catapult to do the honours. In the case of a
sailplane the time honoured alternative is a car with a tow rope. Once
airborne the pulsejet would take it to altitude with ease. A photo shows
Bruce holding the 100 lbf unit and its not overly large on the Go kart. V12
consumed 3.5 lb of fuel per lb thrust per hour. Bruce's is, presumably,
more
efficient.



       Russell McMahon

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2003\01\28@113755 by Benjamin Bromilow

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Russell McMahon" <.....apptechKILLspamspam@spam@PARADISE.NET.NZ>
> terrible noise it would be an entirely practical sailplane motor. The V1

> At 200 mph a 100 lbf motor produces about 30,000 ft-lbf/sec or about 60


A sailplane at 200mph???
Whats the max speed on most sailplanes??
I would have thought most would not enjoy 200mph for very long....

Ben

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2003\01\28@115908 by Robert Ussery

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From: "Benjamin Bromilow" <btbromilowspamKILLspamLINEONE.NET>
> A sailplane at 200mph???
> Whats the max speed on most sailplanes??
> I would have thought most would not enjoy 200mph for very long....

Nope, they wouldn't. Most of them won't do more than 150. With the fairly
negligable thrust produced by a pulsejet standing still, it would be
necessary to launch them with a winch or auto tow. Also, most sailplanes
spend the majority of their time thermalling at speeds from 50-60 mph.
I'm not sure if a sailplane flying at 150 would climb at all, either, both
because best climb speed is usually near 60 mph and because the angle of
attack would be so low at that speed that the sailplane would be dropping
like a rock already and hardly producing any lift. With the pulse jet, it
might be able to maintain altitude, but I doubt it would be able to climb.

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2003\01\28@202447 by Sean H. Breheny

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Hi Robert,

Why are you saying the AOA would be so small? There shouldn't be anything
to stop the pilot from raising the nose and increasing the AOA, as far as I
see it.

Do sailplanes have a "best climb" speed? I thought that was for powered
airplanes only, as a compromise between engine power, lift, and drag.
AFAIK, a sailplane cannot perform a sustained climb relative to the air
around it, so technically there is no such thing as a sustained climb for a
sailplane. A thermal just means that the air around the sailplane is rising
faster than the sailplane is falling in it.

Sean

At 09:57 AM 1/28/2003 -0700, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2003\01\29@011649 by Robert Ussery

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From: "Sean H. Breheny" <EraseMEshb7spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTCORNELL.EDU>
> Why are you saying the AOA would be so small? There shouldn't be anything
> to stop the pilot from raising the nose and increasing the AOA, as far as
I
> see it.

AOA is directly related to airspeed for a given AOA, the glider will fly at
a given airspeed. This is a property of the airfoil used and cannot be
changed (except for w/ flaps and other devices that adjust the shape of the
wing). If the pilot raises the nose, he will increase the AOA and slow down.
This is all dependant on the power to weight ratio of the aircraft in
question, of course. Aircraft with lots of power may maintain a given AOA at
a high pitch angle. For sailplanes, however, a given AOA (and pitch angle -
without power, they're equivalent) will result in a given airspeed.

> Do sailplanes have a "best climb" speed? I thought that was for powered
> airplanes only, as a compromise between engine power, lift, and drag.
> AFAIK, a sailplane cannot perform a sustained climb relative to the air
> around it, so technically there is no such thing as a sustained climb for
a
> sailplane. A thermal just means that the air around the sailplane is
rising
> faster than the sailplane is falling in it.

There are two "performance" speeds in gliders. You have the minimum sink
speed (usually 5 or so knots above stall) which the glider uses to stay in
the air for the longest period with a given altitude. This is equivalent to
maximum climb angle in a power plane (Vx, I think).
The second speed is best L/D speed, the speed at which the lift to drag
ratio is greatest. At this speed, the glider will travel the greatest
distance over the ground for a given altitude loss. This is equivalent to
best rate of climb in a power plane (Vy?).
Minimum sink is used for thermalling because it permits a tighter circle in
the thermal. Best L/D is used between thermals or on long cross-country
runs.
Your definition of a thermal is correct, in that a positive rate of climb
relative to the surrounding air is impossible. However, minimum sink speed
results in the least altitude lost per unit of time in the thermal and
thereby permits more efficient use of the rising surrounding air mass. The
lower the glider's sink rate, obviously, the higher the rate of climb in a
thermal, when compared to a glider with a higher sink rate.

- Robert

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'[OT]: Modern Pulse jet enginedevelopment'
2003\06\04@091559 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff
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Russell,

FYI - Bruce Simpson got a couple of minutes on the evening news here in
Aus tonight.

They had some better footage of that Go-Kart run. That flame was
certainly not far from the bottle of propane!!!

Cheers,

Sean

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