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'[OT]: Meanings of cracker...'
2002\11\01@200513 by Bob Ammerman

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One who breaks in...

ie: safe cracker

or: network cracker

etc.


"Crackers" means crazy.

Bob Ammerman

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2002\11\01@201102 by cdb

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Also an excellent TV series starring Robbie Coltrane

and we won't go down the boarding school Sao path

colin
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2002\11\01@201111 by Sid Weaver

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In a message dated 11/01/2002 20:05:42 Eastern Standard Time,
.....rammermanKILLspamspam.....ADELPHIA.NET writes:


>
> "Crackers" means crazy.
>
> Bob Ammerman
>
>

Are you referring to PICer cracker?

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2002\11\01@202149 by William Chops Westfield

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A bristish "Cracker" is a pyrotechnic novelty device. A small
friction-initiated explosive device inside a thing that looks like a big
paper taffy.  You pull on the two ends, set off the explosive (which is
usually pitifully weak (fortunately, since the things are pretty much
designed such that it goes off right in front of your face)), and it bursts
open (more as a result of the pulling than of the "explosion".)  There is
usually a small toy and a silly hat inside.  See:
http://www.absolutelycrackers.com/

Interestingly, there IS no american word for the same thing, because
americans (except for anglophiles) just don't DO "crackers" - the closes
equivilent is probably the "grab bag" WRT the prize, or the "champagne
popper" from the pyrotechnic perspective.

(The Germans have "Kinder eggs", which seem to be similarly local...)

BillW

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2002\11\01@203008 by cdb

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You forgot the pathetic joke that is inside.

But the toy whistles are fun esp when great Aunt Martha swallows it
by mistake and drifts off in a Advocaat ridden stupor.
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2002\11\01@214447 by Jim Korman

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William Chops Westfield wrote:

{Quote hidden}

From your description, we've always called those crackers. Sometimes
just the noise,
sometimes streamers or somesuch inside.

Jim (Here in the USA, grew up in Virginia)

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2002\11\02@111450 by Alan B. Pearce

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>(The Germans have "Kinder eggs", which seem to be similarly local...)

Do you not have "Kinder Surprise" on sale in the US? Small chocolate eggs
wrapped in foil, about the same size as a small hen's egg. Inside the Kinder
Surprise is a small toy, occasionally fully built up, but generally a clip
together kitset of half a dozen bits.

Kinder is German for "Child", and in New Zealand, what Americans call
"Nursery School" is known as "Kindergarten", as in "children's garden". Not
sure how wide spread this term is though, through the rest of the world.

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2002\11\02@123243 by Dale Botkin

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On Sat, 2 Nov 2002, Alan B. Pearce wrote:

> >(The Germans have "Kinder eggs", which seem to be similarly local...)
>
> Do you not have "Kinder Surprise" on sale in the US? Small chocolate eggs
> wrapped in foil, about the same size as a small hen's egg. Inside the Kinder
> Surprise is a small toy, occasionally fully built up, but generally a clip
> together kitset of half a dozen bits.

We might have had such things, but I'm sure the Consumer Products Safety
Commission has eradicated them due to the risk of some little rugrat
swallowing the toy.

> Kinder is German for "Child", and in New Zealand, what Americans call
> "Nursery School" is known as "Kindergarten", as in "children's garden". Not
> sure how wide spread this term is though, through the rest of the world.

We never call it nursery school.  We have kindergarten.  Before that is
preschool for the really little ones, but none of mine had that
experience.

And next time I get a party favor, I want it Aussie-style!!!! 8-)

Dale

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2002\11\02@124108 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Dale Botkin wrote:
> We never call it nursery school.  We have kindergarten.  Before that
> is preschool for the really little ones, but none of mine had that
> experience.

we have "kindergarden", and talking around with "natives", they translate
the word as a place for toddlers care, but the feeling is like "a garden
where people is kind (to the young)", and not necessarily "kinder" as
"children".

W46NER

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2002\11\02@162728 by William Chops Westfield

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   Do you not have "Kinder Surprise" on sale in the US? Small chocolate
   eggs wrapped in foil, about the same size as a small hen's egg. Inside
   the Kinder Surprise is a small toy

No.  At least, certainly not as a traditional thing.


   Kinder is German for "Child", and in New Zealand, what Americans call
   "Nursery School" is known as "Kindergarten", as in "children's garden".

Hmm.  What do you call "Kindergarten" then?  (In the US, Kindergarten is
the pre-1st grade school for 5-year olds; usually half-days.  The earliest
instance of public education.  "Pre-school" is usually the "kindergarten
prep" for 4-year olds, but can be anything with a slightly more accademic
leaning than "day-care."  I haven't heard "nursery school" in a long time.")

BillW

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2002\11\02@183022 by mark

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   Kinder is German for "Child", and in New Zealand, what Americans call
   "Nursery School" is known as "Kindergarten", as in "children's garden".

   Hmm.  What do you call "Kindergarten" then?  (In the US, Kindergarten is
   the pre-1st grade school for 5-year olds; usually half-days.  The
earliest
   instance of public education.  "Pre-school" is usually the "kindergarten
   prep" for 4-year olds, but can be anything with a slightly more
accademic
   leaning than "day-care."  I haven't heard "nursery school" in a long
time.")


I think you'll find that it's the UK that still use the term 'Nursery
School' most widely.  We have Nursery School (about 3-5yrs, but not
compulsory), followed by Infants' School (5-7) and Middle School (8-11),
although the latter two are sometimes combined.  Secondary School (from age
11) is where the serious work starts, with GCSE exams at 16 yrs.  While most
secondary schools incorporate a sixth form for study of A-Levels from 17-18
a few students prefer to go to a separate sixth form college before
departing for University at 18 years of age.

To confuse matters further we also have kindergartens and pre-schools, prep
schools and colleges of further and higher education, but they generally all
occupy the same sort of boundaries as the above.  Not sure if that is of any
particular use to anyone, but there you go!

Kind Regards,
Mark Brown

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2002\11\02@200150 by cdb

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Alan,

As your in the UK, Kindergarten was used  - well it was whenI  went
to school, I understand some have wandered over to the American way
of school years.

It is also used in Norway.

Colin
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