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'[OT]: Maxim - what a guys'
2002\11\09@043600 by Jinx

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> > If you're just looking to prototype, have you tried Maxim samples?
> > They are usually pretty quick, even to here in Canada.
>
> possible...  couple of weeks later here they are, DIP and all, shipped
> from Malaysia.  Awesome folks.
>
> Dale

Aye, they are that. I get a monthly Maxim newsletter (which I didn't
ask for btw so the beligerent could say it's spam !!). Not posted from
the NZ agent 2 miles up the road. Couriered from Preston in the UK.
Must cost them a bob or two

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2002\11\09@044634 by Katinka Mills

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Yeap, and they are jam packed with heaps of info, (my payment for reading
their "spam" is I order a few samples from each issue :o)

I think I have close to us$5K in engineering samples, some of which never
made it into production (damn DALSEMI)

Regards,

Kat.

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2002\11\09@045051 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff

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> Aye, they are that. I get a monthly Maxim newsletter (which I didn't
> ask for btw so the beligerent could say it's spam !!). Not posted from
> the NZ agent 2 miles up the road. Couriered from Preston in the UK.
> Must cost them a bob or two

Nah, they just don't just trust the Kiwi postal service! :-)

Sean

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2002\11\09@052346 by Russell McMahon

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> > Aye, they are that. I get a monthly Maxim newsletter (which I didn't
> > ask for btw so the beligerent could say it's spam !!). Not posted from
> > the NZ agent 2 miles up the road. Couriered from Preston in the UK.
> > Must cost them a bob or two
>
> Nah, they just don't just trust the Kiwi postal service! :-)


Mail delivery times are an inverse function of distance involved.


       RM

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2002\11\09@053411 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sat, 9 Nov 2002, Russell McMahon wrote:

*>Mail delivery times are an inverse function of distance involved.

On which planet ? Surely not on this one.

Peter

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2002\11\09@060455 by Russell McMahon

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> *>Mail delivery times are an inverse function of distance involved.
>
> On which planet ? Surely not on this one.

That was, of course, meant in jest BUT it sometimes seems to work
(surprisingly).
This was the theme of a SciFi story I read once (possibly Asimov?) where it
was ultimately found that over intergalactic distances mail would arrive
before it had been sent. Relativity of course makes that hard to quantify
exactly.

My best experience of a local mail system working well occurred just after I
left university in a city 70 miles south of Auckland, the university city. I
arrived at work one morning and dropped a letter to an Auckland bank in my
out tray. The letter required a minor decision by the bank's manager).  On
arriving at work next morning I found a typed reply from the bank. This
required the original to be cleared to local mail, sent 70 miles, delivered
in Auckland, read and replied to by bank, typed at bank, posted and cleared
locally, delivered 70 miles, delivered locally to my tray. Not a bad result
for a 24 hour time frame.



       RM

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2002\11\09@100018 by cdb

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You forgot about the time continuum difference involving the chord
dissected by the radii of the earths surface.

I get some magazines from the Us and UK that are posted by a Dutch
postal company

Colin
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2002\11\09@102539 by Russell McMahon

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> You forgot about the time continuum difference involving the chord
> dissected by the radii of the earths surface.

FWIW - the transit time through a frictionless straight tunnel using only
gravity as the motive force is constant regardless of source and
destination. A figure of 90 minutes comes to mind but may well be wrong.

As tunnels get longer gravity component gets larger so speed increases.
eg Tunnels from London to Lands End, or Birmingham to Belfast or Peking to
Prague all have the same transit times.

May get rather hot at mid point on some longer routes.


       RM

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2002\11\10@125421 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sun, 10 Nov 2002, cdb wrote:

*>You forgot about the time continuum difference involving the chord
*>dissected by the radii of the earths surface.
*>
*>I get some magazines from the Us and UK that are posted by a Dutch
*>postal company

The time depends on the number of mailhops, not on distance. Also there is
the fate factor.

Peter

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2002\11\10@125422 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sun, 10 Nov 2002, Russell McMahon wrote:

*>> *>Mail delivery times are an inverse function of distance involved.
*>>
*>> On which planet ? Surely not on this one.
*>
*>That was, of course, meant in jest BUT it sometimes seems to work
*>(surprisingly).

In my experience mail on this planet either does not arrive at all or
takes a time computed as T = mailhops * k1 + k2 where k2 is a large random
number. This mostly applies to snail mail (non airmail). have seen 3+
months for a plain letter between Canada and here, more than once. It
would have gotten here faster by sailing ship I think.

Peter

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2002\11\10@234656 by Russell McMahon

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If you want to watch the progress of a parcel across the world you can do it
with Fedex (admittedly not quite mail). Their internet tracking system is
(near) realtime by email query and gives fantastic detail. I once followed
an order step by step from Digikey to NZ "just for fun" (I think perhaps the
trace detail dies after delivery so mayhaps real time is the only way to do
this). Took about 3 or 4 hops before it reached a regional centre. Got a bit
boring once it was in the 'plane.

Only semi related - I once sent a temperature logger from here to Taiwan and
thence to Europe and back to NZ. The Taiwan-Europe leg was the one we wished
to record. On arriving in NZ (still going) on a Friday they placed it in a
freezer at substantially below freezing for 24 hours. I subsequently asked
them why they had done so. They swore they hadn't and when I told them I
could see that they had they said they had no idea why. Wonder if this is
standard treatment for inbound weekend parcels ? :-)


       RM

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2002\11\10@235320 by cdb

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Could that have been the temperature in the hold of the plane?
Perhaps it's a reverse pasterisation process; chill the little
nasties to death.

Colin

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2002\11\11@001715 by Russell McMahon

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part 1 629 bytes content-type:text/plain; (decoded 7bit)

> Could that have been the temperature in the hold of the plane?
> Perhaps it's a reverse pasterisation process; chill the little
> nasties to death.

No. The plane trip was well enough followed on  the temperature logger. The
low temperature period matched when they had it in local customs. The trace
of the ship journey from Taiwan to Europe as containerised deck cargo was
interesting.Daily changes and journey trend was easily seen. Most extreme
variations were in Europe during unloading and delivery.

Graph attached.
You can clearly see the deep & brief dip near the end.


part 2 8372 bytes content-type:image/gif; (decode)


part 3 136 bytes
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2002\11\11@002715 by Russell McMahon

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part 1 630 bytes content-type:text/plain; (decoded 7bit)

> Could that have been the temperature in the hold of the plane?
> Perhaps it's a reverse pasterisation process; chill the little
> nasties to death.

No. The plane trip was well enough followed on  the temperature logger. The
low temperature period matched when they had it in local customs. The trace
of the ship journey from Taiwan to Europe as containerised deck cargo was
interesting.Daily changes and journey trend was easily seen. Most extreme
variations were in Europe during unloading and delivery.

Graph attached.
You can clearly see the deep & brief dip near the end.



part 2 8372 bytes content-type:image/gif; (decode)


part 3 136 bytes
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2002\11\11@004227 by Nate Duehr

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On Sun, 2002-11-10 at 21:45, Russell McMahon wrote:

> Only semi related - I once sent a temperature logger from here to Taiwan and
> thence to Europe and back to NZ. The Taiwan-Europe leg was the one we wished
> to record. On arriving in NZ (still going) on a Friday they placed it in a
> freezer at substantially below freezing for 24 hours. I subsequently asked
> them why they had done so. They swore they hadn't and when I told them I
> could see that they had they said they had no idea why. Wonder if this is
> standard treatment for inbound weekend parcels ? :-)

Was it truly put in a freezer or just an unheated section of a cargo
aircraft?  Or a particularly cold area of a cargo aircraft?

Way back when, when I worked for an airline while I was going to school,
there were cargo bins (even on fully-pressurized passenger aircraft)
that were suitable for pets and those that were not.  And crawling into
the back bin on aircraft like that to unload hundreds of pounds of
baggage on a hot summer day was a blessing in disguise, even if there's
no room in them to properly pick up and move, said baggage.  (GRIN)

Nate

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2002\11\11@004426 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff

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Russell,

> Only semi related - I once sent a temperature logger from here to
> Taiwan and
> thence to Europe and back to NZ. The Taiwan-Europe leg was the one we
> wished
> to record. On arriving in NZ (still going) on a Friday they placed it
> in a
> freezer at substantially below freezing for 24 hours. I subsequently
> asked
> them why they had done so. They swore they hadn't and when I told them
> I
> could see that they had they said they had no idea why. Wonder if this
> is
> standard treatment for inbound weekend parcels ? :-)

You must have too much time on your hands! :-)

Sean

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2002\11\11@004635 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff

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> No. The plane trip was well enough followed on  the temperature
> logger. The
> low temperature period matched when they had it in local customs. The
> trace
> of the ship journey from Taiwan to Europe as containerised deck cargo
> was
> interesting.Daily changes and journey trend was easily seen. Most
> extreme
> variations were in Europe during unloading and delivery.
>
> Graph attached.
> You can clearly see the deep & brief dip near the end.

What time of year? Ever stood around on a tarmac in the middle of
Winter in Europe?

Sean

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2002\11\11@005252 by Nate Duehr

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Disregard, just saw the graph.  Interesting.  (GRIN)

On Sun, 2002-11-10 at 22:42, Nate Duehr wrote:

> Was it truly put in a freezer or just an unheated section of a cargo
> aircraft?  Or a particularly cold area of a cargo aircraft?

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2002\11\11@030654 by Russell McMahon

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Nate said

> > Was it truly put in a freezer or just an unheated section of a cargo
> > aircraft?  Or a particularly cold area of a cargo aircraft?

&

> Disregard, just saw the graph.  Interesting.  (GRIN)

As you can see from the graph, the date was about January 5th this year.
Being in the southern hemisphere here, that is mid summer here. Typical
temperatures here at that time are, as you can see from the graph, 15 to 25
degrees C. In winter we occasionally get frost and perhaps a light dusting
of snow once every 100 years or so.

Even if you assumed unseasonably bad conditions the sudden drop to about -4
degrees C and back again over about 12 hours suggests something gang aglae.
The slightly slower but equally large dips and peaks toward the end of
November are accounted for by a European winter.

Re Sean's comments about too much time on my hands - I don't always use my
far too limited time (only 168 hours per week) as wisely as I might but on
this occasion it was a paying job and I needed to be sure that the
temperature logger was working properly. Everything else indicated that it
was and the sudden dip remains unexplained. Given that there are freezers
avail;able for storage at the airport and that the parcel was stored there
over a weekend I am highly confident that I know where my parcel spent part
of its weekend :-)


       Russell McMahon

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2002\11\11@062725 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I get some magazines from the Us and UK that are
>posted by a Dutch postal company

Some large organisations seem to courier batches of mail to foreign
countries, which is then posted on the (relatively) local posatal network.
It seems that this is cheaper than posting from the point of origin, when
you have lots of mail going to an area.

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2002\11\11@142257 by Peter L. Peres

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part 1 252 bytes content-type:TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
On Mon, 11 Nov 2002, Russell McMahon wrote:

*>You can clearly see the deep & brief dip near the end.

Maybe it's to kill live seeds and bacteria ? Most live seeds would have
trouble with that cold dip. Also some operating electronics.

Peter


part 2 8372 bytes content-type:IMAGE/GIF; NAME="tlog1.gif" (decode)

part 3 136 bytes
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2002\11\11@222025 by Bill & Pookie

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I find it is easier to check tracking to see if
they have delivered it to door.  Saves trips to
front door.

Bill

{Original Message removed}

2002\11\11@222859 by Bill & Pookie

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Are there rules about electronic stuff running on
planes?

Bill

----- Original Message -----
From: "Russell McMahon" <EraseMEapptechspamPARADISE.NET.NZ>
To: <RemoveMEPICLISTEraseMEspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Sunday, November 10, 2002 8:45 PM
Subject: Re: [OT]: Maxim - what a guys

snip...

> Only semi related - I once sent a temperature
logger from here to Taiwan and
> thence to Europe and back to NZ.

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2002\11\12@003353 by Roman Black

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> On Mon, 11 Nov 2002, Russell McMahon wrote:
>
> *>You can clearly see the deep & brief dip near the end.
>
> Maybe it's to kill live seeds and bacteria ? Most live seeds would have
> trouble with that cold dip. Also some operating electronics.


Everyone seems to be assuming the temperature
logging went without fault.

Assuming the sharp dip in question is a deliberate
"process", presumably to kill bacteria etc it
is very likely that this process was not refrigeration
but some irradiation which simply caused a malfunction
in the electronics or temp sensing, which one might
expect with a severe irradiating?
-Roman

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2002\11\12@054413 by Russell McMahon

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> Are there rules about electronic stuff running on
> planes?


Yes, although I believe they are largely defacto and usually are concerned
with high energy devices or purposeful RF radiators. Use of eg laptops is
standard and thees can have significamnt em output.

Temperature loggers travel the world regularly. A common feature is their
very low battery drain and attendant very low em radiation (some lower than
others). My device runs for over 5 years on a single large flat 3V Lithium
cell.
It draws under 1 uA sleeping wnd is woken up by the RTC chip when readings
are to be made when it draws not much still :-). I suspect it would have
less radiation output than some wristwatches, PDAs or pocket calculators.


       RM

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