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'[OT]: LINUX'
2005\07\15@034046 by Luis.Moreira

picon face

Hi Guys
I am just starting with Linux and I do not now very well what I am
doing...
So with that in mind I am trying to change over, as many people in this
list suggested, very slowly. I am running Fedora core 3 and I tried to
setup my email by giving it the incoming and outgoing servers. In my
case they are spam_OUTPOP3TakeThisOuTspamblueyonder.co.uk and .....SMTPKILLspamspam@spam@blueyonder.co.uk .
The program can send messages but it can not connect with the POP3
server, giving me a message saying it can not find server ( can not
resolve). I can not understand this because outlook as exactly the same
settings and it works fine.
Any thoughts?
Best regards
               Luis


2005\07\15@040004 by Dave Wheeler

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face
Luis,

I would guess they are both wrong......

Should be pop3.blueyonder.co.uk (note the . instaed of a @)

Dave


Luis Moreira wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2005\07\15@041844 by Neil Thompson

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On Fri, Jul 15, 2005 at 08:40:42AM +0100, Luis Moreira wrote:
>
> setup my email by giving it the incoming and outgoing servers. In my
> case they are EraseMEPOP3spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTblueyonder.co.uk and SMTPspamspam_OUTblueyonder.co.uk .

I think you'll find that the server names are pop3.blueyonder.co.uk and
smtp.blueyonder.co.uk respectively (i.e. lose the @ sign).  Just make sure
that you can resolve the names on your machine by opening a terminal session
and using the "dig" command (e.g. dig pop3.blueyonder.co.uk).  If there are errors
resolving the names, you won't be able to connect to them.
                                                                                                                                           
Also, make sure that you can get through to the servers, by firstly pinging them, and
then by trying to telnet to them on the pop3 and smtp ports.

--
Cheers! (Relax...have a homebrew)

Neil

THEOREM: VI is perfect.
PROOF: VI in roman numerals is 6.  The natural numbers < 6 which divide 6 are
1, 2, and 3. 1+2+3 = 6.  So 6 is a perfect number.  Therefore, VI is perfect.
QED
                                                   -- Arthur Tateishi

2005\07\15@050347 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi Dave/Neil,
That should do it...my mistake, and there's me cursing Linux.
This is going to be Fun...
Thank you both for the help, is the little things that always get in the
way of the big ones.
Best regards
               Luis

Luis Moreira
@spam@luis.moreiraKILLspamspamjet.uk
tel. 01235464615
JET PSU Department
UKAEA Culham Division
J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
Oxfordshire
OX14 3DB


{Original Message removed}

2005\07\15@050413 by Jose Da Silva

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face
On July 15, 2005 12:40 am, Luis Moreira wrote:
> Hi Guys
> I am just starting with Linux and I do not now very well what I am
> doing...
> So with that in mind I am trying to change over, as many people in
> this list suggested, very slowly. I am running Fedora core 3 and I
> tried to setup my email by giving it the incoming and outgoing
> servers. In my case they are KILLspamPOP3KILLspamspamblueyonder.co.uk and
> RemoveMESMTPTakeThisOuTspamblueyonder.co.uk . The program can send messages but it can not
> connect with the POP3 server, giving me a message saying it can not
> find server ( can not resolve). I can not understand this because
> outlook as exactly the same settings and it works fine.
> Any thoughts?
> Best regards
>                Luis

Others on the list already pointed out the @

This may also help you as well.

I sent in these screen-shots for when I had Mandrake 8.0, so the KMail
references may look a little "old" compared to what you have now.
http://www.ehosting.ca/customerService/tutorials/KDEmail/KDEmail.php

This points to both Thunderbird and Kmail depending on which you use.
http://www.ehosting.ca/customerService/tutorials.php

You may also want to take a note of the PORT numbers (25 & 110) if your
ISP is not the same location as your email provider. Some ISPs block
the normal email port numbers to kill most of those viruses SPAMing
garbage.
External mail providers may have alternate port numbers (instead of 25
or 110) for normal mail or for encrypted SSL-type mail.

2005\07\15@073929 by Luis.Moreira

picon face

Thanks Jose
The links are very useful.
I also need to find a program to send and receive data using the serial
port like a console. In windows I am using HiperTerminal but in Linux
which program shall I use? Is it Telnet?
Best regards
               Luis


{Original Message removed}

2005\07\15@091650 by Byron A Jeff

face picon face
On Fri, Jul 15, 2005 at 12:39:22PM +0100, Luis Moreira wrote:
>
> Thanks Jose
> The links are very useful.
> I also need to find a program to send and receive data using the serial
> port like a console. In windows I am using HiperTerminal but in Linux
> which program shall I use? Is it Telnet?

minicom.

BAJ

2005\07\15@093316 by Herbert Graf

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On Fri, 2005-07-15 at 12:39 +0100, Luis Moreira wrote:
> Thanks Jose
> The links are very useful.
> I also need to find a program to send and receive data using the serial
> port like a console. In windows I am using HiperTerminal but in Linux
> which program shall I use? Is it Telnet?
> Best regards
>                Luis

FC3 has minicom, give that one a wirl. It's text based (no GUI) but
works wonderfully.

Congrats on starting the transition. I spent years considering the
transition. Dual booting worked, but was too inconvenient and time
consuming. Then Dell had one of their $300 PCs with free shipping, add a
KVM and that's the machine I'm currently typing on. I power up my
windows machine when I need something specific but that's getting rarer
and rarer. It's been about a week since I booted that machine...

With Linux the support community is the internet. Every issue I've had
with Linux was resolved by searching on google. If you get an error
message try copying that message into google, more often then not
someone else has gotten that exact same error and posted a solution!

The only thing that still bugs me about some Linux distros is upgrading.
For some reason Redhat/Fedora has never been good on the "upgrade"
front. It's gotten much better, but still isn't perfect.

For example, I upgraded my machine from FC3 to FC4. Everything works
fine, except up2date still thinks it's FC3 (anyone know what to change
to get up2date to know it's running on FC4?) and 'yum update' doesn't
work!!??! Latest message is that a package it wants to install conflicts
with one installed, yet neither are recognized by yum on their own, very
frustrating. Looks like I'll have to wipe this machine and install FC4
fresh, oh well...

TTYL

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2005\07\15@094840 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi Byron/Herbert,
Minicom seems to be the one, I just need to work out how to configure
it... :)
I have a separate machine for each system and I am in the process of
buying a KVM switch, as changing the monitor from one machine to the
other is a pain. Working with Windows left me almost unable to stand the
text based stuff but I am finally starting to kick the habit and is
funny that many other things become a bit clearer... but is hard going.
Thanks for all the help
Best regards
               Luis



Luis Moreira
spamBeGoneluis.moreiraspamBeGonespamjet.uk
tel. 01235464615
JET PSU Department
UKAEA Culham Division
J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
Oxfordshire
OX14 3DB


{Original Message removed}

2005\07\15@100947 by Ian Smith-Heisters

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Have you found that GPASM is a tenable replacement for the Microchip
toolset? The only thing I've been booting to windows for recently is
MPASM. I heard rumors about an open source C for the 18F series, any
word on that? I used JAL for a while, but found its support a little
iffy for the 18F (no offense, Wouter), though it's probably gotten
better since then.

Cheers,
Ian

Herbert Graf wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2005\07\15@102813 by Peter Onion

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On Fri, 2005-07-15 at 10:09 -0400, Ian Smith-Heisters wrote:
> Have you found that GPASM is a tenable replacement for the Microchip
> toolset?

Yes.

> The only thing I've been booting to windows for recently is
> MPASM. I heard rumors about an open source C for the 18F series, any
> word on that?

SDCC is being talked about enthusiastically over on the gputils list at
the moment.  I've not tried it myself but I will be doing so shortly
(once I've got my 18F programmer working).

>  I used JAL for a while, but found its support a little
> iffy for the 18F (no offense, Wouter), though it's probably gotten
> better since then.  

I tried it a couple of months ago.  I didn't like it. YMMV.

Peter

2005\07\15@114151 by Shawn Tan Ser Ngiap

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> SDCC is being talked about enthusiastically over on the gputils list at
> the moment.  I've not tried it myself but I will be doing so shortly
> (once I've got my 18F programmer working).

I tried SDCC a couple of months ago.. I don't have a 18F, so i just compiled
some simple code and disassembled the output to check... the code looked okay
at first glance...

cheers..

--
with metta,
Shawn Tan

2005\07\15@120250 by Michael Dipperstein

face
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> From: TakeThisOuTpiclist-bouncesEraseMEspamspam_OUTmit.edu [RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu] On
Behalf
> Of Herbert Graf
> Sent: Friday, July 15, 2005 6:33 AM

...

> For example, I upgraded my machine from FC3 to FC4. Everything works
> fine, except up2date still thinks it's FC3 (anyone know what to change
> to get up2date to know it's running on FC4?) and 'yum update' doesn't
> work!!??!

I had similar problems with yum thinking that it was updating FC3 on an
FC4 machine.  I think the solution was to delete /etc/yum.conf.  The
problem happened on my home PC and I'm not at home, so I'm relying on my
ever fading memory.

FC4 puts all it's configuration in a subdirectory of /etc, but yum kept
using the old yum.conf and not getting basename right too.  I've been
using yum since RH9, and it seems they do something every Fedora release
to cause me pains with yum.

> Latest message is that a package it wants to install conflicts
> with one installed, yet neither are recognized by yum on their own,
very
> frustrating. Looks like I'll have to wipe this machine and install FC4
> fresh, oh well...

Have you tried uninstalling the conflicting package before you use yum?
I had a problem with XFCE installs because I installed non-Fedora RPMs
before XFCE was included in Fedora.  Then Fedora included XFCE, but
packaged it differently and I kept getting errors about packages
conflicting.

-Mike

2005\07\15@163953 by John Meacham

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On Fri, Jul 15, 2005 at 09:33:14AM -0400, Herbert Graf wrote:
> Congrats on starting the transition. I spent years considering the
> transition. Dual booting worked, but was too inconvenient and time
> consuming. Then Dell had one of their $300 PCs with free shipping, add a
> KVM and that's the machine I'm currently typing on. I power up my
> windows machine when I need something specific but that's getting rarer
> and rarer. It's been about a week since I booted that machine...

No need for a KVM if you have a network on both machines. You can use
vnc or rdesktop to get access to your windows desktop from linux, or a better solution
is
http://synergy2.sourceforge.net/

It lets you treat your linux and windows machine as if they were one,
drag your mouse off one screen and it appears on the other. cut-n-paste
even works seamlessly between the two systems. If you share filesystems
too then it is really like working on a single machine that is both
linux and windows.
It is nicer than vnc because even graphics intensive or 3d (games,
modellers) apps work just fine since you are using the native graphics
hardware.

       John

-- John Meacham - &#9286;repetae.net&#9286;john&#9288

2005\07\15@164915 by Josh Koffman

face picon face
On 7/15/05, John Meacham <johnEraseMEspam.....repetae.net> wrote:
> http://synergy2.sourceforge.net/
>
> It lets you treat your linux and windows machine as if they were one,
> drag your mouse off one screen and it appears on the other. cut-n-paste
> even works seamlessly between the two systems. If you share filesystems
> too then it is really like working on a single machine that is both
> linux and windows.

Let me also add my support for Synergy. It's really an amazing piece
of software. My one is that occasionally when I close one of the
clients, I have to restart the machine before it'll connect to the
server again. I have no idea why...I'll figure it out someday I'm
sure. The cut and paste between machines is utterly amazing.

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
       -Douglas Adams

2005\07\15@165734 by PicDude

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face
Hmmm... sounds like a nice piece of software.  I'll have to play with that.

Speaking of amazing pieces of software, have you considered "vmware" -- it's a
virtual computer that you install on Linux (or Windows if you have that
version), then you install an OS on top of that, such as Windows.  On my
500Mhz laptop with Redhat 7, I installed Win2k on the VM.  Speed was awesome,
and we noted it felt pretty much the same as Win2k installed directly on the
laptop.

Cheers,
-Neil.




On Friday 15 July 2005 03:49 pm, Josh Koffman scribbled:
{Quote hidden}

2005\07\15@195606 by Herbert Graf

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face
On Fri, 2005-07-15 at 13:39 -0700, John Meacham wrote:
> On Fri, Jul 15, 2005 at 09:33:14AM -0400, Herbert Graf wrote:
> > Congrats on starting the transition. I spent years considering the
> > transition. Dual booting worked, but was too inconvenient and time
> > consuming. Then Dell had one of their $300 PCs with free shipping, add a
> > KVM and that's the machine I'm currently typing on. I power up my
> > windows machine when I need something specific but that's getting rarer
> > and rarer. It's been about a week since I booted that machine...
>
> No need for a KVM if you have a network on both machines. You can use
> vnc or rdesktop to get access to your windows desktop from linux,

I extensively use VNC, and both machines have VNC, however VNC is no
substitute for a KVM IMHO. A KVM like the one I have allows you to
switch machines by tapping scroll lock twice, much quicker then even
VNC. Aside from that you avoid the issues of doing multimedia stuff on
both machines.

{Quote hidden}

Unfortunately, and correct me if I'm wrong, but that requires two
monitors. I barely have room for one monitor on my desk, never mind two.

TTYL

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2005\07\15@203704 by Herbert Graf

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On Fri, 2005-07-15 at 09:01 -0700, Michael Dipperstein wrote:
> I had similar problems with yum thinking that it was updating FC3 on an
> FC4 machine.  I think the solution was to delete /etc/yum.conf.  The
> problem happened on my home PC and I'm not at home, so I'm relying on my
> ever fading memory.

That just results in yum coming up with:

Config Error: Error accessing file for config file:///etc/yum.conf

I've also tried some other yum.confs I found on the net, no improvement.
How do I get up2date to use a different "channel"?

> Have you tried uninstalling the conflicting package before you use yum?
> I had a problem with XFCE installs because I installed non-Fedora RPMs
> before XFCE was included in Fedora.  Then Fedora included XFCE, but
> packaged it differently and I kept getting errors about packages
> conflicting.

Well that's the interesting bit, yum doesn't recognize the package, I
can't seem to figure out how to nuke it with rpm (rpm keeps saying not
installed) and I certainly didn't install it!? Oh well, other stuff to
do...

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2005\07\15@203813 by Hector Martin

flavicon
face
Ian Smith-Heisters wrote:
> Have you found that GPASM is a tenable replacement for the Microchip
> toolset? The only thing I've been booting to windows for recently is
> MPASM. I heard rumors about an open source C for the 18F series, any
> word on that? I used JAL for a while, but found its support a little
> iffy for the 18F (no offense, Wouter), though it's probably gotten
> better since then.

I use GPUTILS (GPASM,GPLINK, etc) for all my PIC stuff. GPSIM for
simulator works great, and it supports pluggable peripherals too. It
wasn't as featured as mplab last time I looked though, but having an
LCD display simulated is nifty :)



--
Hector Martin (RemoveMEhectorEraseMEspamEraseMEmarcansoft.com)
Public Key: http://www.marcansoft.com/hector.asc

2005\07\16@033012 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
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Herbert Graf wrote:

> The only thing that still bugs me about some Linux distros is upgrading.
> For some reason Redhat/Fedora has never been good on the "upgrade"
> front. It's gotten much better, but still isn't perfect.

Debian's packaging policy makes upgrade failures release-critical bugs.
 This is probably the number one reason I run Debian, with all its
quirks.

It *always* upgrades correctly or tells you that the package maintainer
simply wasn't clever enough and why and where you can find the
documentation.  (Which is required by the packaging policy to be in
/usr/share/doc/<packagename>, or that's listed as a very high importance
 bug, too.)

Just thought I'd share if you're interested in looking into alternatives.

Nate

2005\07\16@033434 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face
Luis Moreira wrote:
> Hi Byron/Herbert,
> Minicom seems to be the one, I just need to work out how to configure
> it... :)

Launch it and hit "CTRL-A Z" for a menu.  Depending on what you're
trying to do, you may have to go into the configuration menu and change
some things like your serial port settings, both the device name and
speed/bits/parity stuff.

It also has been around long enough that it assumes you're going to be
using it for modem communications, and it send generic modem init
strings by default.  You can turn these off in the configuration menu or
there are switch options to launch without modem initialization, "man
minicom" for those.

The commands are almost identical to "Telix", a popular DOS-based
terminal program from the days when BBS's were still wildly popular.

Nate

2005\07\16@034254 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face
Herbert Graf wrote:

> Well that's the interesting bit, yum doesn't recognize the package, I
> can't seem to figure out how to nuke it with rpm (rpm keeps saying not
> installed) and I certainly didn't install it!? Oh well, other stuff to
> do...

It can cause some problems, but rpm --rebuild-db might straighten things
out.  Your description kinda sounds like a problem I had once with
RPM-based stuff that didn't install fully so it never got "registered"
(to steal a Windows term) with RPM.

Also, have you tried uninstalling yum, making sure there's no cruft left
behind and reinstalling it so you get a new "default" yum package with
sane settings?  It's overkill, but when you're in a hurry...

How do you know you have a package installed if RPM doesn't see it?
What is it?  Can you post the output of rpm -qa ?  Was it even installed
as a package or just copied from a tarball or something?

Of course the ultimate if you really want something gone... just delete
it.  This is Unix after all where you can't do any lasting damage by
deleting an application unless something else is calling it that you
don't know about (otherwise you wouldn't delete it) or using its  shared
libraries.

Take a backup copy of it with tar, stash that somewhere "safe" on the
machine and delete the application, maybe doing a quick find through
your filesystem for any related files by the package name... done in
about 5 minutes.

Nate

2005\07\16@110832 by Herbert Graf

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On Sat, 2005-07-16 at 01:30 -0600, Nate Duehr wrote:
> Herbert Graf wrote:
>
> > The only thing that still bugs me about some Linux distros is upgrading.
> > For some reason Redhat/Fedora has never been good on the "upgrade"
> > front. It's gotten much better, but still isn't perfect.
>
> Debian's packaging policy makes upgrade failures release-critical bugs.
>   This is probably the number one reason I run Debian, with all its
> quirks.

I tried Debian. Being originally a slackware user turned redhat, debian
was simply too foreign to me. Beyond that I had a bear trying to install
it on a resource limited machine, likely because of my lack of
familiarity with debian itself.

Redhat/Fedora certainly isn't perfect, and it definitely has it's own
quirks, but I'm familiar with the quirks! :) Plus, Redhat Enterprise is
what the IT department uses at work, so it's beneficial that I have as
much Redhat experience as possible. TTYL

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2005\07\16@123834 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
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Herbert Graf wrote:

> Redhat/Fedora certainly isn't perfect, and it definitely has it's own
> quirks, but I'm familiar with the quirks! :) Plus, Redhat Enterprise is
> what the IT department uses at work, so it's beneficial that I have as
> much Redhat experience as possible. TTYL

Understood.  If you're looking for RHEL experience, you can download
Centos for home use.  It's basically RHEL for free, and your machines
would match the work machines quirk for quirk.  ;-)

Nate

2005\07\16@171046 by John Nall

picon face
Nate Duehr wrote:

> > Understood.  If you're looking for RHEL experience, you can download
> Centos for home use.  It's basically RHEL for free, and your machines
> would match the work machines quirk for quirk.  ;-)


This is the first time that I have heard of Centos.  I went to their
website and read about it.  I have to say that it seems to me that they
are just grabbing Redhat binaries and giving them another name, since
their FAQ is full of all sorts of references to Redhat (which they will
not refer to by name -- "North American distributor???").  Seems kind of
sleazy to me, to be honest.  Redhat has always allowed you to download
their binaries free.

John

2005\07\17@055506 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
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John Nall wrote:

> This is the first time that I have heard of Centos.  I went to their
> website and read about it.  I have to say that it seems to me that they
> are just grabbing Redhat binaries and giving them another name, since
> their FAQ is full of all sorts of references to Redhat (which they will
> not refer to by name -- "North American distributor???").  Seems kind of
> sleazy to me, to be honest.  Redhat has always allowed you to download
> their binaries free.

No this is definitely not what they're doing.

RedHat no longer distributes a free OS, they only distribute RedHat
Enterprise versions (there is more than one version) commercially now.

RedHat no longer makes a desktop free desktop distro either.  They
graciously host and support the Fedora Core project, which took the RH
9.0 code and continued it.  Fedora Core 4 is out, if that gives you a
feel for how long things have been this way -- you're at least a year
behind!

RedHat Enterprise is a commercial-only product, but the SOURCE code is
still free under the GPL.  RedHat has been dedicated to that and still is.

So, CentOS just compiles the already published source for people who
don't need/want to pay for RHEL versions.

Typically companies pay for RHEL versions, for whatever reasons...
(support, "guarantees", whatever... business doesn't always make sense.,
while more savvy companies grab a copy of CentOS, WhiteBox Linux, or any
of the other RHEL source-derived packages.  The codes the same, either
way, and clueful CIO's know this and use it to a hefty competitive
advantage, taking the risk that if they need RH's support, they won't
have it.  Thus, they hires really clever sysadmins to maintain their stuff.

Nothing about CentOS or WhiteBox Linux bothers RedHat themselves in the
slightest... they're still firmly entrenched in the GPL, which means
they publish their source -- if you've got the time, energy, and friends
to help you, you can create your own distro from it.  Like the folks
that started CentOS did.

Nate

2005\07\17@061214 by Marcel Birthelmer

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I believe the particulars of the RHEL terms of use state that nothing
bearing the redhat logo can be run without having paid them, or
something to that effect, since they can't prohibit distribution of the
source itself. This is why WhiteBox and CentOS make very certain to
remove all RH graphics etc. from the distribution.
- Marcel

Nate Duehr wrote:
{Quote hidden}

[snip]

2005\07\17@074350 by John Nall

picon face
Nate Duehr wrote:

> > RedHat no longer distributes a free OS, they only distribute RedHat
> Enterprise versions (there is more than one version) commercially
> now.  ( . . . snip, snip . . .)
>
>  Fedora Core 4 is out, if that gives you a feel for how long things
> have been this way -- you're at least a year behind!
>
I'm probably more than a year behind, apparently!  Thanks for the very
good explanation of how things stand.  My original comment was a little
bit snotty, based upon the wrong facts, and I appreciate your explaining
the situation.

John

2005\07\18@075407 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi Guys,
I am trying to use Minicom but every time I go to use it it comes back
with "Minicom: there is no global configuration file /etc/minirc.df1 ask
your sysadm to create one (using minicom -s)".
I tried to use this command and it keeps on telling me the same thing. I
can not create this file.
I think I am working as Root but it seems I am not. The password is
correct as I used it in other things and it worked. Is there any way of
seeing how many accounts have I generated when I first installed FC3 and
the usernames?
To login as Root do I give the username: Root & password?
Best regards
               Luis





2005\07\18@085212 by Herbert Graf

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On Sat, 2005-07-16 at 01:42 -0600, Nate Duehr wrote:
> Herbert Graf wrote:
>
> > Well that's the interesting bit, yum doesn't recognize the package, I
> > can't seem to figure out how to nuke it with rpm (rpm keeps saying not
> > installed) and I certainly didn't install it!? Oh well, other stuff to
> > do...
>
> It can cause some problems, but rpm --rebuild-db might straighten things
> out.  Your description kinda sounds like a problem I had once with
> RPM-based stuff that didn't install fully so it never got "registered"
> (to steal a Windows term) with RPM.

I almost got to that point. I've heard though that sometimes
--rebuild-db can cause more problems then it solves, which is why I was
holding off on that one.

> Also, have you tried uninstalling yum, making sure there's no cruft left
> behind and reinstalling it so you get a new "default" yum package with
> sane settings?  It's overkill, but when you're in a hurry...

How does the saying go: alike minds think alike? Tried that as well,
with no change.

> How do you know you have a package installed if RPM doesn't see it?
> What is it?  Can you post the output of rpm -qa ?  Was it even installed
> as a package or just copied from a tarball or something?

This was the bit that solved it for me, thank you.

I did a -qa before, but the package being complained about by yum never
appeared. So I grepped -qa with substrings of the package name. Turns
out that somehow -qa thought an older package was installed, yet yum
detected it as newer package. That's why neither yum nor rpm could find
it!??!??! No clue how that one happened, it deals with emacs, so it's
something I would personally have never touched (never been an emacs
fan, vile is the way to glory!). I'm going to call it an artifact of
Fedora's upgrade process from FC3 to FC4, but I have no proof.

Anyways, I removed the package in question, and retried yum, and after
1GB and 956 packages I'm now updated!?!! Thanks for your help.

TTYL


-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2005\07\18@112413 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Mon, 2005-07-18 at 12:54 +0100, Luis Moreira wrote:
> Hi Guys,
> I am trying to use Minicom but every time I go to use it it comes back
> with "Minicom: there is no global configuration file /etc/minirc.df1 ask
> your sysadm to create one (using minicom -s)".
> I tried to use this command and it keeps on telling me the same thing. I
> can not create this file.
> I think I am working as Root but it seems I am not. The password is
> correct as I used it in other things and it worked. Is there any way of
> seeing how many accounts have I generated when I first installed FC3 and
> the usernames?
> To login as Root do I give the username: Root & password?

Personally I'd never login directly as root, it's too easy to forget
you're root.

The best way to become root is at a prompt type: su (which stands for
pseudo user, user by default being root) and then the root password (and
then 'exit' when you're done).

As for minicom, I'm pretty sure the -s is the way to create the dfl (not
a 1 but an l). Try a 'll /etc | grep mini' to see if it's there. If not
you can just create it manually, try the following (this is my
minirc.dfl:

# Machine-generated file - use "minicom -s" to change parameters.
pr port             /dev/ttyUSBS0
pu baudrate         4800
pu bits             8
pu parity           N
pu stopbits         1
pu rtscts           No

You may want to change the /dev/ttyUSBS0 to something like /dev/ttyS0 if
minicom doesn't start (I use a USB serial port on my linux box).

Good luck. TTYL



-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2005\07\18@170837 by Peter

picon face


On Mon, 18 Jul 2005, Luis Moreira wrote:

{Quote hidden}

you can find the accounts using 'ls /home'

the root account has the username root not Root

minicom wants to save its configuration in /etc/minicom/minirc.xxx you
must create this default config using

su minicom -s

(supply the root password when asked), then be sure to save the config
'as default'.

Last, users can create and modify their own per-port configs. You must
save each config with a name.

Peter

2005\07\18@170949 by Peter

picon face

for su minicom actually use

su -c minicom -s

Peter


'[OT]: LINUX'
2005\08\15@032003 by Luis.Moreira
picon face


Luis Moreira
RemoveMEluis.moreiraspam_OUTspamKILLspamjet.uk
tel. 01235464615
JET PSU Department
UKAEA Culham Division
J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
Oxfordshire
OX14 3DB


{Original Message removed}

2005\08\15@034536 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi Guys,
I continue on my path to enlightenment...
I hit another snag with Minicom, which probably is also to do with the
serial ports. I configured Minicom as suggested and if I work as root
everything works fine, but when I work as another user as soon as I try
to use Minicom it comes up with the message that I do not have
permission to access the port. I know it must be a configuration file
for what the users are authorised to do with the ports but I can not
find it.
Can you guys get me on the right direction?
Another problem which I am getting to is how to install new packages.
With the .RPM distributions it's not a problem as the Fedora package
installer does all the work for me, but for let's say as an example I
need to install Eclipse then I need to get from Sun the file
j2re-1_4_2_09-linux-i586.bin but I do not know what to do with it, do I
have to use make to build the application?
Then I need to download the Eclipse files which come in a compressed
form... I manage to uncompress them but that's as far as I got, I now I
have to build it but I do not have a clue... can someone help.
I think this two problems are very fundamental and if I can get this
sorted it will advance enormously my Linux understanding, I know that
FC3 as all tools achieve installation of the packages, but I would like
to know about the normal way of doing things, as I think I will learn
more.
Thanks in advance for the help,
Best regards
               Luis

   



{Original Message removed}

2005\08\15@040306 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Aug 15, 2005, at 12:45 AM, Luis Moreira wrote:

> I hit another snag with Minicom, which probably is also to do with the
> serial ports. I configured Minicom as suggested and if I work as root
> everything works fine, but when I work as another user as soon as I try
> to use Minicom it comes up with the message that I do not have
> permission to access the port

Ensure that your io ports (which appear in unix as normal files)
have appropriate protections:

       sudo chmod 777 /dev/ttyS0 /dev/ttyS1

(that makes them completely unprotected, of course.  Better to
put them in a group and change the group permissions, but that
becomes more complicated.)  (Some unix utilities seem to change
the port protections for reasons I've never tracked down, so it
can be necessary to repeat this periodically (or track it down.)
For instance, reboots here seem to do some UUCP initialization
that results in UUCP owning /dev/ttyS0, even though there is no
UUCP actually running...)

BillW

2005\08\15@075006 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
I Bill,
Can you elaborate on this command, what am I saying with this?
I can understand the /dev ttyS0 and /dev/ttyS1 but what does sudo chmod
777 means? As it asks me for the root password I presume that the su
stands for super user...
Thanks
       Luis


Luis Moreira
RemoveMEluis.moreiraTakeThisOuTspamspamjet.uk
tel. 01235464615
JET PSU Department
UKAEA Culham Division
J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
Oxfordshire
OX14 3DB


{Original Message removed}

2005\08\15@084505 by Byron A Jeff

face picon face
On Mon, Aug 15, 2005 at 12:50:02PM +0100, Luis Moreira wrote:
> I Bill,
> Can you elaborate on this command, what am I saying with this?
> I can understand the /dev ttyS0 and /dev/ttyS1 but what does sudo chmod
> 777 means? As it asks me for the root password I presume that the su

chmod is the change mode command. It changes the permissions of a file.
The 777 means to give all users all permissions (read, write, and execute)
for the device. 666 (read,write) would work just as effectively here.

sudo is a command that facilitates executing a single command as root.
The password it's asking for is your password, not the root password.
Also you have to be in the /etc/sudoers file to have permission to
use sudo. Use the command visudo to edit the file.


> stands for super user...

That is correct.

Try this instead:

$ su -
Password <give the root password here>
# chmod 666 /dev/ttyS0
# exit
$

That should do it.

BAJ

2005\08\15@135532 by Peter

picon face

On Mon, 15 Aug 2005, William Chops Westfield wrote:

> put them in a group and change the group permissions, but that
> becomes more complicated.)  (Some unix utilities seem to change
> the port protections for reasons I've never tracked down, so it
> can be necessary to repeat this periodically (or track it down.)
> For instance, reboots here seem to do some UUCP initialization
> that results in UUCP owning /dev/ttyS0, even though there is no
> UUCP actually running...)

The uucp group and/or user exits however and the various programs that
use the serial port expect root.uucp to own the ports and the lock
system to be in /usr/spool/uucp (or /var/spool/uucp for *BSD or
/var/lock for Linux).

The port permissions reflect whether they are initialised or not. For
example if a port is a tty for a session then the ownership of the port
is changed to the session user during the session. I.e. if you log in
through a modem on ttyS0 then ttyS0 will become owned by you (your user
id) during the session. When you log out the ownership reverts to
the system. This is usually done by login(1) and by *getty(). By default
boot scripts and getty init sequences initialise the ttyS (including
permissions) at boot and at the end of every login session. The exact
details vary from system to system. Typically ports used for dialout
(e.g. pppd and uucp) init the port permissions to user uucp and/or group
uucp.

Peter

2005\08\15@145004 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Aug 15, 2005, at 5:45 AM, Byron A Jeff wrote:

> sudo is a command that facilitates executing a single command as root.
>
Yes.  Sorry.  "sudo <command>" around here is shorthand for
"execute <command> as the superuser", as well as a command that
does that (IFF the proper administrative framework has been set
up.)  You could log in as root, or use the traditional su command
as alternative methods.  ("sudo" is convenient in a multi-user
scenario, since you can revoke one user's privs without having to
change the actual root password...  Also, sudo works on MacOS even
if the root account has not been set up.)

BillW

2005\08\15@154818 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Aug 15, 2005, at 10:56 AM, Peter wrote:

> By default boot scripts and getty init sequences initialise the ttyS
> (including permissions) at boot and at the end of every login
> session. The exact details vary from system to system.

The particularly annoying thing I seem to see is that a console
login/logout seems to result in permission changes for the serial
ports.  Most of my access to the system in question is via X and
the network...

BillW

2005\08\16@031930 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi Guys
Thank you very much for the help with the serial ports it worked a
treat; I can now talk to my board using Minicom!!!
I have now hit another problem:
I need to install BINUTILS and I am a bit lost...
I went to the web site for BINUTILS and I was directed to the list of
files, the most recent ones are the binutils-2.16.1 from 12th June 2005.
But there are six of them... do I need them all?
I downloaded some of them and I went as far as uncompress the files but
I do not know what to do with them...
I have tried using MAKE but it did not work...
Can someone give me a brief description, if there is such a thing, of
the steps I need to follow and what am I looking for.
Thanks
               Luis



{Original Message removed}

2005\08\16@045719 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>
>Luis Moreira
>EraseMEluis.moreiraspamspamspamBeGonejet.uk
>tel. 01235464615
>JET PSU Department
>UKAEA Culham Division
>J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
>Abingdon
>Oxfordshire
>OX14 3DB

Are you are not far from me then.

Sorry can't help with the problems you are having though.


Alan B. Pearce
Space Science and Technology Department
R25 Rm 1-122
Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
Chilton
Didcot
OXON OX11 OQX
United Kingdom


Tel +44 1235 44 6532
Fax +44 1235 44 5848



2005\08\16@144918 by Jose Da Silva

flavicon
face
On August 16, 2005 12:19 am, Luis Moreira wrote:
> Hi Guys
> Thank you very much for the help with the serial ports it worked a
> treat; I can now talk to my board using Minicom!!!
> I have now hit another problem:
> I need to install BINUTILS and I am a bit lost...
> I went to the web site for BINUTILS and I was directed to the list of
> files, the most recent ones are the binutils-2.16.1 from 12th June
> 2005. But there are six of them... do I need them all?

No, you only need the latest, however, you mentioned that you are
running Fedora, and wouldn't it be simpler to just pick up a fedora
RPM?
http://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/core/updates/3/

The simplest path is to select an already pre-compiled RPM.
I'm guessing you have Pentium type computer, so you would probably
select i386 from the menu above.
the benefits of going this route is it's already done for you, plus if
there are any updates or bug fixes, you are already setup in some
fashion to get warnings to "please-update-your-binutils" .... well, at
least it works that way for Mandake/Mandriva  ;-)

If you are more into compiling your own version, I would suggest using
the SRPM path on the fedora page above.
It may not be the absolute latest version, but the benefits are that it
does put stuff in the Fedora directories (which may not be the same as
the directories used by the binutil page you got your files from.
The binutil webpage (as many other projects) is probably/usually setup
for debian-style linux, which tends to have a slightly different
directory setup.

> I downloaded some of them and I went as far as uncompress the files
> but I do not know what to do with them...
> I have tried using MAKE but it did not work...

It is usually....
1)download the file.
2)unzip or untar it into a temporary directory.
3)go into the root of that source code directory and you should see a
README.  Read the README.   ;-)  you could do this using an X program.
4ou will need to open a terminal shell so that you can type in
command-line instructions, then cd to the correct directory.
5)in the root of that source directory, you will probably find a
"configure", and you need to  "./configure"  before you  "make"
6)then you "make"
7)then you change to a su or root user by typing su and your password
8)then you "make install"
9)If the ./configure or "make" or "make install" stop early due to
errors, you may be missing something else that those script/batch-file
programs need to do their work, so you may need to preinstall some
other stuff first such as gcc for compiling C code or other stuff.

...again, since you mentioned you are new to linux, I would recommend
that you use the Fedora SRPMs to do the above 7 steps versus using the
ones setup on the binutils website.... with more practice/familiarity
of seeing what happens and understanding, I'm sure you can do that one
too... just give yourself some time to familiarize yourself with linux
first.

> Can someone give me a brief description, if there is such a thing, of
> the steps I need to follow and what am I looking for.

I hope the steps above help you.
No, I did not go to the binutils website, but I'm more or less
suggesting the steps I would do for other projects.

2005\08\16@161423 by Peter

picon face

On Mon, 15 Aug 2005, William Chops Westfield wrote:

> On Aug 15, 2005, at 10:56 AM, Peter wrote:
>
>> By default boot scripts and getty init sequences initialise the ttyS
>> (including permissions) at boot and at the end of every login
>> session. The exact details vary from system to system.
>
> The particularly annoying thing I seem to see is that a console
> login/logout seems to result in permission changes for the serial
> ports.  Most of my access to the system in question is via X and
> the network...

So change the login program so it does not do that anymore and set
permissions on the port as you like (assuming you run linux of *bsd
where you can do whatever you like with the source). I prefer 660 and
something like root.uucp and make users who are supposed to be able to
use the tty members of the uucp group. But in my limited experience this
is a recipe for incompatibility with most, if not all, *nix comms
programs out there. Starting with login. (guess what prevents multiple
logins on the same tty, and your favorite dialout program from dialing
out through the terminal you are using ?).

The point is that the permissions of ttyS that are not assigned to
dialout and session programs (like getty, login etc), *never* change
permissions after being set up at boot time (and on *BSD not even then).
So it's easy:

- multiplexed tty: someone switches the permissions all the time, and
you get used to it
- dedicated tty: you set the permissions and nobody changes them.

This is a policy decision and requires no changes to programs imho.

Peter

2005\08\16@162121 by Peter

picon face

Luis, what distribution do you run ? You should have joined the local
linux user group's mailing list by email a long time ago imho.

Depending on what distribution you run, there is a tool for getting
packages and installing them. Ubuntu has emerge, Debian has apt-get etc.
So you locate the exact package you need using the website of the
distribution you are using, and then use the tool directly to get and
install what you need. The tool downloads directly from the internet,
there is no need for you to get the packages. It also handles
dependencies. For exampl with debian:

find out what distribution you are running, the kernel version and the C
compiler version (the latter two are uname -a and gcc --version). Then
go to http://www.debian.org->packages->search and enter binutils. You get many
answers, one per distribution, and several packages per distribution.
You will need binutils and likely binutils-dev (development package). So
you now do (as root):

       apt-get install binutils-dev

and magic happens. You need to be connected. You do not need to download
the packages. For Ubuntu you use emerge instead of apt-get (with
different parameters, read the fine manual)

Peter

2005\08\17@054316 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi Guys,
Thank you all for the help, I have managed to do it!!!
It came up with a lot of stuff that I did not understand but it seems to
have done it... at least the binutils are there...

Another question I have is this:
       
I have my Linux machine at home and because I have a three hour drive
min. every day I do not do a lot of Linux work during the week. Is there
any way of accessing my home machine remotely safely? What I am looking
for is something that will give me full control of my machine at home,
so that it would be like sitting in front of it. Speed of connection at
work or at home is not a problem and I have access to a Unix system and
a Linux system at work so this software does not need to be windows
based, but it would be better.
Thanks for your help.
Best regards
               Luis



Luis Moreira
RemoveMEluis.moreiraKILLspamspamjet.uk
tel. 01235464615
JET PSU Department
UKAEA Culham Division
J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
Oxfordshire
OX14 3DB


{Original Message removed}

2005\08\17@082413 by John Pfaff

picon face
1) Get an X server for Windoze (x-win32 or the like, don't know if there
are any free ones out there) and use PuTTY (Windoze ssh suite) and use X
Forwarding.  That way your remote Linux system can use your local
display as if it were its own.

2) ssh from UNIX or Linux, make sure X forwarding is on.  Same result as
above as long as your using X and not just a plain text login.

JP

Luis Moreira wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

2005\08\17@084809 by Rolf

face picon face
Luis Moreira wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

2005\08\17@085135 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi John,
I had a look at the TighVNC, what do you think?
Best regards
               Luis

Luis Moreira
KILLspamluis.moreiraspamBeGonespamjet.uk
tel. 01235464615
JET PSU Department
UKAEA Culham Division
J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
Oxfordshire
OX14 3DB


{Original Message removed}

2005\08\17@093140 by John Pfaff

picon face
The following may be prejudiced because I like to stay away from Windoze
when I can ;)

Do you mean TightVNC?  I tried to Google TighVNC and got some things
that didn't look right.  I took a quick look at it.  It looks like it
will do the trick.

I've never been a big fan of vnc, probably because everything I've
wanted to do I could do with ssh..  Since you're going to a Linux
machine, I would probably just stick with ssh/X.  The way I see it, you
have a few options:
- Work Windoze - Home Linux
- Work UNIX/Linux - Home Linux
The easiest (read least amount of setup involved) solution I see is to
ssh from your work UNIX/Linux workstation to your home Linux workstation
with X11 forwarding.  You just have to make sure your home Linux
workstation will allow X11 forwarding.  Find sshd_config (probably in
/etc/ssh) and make sure there is a line "X11Forwarding yes" in there.  
If you have to, restart sshd and you should be all set.  When ssh'ing
into your Linux box, make sure you use forwarding as well (ssh -X).

Luis Moreira wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

2005\08\17@110538 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi John,
Yes, I meant TightVNC, sorry if I got you into some weird website.
I will try your way with SSH.
Thanks
       Luis

Luis Moreira
@spam@luis.moreira@spam@spamspam_OUTjet.uk
tel. 01235464615
JET PSU Department
UKAEA Culham Division
J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
Oxfordshire
OX14 3DB


{Original Message removed}

2005\08\17@122418 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face
Luis Moreira wrote:
> Hi John,
> Yes, I meant TightVNC, sorry if I got you into some weird website.
> I will try your way with SSH.
> Thanks
>        Luis

Unless you're doing something that *requires* graphics (rare on
Unix/Linux) ssh should cover it... and as someone else mentioned ssh can
also forward X traffic from your applications on the *nix machine to any
other X server machine in the world...

Most ssh daemon default configurations these days have ForwardX11 or
similar in their configuration files set to NO for security reasons.
You'll have to change your configuration and restart sshd.

You will have to have a way to find your public IP address if you're on
a DHCP-provided address from your provider (assuming that it *is* a
public address).

http://www.no-ip.com may be useful in that case.

Otherwise, if you have a "real" Internet connection with a nice normal
static IP address (very rare these days) you should be able to just ssh
to your home machine whenever you feel like it, as long as you haven't
placed a firewall in front of it.

If you have a NAT router in front of it, like most home setups will,
you'll need the no-ip solution to find your machine's IP and you'll also
need to forward port 22 through your router.  I highly recommend editing
 your ssh daemon's configuration (while you're near the machine --
you're bound to do it wrong and lock yourself out at least once in your
life) to something other than port 22, as a lot of malware hunts for
older versions of ssh and having port 22 open to the world will drive
you batty if you watch your logs carefully.

Nate

2005\08\17@141650 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Wed, 2005-08-17 at 09:28 -0400, John Pfaff wrote:
> The following may be prejudiced because I like to stay away from Windoze
> when I can ;)
>
> Do you mean TightVNC?  I tried to Google TighVNC and got some things
> that didn't look right.  I took a quick look at it.  It looks like it
> will do the trick.
>
> I've never been a big fan of vnc, probably because everything I've
> wanted to do I could do with ssh..  Since you're going to a Linux
> machine, I would probably just stick with ssh/X.  T

ssh/X has one MAJOR disadvantage: session preservation. If you have to
shut your laptop down, or you want to switch machines, or your network
connection hiccups, everything you've started under ssh/X is gone. You
have to restart it all.

With VNC the session remains, no matter what happens. Even multiple
machines can connect to the same VNC session at the same time, good for
debugging something with other people.

Heck, I'm writing this message on my Linux box at home from work,
through a VNC connection.

Some people complain VNC is too slow, and it can be, if you don't have
it set up correctly. One major problem with VNC though is you do need a
relatively fast connection, but more importantly LOW latency connection.
High latency becomes very frustrating. But doing X remotely has the same
limitations, so I don't really see that as an issue between them. One
benefit over X is that VNC tends to be more efficient with bandwidth,
especially some of the newer versions of VNC.

TTYL


-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2005\08\18@035556 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
Hi all,
I managed to connect from my windows machine to the Linux machine at
home using SSH and Putty, it's great !!!
But at work I can not connect either using SSH or Putty. I later found
out that is to do with the work firewall, over which I have no control.
The question is, is there any way to get around that? Would VNC be able
to do it?
Any other comments appreciated. Keep in mind I am new at this so the
less configuration the better...
Best regards
               Luis
 

Luis Moreira
spamBeGoneluis.moreiraspamKILLspamjet.uk
tel. 01235464615
JET PSU Department
UKAEA Culham Division
J20/1/55, Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
Oxfordshire
OX14 3DB


{Original Message removed}

2005\08\18@074544 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Luis Moreira wrote:

> But at work I can not connect either using SSH or Putty. I later found
> out that is to do with the work firewall, over which I have no control.
> The question is, is there any way to get around that? Would VNC be able
> to do it?

Not sure about VNC, but you probably should try to find out what ports are
open for you in the firewall at work, and then try to find a solution that
uses only these ports (RTFM or so... :) -- port requirements are usually
well defined and documented in the Linux and open source world).

Gerhard

2005\08\18@080816 by Rolf

face picon face
Circumenting the work firewall may be against work policy .... but....

Firewalls typically block all but a few "well known" ports. The well
known ports are typically 80 for http, 443 for https, 25 for mail, etc.

In your case I would alter your sshd config file at home to also listen
on port 443 (you are not running a secure web-site are you...?)

This will most likely not be blocked by your work firewall. You will
have to specify port 443 as the destination port for your connection
from putty.

Work will be expecting encrypted traffic to port 443....

Another way to skin the cat is at your home firewall to "forward" port
443 on the outside to port 22 on your linux box.

Rolf

Luis Moreira wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2005\08\18@151717 by Peter

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On Thu, 18 Aug 2005, Luis Moreira wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Run sshd at home on port 80

Peter


'[OT]: linux'
2008\03\24@132557 by Andre Abelian
flavicon
face
Hi to all,

What's slackware for lenux? I searched on line there are some
explanation but I still do not get it. I want to get most from linux os
and I do not know what else is available. Now I know about KDE, Gnome.
I use Fedora OS it works very well so far.
I found info about WINE to use windows applications but for some reason it freezes for me.
I downloaded almost 80% of packages but all of them look like small software
no thing serous.


my question is

1. what is slackware
2. how can I make wine work to use MPLAB?
3. what else should I use to make linux cooler looking?
4. what should I use to make linux look like mac?

thanks

Andre

 

2008\03\24@133720 by Marcel Birthelmer

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face
Andre,
Slackware is (was?) a rather old Linux distribution. Since you're using
Fedora, you don't need to concern yourself with it.
If you don't like Wine so much, one option is VMware to run Windows inside
an emulated system (it still manages to be quite fast). Alternatively, you
could give the gputils suite of linux pic programs (assembler, linker, etc.)
a try.
For making things look good, you can try setting up beryl. It has more eye
candy than is good for you.
To make your system look like a mac, check out the different Window Manager
and GTK themes that are available.
Regards,
- Marcel

On Mon, Mar 24, 2008 at 10:25 AM, Andre Abelian <.....aabelianspam_OUTspammason-electric.com>
wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\03\24@134910 by Robert Young

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> 2. how can I make wine work to use MPLAB?

Something to keep in mind as an option is SciLab.  http://www.scilab.org I believe is their web site.  Quite similar to Matlab and relatively straightforward to translate from Matlab to SciLab for many problems.  

Rob

2008\03\24@142401 by Byron Jeff

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face
On Mon, Mar 24, 2008 at 01:25:38PM -0400, Andre Abelian wrote:
> Hi to all,
>
> What's slackware for lenux?

Slackware is one of many Linux distributions. It's current claim to fame is
that it's the oldest continuous Linux distribution in existance. IIRC
Slackware came online in Late 1993 as a series of patches to the dominant
Linux distribution at the time, SLS Linux.

> I searched on line there are some explanation but I still do not get it.

Well the Pro to Slackware is its stability and simplicity. The con is the
fact that Slack still doesn't have a comprehensive package management
scheme with dependency management. I finally put Slack aside about 4 years
ago over this issue.

> I want to get most from linux os
> and I do not know what else is available.

Everything you ever wanted to know about Linux distributions can be found
here:

http://distrowatch.com/

> Now I know about KDE, Gnome.
> I use Fedora OS it works very well so far.

If it works, then why are you looking elsewhere?

> I found info about WINE to use windows applications but for some reason it freezes for me.

That's a typical WINE issue.

> I downloaded almost 80% of packages but all of them look like small software
> no thing serous.

???

>
>
> my question is
>
> 1. what is slackware

See above.

> 2. how can I make wine work to use MPLAB?

Not worth the trouble. There are enough native packages for PIC development
under Linux, that there's no need for MPLAB.

Start by taking a look at GPUtils: http://gputils.sf.net

also here's a article I came across right quick discussing PIC development
on Linux: http://www.micahcarrick.com/04-19-2005/pic-programming-linux.html

> 3. what else should I use to make linux cooler looking?

Out of my scope. My understanding that the Beryl interface is supposed to
do that. But personally I find the issue completely orthogonal to getting
work done.

> 4. what should I use to make linux look like mac?

No clue. Anyone?

BAJ

2008\03\25@045345 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: TakeThisOuTpiclist-bounces.....spamTakeThisOuTmit.edu [TakeThisOuTpiclist-bouncesKILLspamspamspammit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

That's an interesting open source project, but possibly not as useful as
MPLAB for PIC development!

Regards

Mike

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2008\03\25@072223 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Tue, Mar 25, 2008 at 1:25 AM, Andre Abelian
<.....aabelianspamRemoveMEmason-electric.com> wrote:
> Now I know about KDE, Gnome.
> I use Fedora OS it works very well so far.
>
> my question is
>
> 1. what is slackware
Just another Linux distribution and will not help you doing PIC
developement better than Fedora.

> 2. how can I make wine work to use MPLAB?
You can but the hardware integrated will not work properly.

Last time I wrote a mini-howto in Microchip forum
and it got 27047 hits as of now. The last time I
tried it (Ubuntu 7.10, MPLAB 7.62, certain version
of C18 and C30), no major problem with the software
components. Still VMware/Windows is better solution
if you do not like dual boot. Personally I prefer dual
boot Linux/Windows to use MPLAB under Windows.
http://forum.microchip.com/tm.aspx?m=112347&mpage=2

You may want to read some of the posts here if
you really want to do PIC work under Linux.
http://forum.microchip.com/tt.aspx?forumid=182

> 3. what else should I use to make linux cooler looking?
It will slow your computer by quite a lot and IMHO is the
wrong direction for Linux to go.

> 4. what should I use to make linux look like mac?
Buy a Mac if you like it. Make Linux to look like Mac
does not help you use Linux any better.

Xiaofan

2008\03\25@091905 by Robert Young

picon face


> >
> >
> >
> > > 2. how can I make wine work to use MPLAB?
> >
> > Something to keep in mind as an option is SciLab.  http://www.scilab.org I
> > believe is their web site.  Quite similar to Matlab and relatively
> > straightforward to translate from Matlab to SciLab for many problems.
> >
> > Rob
>
> That's an interesting open source project, but possibly not as useful as
> MPLAB for PIC development!
>
> Regards
Right!  Never answer mailing list questions when tired and distracted!  MPLAB became MatLab!  My mistake.

Rob

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