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'[OT]: Ignition design question'
2001\03\21@193833 by Barry Gershenfeld

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>> circuit that will cut out cylinders with the push of a button.

>YEOUCH! DON'T CUT IGNITION!

Hey, this was a perfectly valid method in the 1920's.  You
mean it's no good now? ;-)

Barry

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2001\03\21@221736 by James Montebello

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It's still a valid technique today.  Typically, you'll see rev limiters
using two to three stages, the first stage being significant ignition
retard, followed by cutting ignition in, say, half the cylinders, followed
by cutting it in all of the cylinders.  Traction control systems use a
similar system, usually with less drastic curves.  Cutting fuel instead
will typically cause more engine damage than cutting ignition.  Very
recently, you've started to see traction control systems that directly
manipulate the throttle, but these are still relatively rare.

james montebello

On Wed, 21 Mar 2001, Barry Gershenfeld wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\03\21@224753 by John Pearson

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I will be cutting cylinders, like one every 7 firings (V8) to spread the
missfire around evenly. Oh, and it is carbed.

Anyway, so I should use an opamp from the distributor reluctor for the pic
to look at? Should I clip the input with some zeners?
And should I shunt the signal I want to miss or cut it off from the
ignition module?  I would think shunting the pulse from the distributor
reluctor would be the easiest?

Thanks

John


----------
> From: James Montebello <.....jamesmKILLspamspam.....LAPUWALI.COM>
> To: EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OT]: Ignition design question
> Date: Wednesday, March 21, 2001 7:17 PM
>
> It's still a valid technique today.  Typically, you'll see rev limiters
> using two to three stages, the first stage being significant ignition
> retard, followed by cutting ignition in, say, half the cylinders,
followed
{Quote hidden}

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2001\03\21@225909 by Neil Bradley

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> similar system, usually with less drastic curves.  Cutting fuel instead
> will typically cause more engine damage than cutting ignition.

Uh, no. You didn't see my original post, did you? I don't know where you
get that idea, but I've seen warped heads, exhaust manifolds burned almost
with holes in them, valves with cracks in them, etc... all caused by a
misfiring cylinders (bad plugs, cracked wires, weak spark, bad coils, bad
points, or weak electronic ignition systems).

Fuel cut is what manufacturers do because cutting ignition and still
providing fuel is bad for the engine. Mazda, BMW, Dodge, Toyota, and
Chevrolet/GM all have rev limiters that cut fuel - not ignition.

-->Neil

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Neil Bradley            There'd be no more N'Sync if everyone had guns.
Synthcom Systems, Inc.
ICQ #29402898

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2001\03\22@023126 by Chris Carr

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>Very
> recently, you've started to see traction control systems that directly
> manipulate the throttle, but these are still relatively rare.
>
I know you have been talking about petrol engines but I would like to
point out that in Europe all LGV's (HGV's, Trucks, Lorries, Rigs, whatever
you call them in your part of the world) are fitted with speed limiters
which operate on the throttle either directly by mechanical linkage or
indirectly through the engine management system. Taking a look at these
systems could prove to be productive.

Just a thought.

As a proof of concept we successfully tricked one of these control units
into acting as a traction control system on a lorry. The conclusion we came
to was that the basic difference between speed and traction control is the
parameters measured by the input sensors.

Regards
Chris

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2001\03\22@091238 by Ken Gasper

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I would think that most (if not all) domestic factory traction control
systems directly control the throttle.  I had a 1995 Z28 with traction
control and something called "Acceleration Slip Regulation" (ASR).  I was
very supprised the first time (and definitely not the only time) I
accelerated too fast and felt the ASR kick in pushing the accelerator pedal
back at me.





James Montebello <TakeThisOuTjamesmEraseMEspamspam_OUTLAPUWALI.COM>EraseMEspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU> on 03/21/2001
09:17:13 PM

Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list
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Subject:  Re: [OT]: Ignition design question


It's still a valid technique today.  Typically, you'll see rev limiters
using two to three stages, the first stage being significant ignition
retard, followed by cutting ignition in, say, half the cylinders, followed
by cutting it in all of the cylinders.  Traction control systems use a
similar system, usually with less drastic curves.  Cutting fuel instead
will typically cause more engine damage than cutting ignition.  Very
recently, you've started to see traction control systems that directly
manipulate the throttle, but these are still relatively rare.

james montebello

On Wed, 21 Mar 2001, Barry Gershenfeld wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\03\22@094800 by John Pearson

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Some how, I don't feel real comfortable with anything attatched to the
throttle. Also, I am not sure the NHRA would allow it.

Thanks

----------
> From: Ken Gasper <EraseMEKenneth.R.GasperspamspamspamBeGoneSEAGATE.COM>
> To: RemoveMEPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OT]: Ignition design question
> Date: Thursday, March 22, 2001 6:12 AM
>
> I would think that most (if not all) domestic factory traction control
> systems directly control the throttle.  I had a 1995 Z28 with traction
> control and something called "Acceleration Slip Regulation" (ASR).  I was
> very supprised the first time (and definitely not the only time) I
> accelerated too fast and felt the ASR kick in pushing the accelerator
pedal
{Quote hidden}

followed
{Quote hidden}

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