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'[OT]: How to print words on enclosure box?'
2001\07\31@123651 by John Waters

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Hi All,

I want the user know the function of each switch such as "POWER", "RESET",
etc., of my circuit. So I need to print some words on the surface of the
enclosure box. These printed words must be non-erasable. What is the best
way to do?

Thanks in advance!

John





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2001\07\31@124526 by Douglas Butler

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What is the box made of, material and texture?  What volume of product?

Sherpa Doug

{Quote hidden}

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2001\07\31@143820 by Barry Gershenfeld

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>I want the user know the function of each switch such as "POWER", "RESET",
>etc., of my circuit. So I need to print some words on the surface of the
>enclosure box. These printed words must be non-erasable. What is the best
>way to do?
>John

Sounds like you are using some kind of dry-transfer lettering.  What
you can do is spray clear lacquer (sold along with other spray paint)
over it.  Another source of clear lacquer is clear nail polish.  With
that you have to be careful because it dissolves the print and you
can smear it if you brush it too much.  I've used it--20 years later
the printing is still there.

Hmm, 20 years later, I hope you can still buy lacquer!

Barry

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2001\07\31@145239 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 11:28 AM 7/31/01 -0700, you wrote:
>Hmm, 20 years later, I hope you can still buy lacquer!

There is some nice spray stuff you can buy in art stores that will do the
trick (don't have a can right in front of me, I think it's actually acrylic),
but the dry transfer lettering is getting scarce.

Bset regards,
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2001\07\31@145917 by John Walker

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My favorite way to accomplish this is to layout how I want the panel to
look in Autocad. You could
of course use any graphics package or word processor for that matter. I
then print a mirror image
of the design onto a clear overhead slide. The I use a spray-on glue to
attach the slide to the enclosure.
By printing a mirror image, the toner is sealed between the slide and the
enclosure so it can never be
scratched off through normal use. Neat and clean!!

At 11:28 AM 7/31/01 -0700, Barry Gershenfeld wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\07\31@151728 by Nicolas Fournel

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Hello,

What about labellers (Brother, Casio...). Brother has a lot of different tapes (you can choose the size, the text and background colors, (the background can be transparent)). They are very resistant, to water, heat, even chemicals (and better looking than Casio tapes, IMHO). Some labellers can be connected to a PC to create small logos, but they are quite expensive.  I'm using a brother PT1800 and it's really fast and looks great...
BTW, the idea of John Walker is really great too, I will try it !

Nicolas



>>> John Walker <.....jjwKILLspamspam.....SEI.CMU.EDU> 07/31/01 11:59AM >>>
My favorite way to accomplish this is to layout how I want the panel to
look in Autocad. You could
of course use any graphics package or word processor for that matter. I
then print a mirror image
of the design onto a clear overhead slide. The I use a spray-on glue to
attach the slide to the enclosure.
By printing a mirror image, the toner is sealed between the slide and the
enclosure so it can never be
scratched off through normal use. Neat and clean!!

At 11:28 AM 7/31/01 -0700, Barry Gershenfeld wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\07\31@164506 by Nick Masluk

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For my projects I will either use one of those cheap
labelers that you punch letters one at a time into a
plastic tape, but when I want something a better
looking I'll use a laminated tape labeling machine.
Mine is the PT-310 from Brother (see
http://www.brother.com/usa/common/walkthrough/office/office_label.html),
they support different fonts, as well as have
different colored text and backgrounds depending on
the tape used.

--Nick


--- John Waters <EraseMEjohn_fm_watersspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTHOTMAIL.COM> wrote:
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2001\07\31@165550 by Brent Brown

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> My favorite way to accomplish this is to layout how I want the
> panel to look in Autocad. You could of course use any graphics
> package or word processor for that matter. I then print a mirror
> image of the design onto a clear overhead slide. The I use a
> spray-on glue to attach the slide to the enclosure. By printing a
> mirror image, the toner is sealed between the slide and the
> enclosure so it can never be scratched off through normal use. Neat
> and clean!!
>

This an excellent method (I use it myself!). I would just like to add
that you can spray white enamel paint onto the back of the label to
make it look better, and double sided tape also works really well for
sticking it down (or up, or wherever).

Brent Brown
Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street
Hamilton, New Zealand
Ph/fax: +64 7 849 0069
Mobile/text: 025 334 069
eMail:  brent.brownspamspam_OUTclear.net.nz

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2001\07\31@170834 by Douglas Butler

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For one-off jobs I use the Brother tapes.  Black on silver looks good on
aluminum boxes, but beware the silver turns black when soaked in
seawater.  I think the metallic silver pigment corrodes.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\07\31@173730 by Thomas McGahee

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The following site has a discussion of various methods:

http://fstewart.ne.mediaone.net/DaEtiCsuiLblMethods.html

Here are a few methods I have used:

1) MAKE YOUR OWN DECALS
Print using a Laser Printer to DynaArt Toner Transfer paper.
Then spray on a few light coats of lacquer directly over the
printed area. A few light coats works better than one heavy
coat. Let the coated image dry for at least an hour for best
results. Use scissors to trim the paper to the proper size,
and then place the Toner Transfer paper image-side-up in
a bowl or pan of water. The paper may curl a little at first
because the back-side of the paper absorbs water faster than the
side that was sprayed. Be patient. After a minute or so you will
see the decal separating from the paper. Apply as you would
a regular decal, that is, by sliding it off of the paper
onto the desired surface. I usually get one side slightly
off the paper and then slide the paper out slowly so the
decal has a minimum of stress applied.

Avoid bubbles, but if they occur, wipe them out towards the
edge. On some materials you can remove the lacquer carrier
with ordinary denatured alcohol. (Alcohol will mar certain
surfaces). Wait until decal is totally dry!
Use a gentle circular motion, using an absorbent
cloth such as an old T-shirt.

On the other hand, you might opt to let the decal totally dry
and then give it one or two coats of lacquer spray so that the
entire work surface has a coating of laquer.

2) MAKE A VANITY PLATE.
Using a Laser Printer, print a MIRROR image to DynaArt Toner
Transfer paper. Use an iron to transfer the toner image to the
vanity plate. Soak the vanity plate in water until the transfer
paper floats away from the plate. Rinse carefully under cold
running water and carefully dry. (I use warm air to dry). Once
vanity plate is totally dry, you can spray a couple of thin coats
of lacquer over the entire surface. Several thin coats are
better than one thick coat. It is best to allow a few minutes
drying time between coats.

Vanity plates must be able to withstand the ironing heat, so
they should be metal, not plastic.

3) MAKE AN **ETCHED** VANITY PLATE.
Carefully clean the vanity plate and ensure that it is dry.
Using a Laser Printer, print a MIRROR image to DynaArt Toner
Transfer paper. Use an iron to transfer the toner image to the
vanity plate. Soak the vanity plate in water until the transfer
paper floats away from the plate. Rinse carefully under cold
running water.

Dip the vanity plate in acid. Keep the plate moving.
An alternative method is to "paint" acid/etchant onto the
vanity plate using a broad brush (one that is not affected
by the etchant, obviously!)  Once the acid/etchant has
changed the surface characteristics the desired amount,
remove the vanity plate and rigorously rinse the plate clean.
Remove the toner using Acetone or finger nail polish remover.
Where the toner once was the surface should be smooth and
shiny, whereas the etched metal will have a duller complexion.

Vanity plate must be metallic.

4) MAKE A **PLATED** VANITY PLATE.
Carefully clean the vanity plate and ensure that it is dry.
Using a Laser Printer, print a MIRROR image to DynaArt Toner
Transfer paper. Use an iron to transfer the toner image to the
vanity plate. Soak the vanity plate in water until the transfer
paper floats away from the plate. Rinse carefully under cold
running water.

Plate the Vanity Plate with a metal of contrasting color.
When the plating is finished, remove the toner using Acetone
or finger nail polish remover. You will now have a two-tone
vanity plate.

Vanity plate must be metallic.

5) MAKE A **TRANSPARENT** OVERLAY.
Print a MIRRORED image using a Laser Printer. The print
material can be either transparent or matte finish on one
side. If using matte finish, print to the matte side.

There are some additional things you can do with this method.

A) After printing, spray the toner side. Metallic paints
look especially "cool", although a simple flat white is also
nice.

B) Print a MIRRORED and also NEGATIVE version of the lettering
onto the transparent/translucent material. The letters are now
CLEAR. You can individually apply color to the toner side and
the letters will take on that color. You can apply a few
simple "masks" that consist of cut-out areas and quickly
spray paint the desired color scheme to hundreds of overlays
in just a few minutes. -OR- print the color scheme onto paper
and apply the overlay on top of the paper. I have also used
paper that had one side "metallic". Use your imagination!

*** The overlay is normally applied to the case using spray-on
adhesive.

6) MAKE AN ADHESIVE PAPER PANEL.
The companies that make labels also sell full sheets of
paper that are adhesive-backed and can be printed on a Laser
Jet or Ink Jet. In color even! Great for quick prototypes.
I find the smooth paper better than the textured. The
thinner paper works better in many Laser Jets, since
thick paper prevents the toner from fusing (unless your
printer has an adjustment for thick paper).

Once the paper has been applied, you can give it a few
coats of clear lacquer or acrylic spray to increase its
lifespan. You could even apply a clear transparency material
if you want.


***
I hope someone finds this useful.

Fr. Tom McGahee

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2001\07\31@174538 by steve

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> This an excellent method (I use it myself!). I would just like to add
> that you can spray white enamel paint onto the back of the label to
> make it look better, and double sided tape also works really well for
> sticking it down (or up, or wherever).

I used to do that too (but used poster paint as it dries faster and
doesn't make such a mess).
Now I layout what I want in full colour and take it up to the local
copy shop. They print it onto heavy stock, laminate it and cut to
size. All much faster and better than I can do it.

Steve.

======================================================
Steve Baldwin                Electronic Product Design
TLA Microsystems Ltd         Microcontroller Specialists
PO Box 15-680, New Lynn      http://www.tla.co.nz
Auckland, New Zealand        ph  +64 9 820-2221
email: @spam@stevebKILLspamspamtla.co.nz      fax +64 9 820-1929
======================================================

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2001\07\31@182415 by Brent Brown

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> > This an excellent method (I use it myself!). I would just like to add
> > that you can spray white enamel paint onto the back of the label to
> > make it look better, and double sided tape also works really well for
> > sticking it down (or up, or wherever).
>
> I used to do that too (but used poster paint as it dries faster and
> doesn't make such a mess).
> Now I layout what I want in full colour and take it up to the local
> copy shop. They print it onto heavy stock, laminate it and cut to
> size. All much faster and better than I can do it.
>

Do you take it there on disk or do you do a colour inkjet print out
first and get it copied? The laser print / enamel paint / transparency
has the advantages of being very rugged, waterproof and lightfast.
(Wish I had a colour laser!) Not too slow a procedure, just need to
be patient while the paint dries! An hour in the hot water cupboard is
enough.

Brent Brown
Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street
Hamilton, New Zealand
Ph/fax: +64 7 849 0069
Mobile/text: 025 334 069
eMail:  KILLspambrent.brownKILLspamspamclear.net.nz

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2001\07\31@182431 by Mike Kendall

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Years ago, I used a spray lacquer to cover up my artwork on a power supply
project.  It was very nice and neat looking, but I could not resist the
temptation to clean it with the best solvent I had at my disposal,
tri-clorofloroethane, it dissolved the lacquer and destroyed the artwork.
This solvent is very common in electronics and called tri-chlor.  I'm not
sure what else will dissolve the lacquer, but be careful of solvents and
lacquer coatings over electronic project artwork.
Regards,
Mike
{Original Message removed}

2001\07\31@182945 by Mike Kendall

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Years ago, I built a communications van and used the Brother labeling
machine to label stuff.  I was working around the clock and didn't have much
time to mess around.  A few months later they began curling off.  Apparantly
the labels do not always stick all that well to metal.
A tried and true method I've discovered to keep quick labels from unsticking
is to put a light coat of super glue (cyanocrylate) on the back of the
label.  If you have a painted surface it will literally chemically weld
itself on it.  I cannot remember if I used this trick or not on the Brother
label machine but have done it with the older plastic label guns.
Mike
{Original Message removed}

2001\07\31@193853 by steve

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> > Now I layout what I want in full colour
> > and take it up to the local copy shop. They print it onto heavy
> > stock, laminate it and cut to size. All much faster and better than
> > I can do it.
>
> Do you take it there on disk or do you do a colour inkjet print out
> first and get it copied? The laser print / enamel paint / transparency
> has the advantages of being very rugged, waterproof and lightfast.

I take a disk up as their laser can do a much better job than my
inkjet. I expect I could be up there and back with the finished item
before my clunky old inkjet would have finished printing the page.
The laminate is going to be just as rugged and the toner just as
lightfast (don't know about the paper though). Waterproof - true,
although I have some laminated paper that I take diving and that
has about 5mm of water ingress after a dozen dives and max depth
of 39m.

My main use for these techniques is for one-of prototypes for
clients, rather than a finish for a final product. It only has to last
long enough for them to get all excited about seeing a product with
blinking lights and their logo on it and being presented with the bill.

Another front panel method I haven't got round to trying yet is to get
it cut out on one of those gerber things the sign-writers use.
I'm not sure how small they can do but the colours would be nice
and bold.

Other methods are getting your PCB maker to put a silkscreen on
your front panel. They are setup to do it for PCB's already and the
one's here will do other stuff as well.

If you have a place locally that makes those name plates on office
doors by engraving/milling plastic laminate, they can do neat
panels too. They use a laminate that has an opaque, coloured
layer and a clear layer. They mill it in mirror form from the opaque
side and then put paint in the milled out letters, etc. Really good for
larger instruments and things like switchboards.

Steve.



======================================================
Steve Baldwin                Electronic Product Design
TLA Microsystems Ltd         Microcontroller Specialists
PO Box 15-680, New Lynn      http://www.tla.co.nz
Auckland, New Zealand        ph  +64 9 820-2221
email: RemoveMEstevebTakeThisOuTspamtla.co.nz      fax +64 9 820-1929
======================================================

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2001\07\31@213430 by Brent Brown

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{Quote hidden}

I have had a sign company to make some labels for a couple of
projects now. They took my Corel Draw file directly. Not sure of the
exact technology their printer uses but it does 300dpi, each colour
coming from a seperate roll of film. It does several passes, each
layer of vinyl being overlaid on top of the previous.

Costs were better than screenprinting for up to about 100 pieces.
Resolution is not too bad but the biggest problems are alignment
between colours and having to consider gaps between colours or
intentionally overlaying them. All in all a nice solution for small to
medium production runs.

Brent Brown
Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street
Hamilton, New Zealand
Ph/fax: +64 7 849 0069
Mobile/text: 025 334 069
eMail:  spamBeGonebrent.brownspamBeGonespamclear.net.nz

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2001\07\31@222709 by Dale Botkin

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On Tue, 31 Jul 2001, Mike Kendall wrote:

> Years ago, I built a communications van and used the Brother labeling
> machine to label stuff.  I was working around the clock and didn't have much
> time to mess around.  A few months later they began curling off.  Apparantly
> the labels do not always stick all that well to metal.

Especially textured or cold metal.  The adhesive on that tape is really
not all that great, in my experience.  I've stuck innumerable yards to
Cisco, Sun, and ham radio equipment...  some sticks, some doesn't.  Your
best bet is unpainted, brush finished metal.  The more textured the paint
the quicker it will fall off.

Dale
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'[OT]: How to print words on enclosure box?'
2001\08\01@005314 by Brian Kraut
picon face
I have been silk screening mine.  That is the ultimate quality, but not the
easiest to do if you don't have the experience and equipment.

I have an inkjet printer that I have been planning on modifying to move the
printer head over a work holding fixture instead of moving the paper under the
head.  That way you position whatever you want under the head and print
directly on it.  Most likely you would need to experiment with different inks
to work on different surfaces.  Has anyone else tried this?

Barry Gershenfeld wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\08\01@065014 by Alan B. Pearce

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>There is some nice spray stuff you can buy in art stores that will do the
>trick (don't have a can right in front of me, I think it's actually
acrylic),
>but the dry transfer lettering is getting scarce.

take it down it your friendly hairdresser for a spray of hair lacquer?

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2001\08\01@113717 by Jeff DeMaagd

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----- Original Message -----
From: Brian Kraut <TakeThisOuTengaltEraseMEspamspam_OUTEARTHLINK.NET>


> I have been silk screening mine.  That is the ultimate quality, but not
the
> easiest to do if you don't have the experience and equipment.
>
> I have an inkjet printer that I have been planning on modifying to move
the
> printer head over a work holding fixture instead of moving the paper under
the
> head.  That way you position whatever you want under the head and print
> directly on it.  Most likely you would need to experiment with different
inks
> to work on different surfaces.  Has anyone else tried this?

How do you intend to seal this?  Wither the piece needs to be treated or you
need to put some sort of coating on it.  I think most ink for ink jets are
intended for porous surfaces, such as paper.  Even printer transparences
have a treatment on them to react & bond the ink to the surface.

Jeff

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2001\08\01@140436 by Peter L. Peres

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If the box is metal you can use a plastic stencil and an acid pen. Very
*very* permanent. The stencil can be made using silk screen technology.

Peter

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2001\08\02@034849 by Vasile Surducan

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We do it with a a printer. You know, a printer is:

A joke in poor taste.    A printer consists of three main parts: the
case, the jammed paper tray and the blinking light. [grin]

All the best, Vasile



On Tue, 31 Jul 2001, Nicolas Fournel wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\08\04@123256 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza

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>looking I'll use a laminated tape labeling machine.
>Mine is the PT-310 from Brother (see
>http://www.brother.com/usa/common/walkthrough/office/office_label.html),
>they support different fonts, as well as have
>different colored text and backgrounds depending on
>the tape used.

       And it erases itself with time ;o) Kind of "self destruct" label ;o)))


---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

Alexandre Souza
taitoEraseMEspam.....terra.com.br
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2001\08\06@014831 by dr. Imre Bartfai

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Hi,

I do not agree. I have another low-priced Brother label printer, and I
have a label directly on the street for five years. Looks like new.

Regards,
Imre


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On Sat, 4 Aug 2001, Alexandre Domingos F. Souza wrote:

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