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'[OT]: High temperture sensor'
2001\05\15@101032 by aipi Wijnbergen

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Hi friends,


For my next project I need to measure high temperatures.

LM35 goes only up to 150 Degrees Celsius.

I do not know exactly how much temperature range I need, I know that the
heat source is working in pulses and if it is used too much then hot glue
and solder near it would melt. I am thinking that if I'll add a temperature
sensor that would start a fan then I would not get to that melting point.

Can anyone point me to a stronger device please.

Thanks Chaipi

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2001\05\15@102917 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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Semiconductor based temperature sensors are pretty much limited to a max of
around 150C.  If you need high temperature measurement there are only two
real methods AFAIK: Platinum resistance, and Thermocouple.  Neither are as
easy to use as e.g. an LM35, but there are lots of application notes on
using Thermocouples if you have a hunt on a search engine such as Google.
Thermocouples can measure many hundreds of degree's C.

Mike

> {Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@114654 by Lawrence Lile

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Glass Encapsulated Thermistors are good to 250C, and cheap. Thermocouples
and RTD's can go much higher - to thousands of degrees in some cases.  If
you need precision, thermocouples or Platinum RTD's are your best choices.
Platinum RTD's are very well behaved, linear devices but need some special
circuitry to limit self-heating, and they require 3-wire or 4-wire
resistance measurement.  They are very low ohm values, and therefore the
wires themselves contaminate the temperature signal.  RTD's are well
behaved, linear, but very expensive.

Thermistors are nonlinear, and sometimes low precision.

Therocouples are finicky and cantankerous, millivolt level signal sources.
while you CAN build a thermocouple reader from off-the-shelf chips, it is
best to get commercially designed and calibrated thermocouple amplifiers if
you can afford them.  They are also nonlinear, and require special materials
like iron and constantan terminal blocks.  I use them every day, but they
are not for the faint-hearted.



You can find all the info you ever wanted from OMEGA   http://www.omega.com
1-800-TC-Omega they have a lot of good technical info, a good website, and
people waiting around just to explain this stuff to you.  THey sell RTD's
and Thermocouples, among other things.

THermistors can be bought through mouser or digikey  http://www.digikey.com
although a US$0.15 thermistor will be US$4.00 in Digikey, for some reason.


Lawrence Lile

{Original Message removed}

2001\05\15@194002 by Herbert Graf

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> For my next project I need to measure high temperatures.
>
> LM35 goes only up to 150 Degrees Celsius.
>
> I do not know exactly how much temperature range I need, I know that the
> heat source is working in pulses and if it is used too much then hot glue
> and solder near it would melt. I am thinking that if I'll add a
> temperature
> sensor that would start a fan then I would not get to that melting point.

       Generally at temperatures above what silicon based sensors can handle you
enter the world of thermo couples. They consist of two pieces of metal
bonded together and can handle very high temperatures. TTYL

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2001\05\16@151046 by Peter L. Peres

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Use a RTD. Make sure you get one with the right shape because you can't
use solder to attach the wires near the heat source.

Peter

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