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'[OT]: Good EE colleges'
2003\03\19@103106 by Robert Ussery

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Hello, PIClisters...

As a high-school junior, I'm swimming in the sea of college solicitations propaganda. I received a 222 (99th percentile) on my PSAT test, so I assume I'm probably a candidate for the better colleges. I'm trying to weed out the colleges that, while they claim they're a good engineering college (as almost all of them do), are pretty worthless.
At the risk of starting a flame war, which schools do y'all think are the best for electrical engineering, with a possibility for aerospace engineering (I'm interested in designing aerial robots and avionics for a living :^)  )?
TIA!

- Robert




P.S., this is a repost; I don't think it posted the first time. Sorry if you get two copies...

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2003\03\19@104727 by Madhu Annapragada

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Caltech...woohoooo...
but then come to think of it I learnt more in my basement trying to answer
the question what if and why not...with a soldering iron and a copy of
Horowitz and Hill.
Madhu

{Original Message removed}

2003\03\19@111908 by Lawrence Lile

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MIT definitely.  Try to find a scholarship.

Meanwhile, look for internships, build stuff, and do anything you can to
develop your skills outside of school.  Most schools, even good ones, do
not give you enough  hands on experience.  Several of my jobs sprang
directly from hobbies.

Don't race through school.  Take five or six years to complete a four year
degree, it is less stressful that way and your grades will be better. Take
summers off, do something interesting.  Take a year off, and bum around
Europe or volunteer on an archeological dig or get hired as a janitor at
the South Pole Station or work on a research ship or join the peace corps
or do something else outrageous.  This accomplishes several things:  It
tests your mettle, makes you a more interesting conversationalist, and
makes peoples eyes bug out when reading your resume.

When in school, find a really inspiring professor, and get them to hire
you to do something wierd and interesting.  I passed up a chance to work
on electric vehicles with a great professor and have kicked myself ever
since.

Meanwhile, as soon as you figure out a professor is a jerk, dump his
classes and take them from someone else.

-- Lawrence Lile





Robert Ussery <spam_OUTuavscienceTakeThisOuTspamFRII.COM>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
03/19/2003 09:29 AM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
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       Subject:        [OT]: Good EE colleges


Hello, PIClisters...

As a high-school junior, I'm swimming in the sea of college solicitations
propaganda. I received a 222 (99th percentile) on my PSAT test, so I
assume I'm probably a candidate for the better colleges. I'm trying to
weed out the colleges that, while they claim they're a good engineering
college (as almost all of them do), are pretty worthless.
At the risk of starting a flame war, which schools do y'all think are the
best for electrical engineering, with a possibility for aerospace
engineering (I'm interested in designing aerial robots and avionics for a
living :^)  )?
TIA!

- Robert




P.S., this is a repost; I don't think it posted the first time. Sorry if
you get two copies...

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2003\03\19@121949 by Eric Schlaepfer

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Hi Robert,

What are you looking for in an engineering program?  Someone already
suggested Caltech, which is a great school if you are really into the
mathematics behind engineering.  However, if you are like me and you
really enjoy the practical side of engineering, you should consider Cal
Poly in San Luis Obispo. Check out the website at http://www.calpoly.edu
for more info.

If you're into robotics, we have a Mechatronics concentration of our
Mechanical Engineering program, so you might want to look into that also.

Later,

Eric

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2003\03\19@140332 by M. Adam Davis

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The University of Michigan is in the top five of schools you could
attend for both aerospace and electrical engineering.
US News and World Report has a yearly college ranking.  I don't know
when they publish it, but the top five in any category are listed here
for engineering:
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/college/rankings/rankengineering_brief.php

Note that there are listings for those schools that also perform
doctorate work and those that do not.  If you aren't looking at anything
past a BE, then you have more choices - or attend one for the BE, and by
that time you'll have a better idea of what's available for your
master's or further.

I'm currently attending the University of Michigan (Computer
Engineering), and I can certianly vouch for the program.

Of course, they'd better be in the top five if they are going to charge
*in-state* students 8k a year just for tuition.  :-(

-Adam

Robert Ussery wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2003\03\20@035850 by William Chops Westfield

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   >As a high-school junior, I'm swimming in the sea of college
   solicitations propaganda. I received a 222 (99th percentile) on my
   PSAT test, so I assume I'm probably a candidate for the better
   colleges. I'm trying to weed out the colleges that, while they claim
   they're a good engineering college (as almost all of them do), are
   pretty worthless.

There's a very wide range of "not worthless" when it comes to EE.  "Good"
undergrad EE programs tend to be very theoretical, and not much in the way
of "how to build useful devices with a PIC microcontroller."  Theory is
good, but you can miss out on practice as well.  In my (Ivy league) EE
program, we learned how the internals of a 555 timer worked.  The class
that learned how to make neat circuits with a 555 was a CHEMISTRY class
about lab instrumentation (they got to use Lancaster's "cookbooks" for
texts!)


   At the risk of starting a flame war, which schools do y'all think are
   the best for electrical engineering, with a possibility for aerospace
   engineering (I'm interested in designing aerial robots and avionics
   for a living :^) )?

A lot of EE is "support engineering" - you do an awful lot of "engineering"
based on not very much in the way of education.  A "good EE" program is
more likely to prepare you for EE-specific things like chip design, a
masters degree in EE, or teaching EE.  If you're really interested in
aerial robots and avionics, I would start looking for the best schools in
aerospace engineering, which are highly likely to have "good enough" EE
programs alongside.

I'll second the idea that getting involved in projects outside the
classrooms is particularly important.  Either at school, or for your summer
jobs (look for summer jobs that are in your career path, not the ones that
are most convenient or pay best...)

BillW "All that calculus, wasted on a software engineer."

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