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'[OT]: Futile attempts to avoid further Darwin awar'
2007\01\06@072309 by Peter P.

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http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/01/06/wacky.warnings.ap/index.html

Shouldn't it say something like 'don't put any firemen in the machine' ?

Peter


2007\01\06@123238 by Piclist

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face
It's too bad that it has come to this. The sticker in the washer is
explained by some lady who says that the front loading doors are the at
the right height for a 4 year old to get in, so the stickers are a
necessary.  Now I ask the question, what 4 year old is going to read the
sticker and go "hmmmmm, I think they have a point," turn around and go
play somewhere else?  Once again, it comes down to lawyers =)


-Mario

-----Original Message-----
From: spam_OUTpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu] On Behalf
Of Peter P.
Sent: Saturday, January 06, 2007 7:23 AM
To: piclistspamKILLspammit.edu
Subject: [OT]: Futile attempts to avoid further Darwin awards



http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/01/06/wacky.warnings.ap/index.html

Shouldn't it say something like 'don't put any firemen in the machine' ?

Peter


2007\01\06@125358 by David VanHorn

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WARNING:  Do NOT eat warning sticker.

2007\01\06@152802 by Jinx

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> WARNING:  Do NOT eat warning sticker.

Oh, don't get me started on sticker poisoning......

You can imagine this being voiced by The Simpsons' Comic
Book Guy

"Please do not use this directory while operating a moving
vehicle. Thank you. Nathan Keener of Tacoma Washington,
I'm looking in your direction. On a scale of 1 to 10, I rate this
book a 1. Worst character development. Ever"

It must be terribly frustrating as a US business owner to have
to protect yourself from people with no common sense. There's
a pretty high tolerance for accidental and misadventure verdicts
in NZ. If a company genuinely has been negligent they'll get
pinged for it, and civil damages claims or vexatious sueing is
not common

Case in point, no one even thought of going after anyone -

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10417839

Victim's mother said the other day "It's just boys being boys"

2007\01\06@163032 by Bob Barr

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On Sun, 07 Jan 2007 09:27:54 +1300, Jinx <.....joecolquittKILLspamspam.....clear.net.nz>
wrote:

>> WARNING:  Do NOT eat warning sticker.
>
>Oh, don't get me started on sticker poisoning......
>
>You can imagine this being voiced by The Simpsons' Comic
>Book Guy
>
>"Please do not use this directory while operating a moving
>vehicle. Thank you. Nathan Keener of Tacoma Washington,
>I'm looking in your direction. On a scale of 1 to 10, I rate this
>book a 1. Worst character development. Ever"
>

On the other hand, it *does* have quite a large cast of characters to
make up for that failing. :=)


Regards, Bob

2007\01\07@025549 by James Newtons Massmind

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techref.massmind.org/techref/legalese.htm

---
James.


2007\01\07@052752 by Walter Banks

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While doing some research on a talk I gave on frivolous lawsuits I ran
across a case of two guys with a hedge to trim who decided that the problem
was to hard to solve with manual trimmers.
The two gentlemen decided that they needed to find some other approach to
the problem. Such things take a lot of thought and so they sat down with a
box of some local brewers finest and sure enough at the end of the box a
solution was found. They would fire up a 25 year old lawnmower lift it up
and walk down the hedge simple as mowing your lawn they reasoned. 6 feet
into the walk one of the gentlemen tripped and one of them lost a couple
fingers. They were awarded $30K because the old lawnmower was not labeled
against operating in that manner.

w..

"Peter P." wrote:

> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/01/06/wacky.warnings.ap/index.html
>
> Shouldn't it say something like 'don't put any firemen in the machine' ?
>
> Peter
>
> -

2007\01\09@115457 by Peter P.

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David VanHorn <dvanhorn <at> microbrix.com> writes:

> WARNING:  Do NOT eat warning sticker.

Speaking of eating stickers, imho the stickers on fruit (like apples) from the
supermarket must be wholesome and very healthy, as well as pretty much
impossible to remove. Of course I cannot always be bothered to check if they're
still on when I pick a fruit to eat in the dark. While certain toy magnets cause
trouble (like killing children who swallow them), these labels seem to be
nutritious ...

So the technical question is, how are users supposed to get them off. Obviously
water does not work, fruit are 'wet' all the time and that won't do. So, knowing
the breadth of the expertise of this list's members, what in g'd's name does one
use to wash the labels off stopping short of a peeling knife ?! Are they meant
to be edible ? (I have a doubt, the glue is unbelivably strong - it even sticks
to oranges and citrus fruits which have wax and citrus oil - the
remove-everything-cleaner - on their rinds). I wish I could buy labels that
strong for labelling chips and small parts - but I can't.

Peter


2007\01\09@180021 by Richard Prosser

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I don't know the answer but we pulled one out of a can of apples the
other day so I guess the canneries have the same problem.

RP

On 10/01/07, Peter P. <EraseMEplpeter2006spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTyahoo.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\01\09@232013 by Jinx

face picon face

> WARNING:  Do NOT eat warning sticker

The days of picking little stickers off fruit and veges may soon be over

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/print.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10352393


2007\01\09@232122 by Jinx

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> WARNING:  Do NOT eat warning sticker

The days of picking little stickers off fruit and veges may soon be over

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/print.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10352393


2007\01\09@235047 by Herbert Graf

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On Wed, 2007-01-10 at 17:20 +1300, Jinx wrote:
> > WARNING:  Do NOT eat warning sticker
>
> The days of picking little stickers off fruit and veges may soon be over
>
> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/print.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10352393

Neat, again, one of those ideas that seems SO obvious (after someone
comes up with it of course!), why didn't we all think of it...

TTYL

2007\01\10@030333 by Cris Wilson

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>> So the technical question is, how are users supposed to get them off.
>> Obviously
>> water does not work, fruit are 'wet' all the time and that won't do. So,
>> knowing
>> the breadth of the expertise of this list's members, what in g'd's name
>> does one
>> use to wash the labels off stopping short of a peeling knife ?! Are they
>> meant
>> to be edible ? (I have a doubt, the glue is unbelivably strong - it even
>> sticks
>> to oranges and citrus fruits which have wax and citrus oil - the
>> remove-everything-cleaner - on their rinds). I wish I could buy labels
>> that
>> strong for labelling chips and small parts - but I can't.

The glue is a food grade adhesive and is very much like the
glue on the back of postage stamps (the kind you lick).

As for removal, warm water is recommended by the fruit people.
Alcohol and vegetable oil also work well.
Acetone, WD-40, and ammonia work well for getting them off of
your skin, but I think I'd rather eat the sticker than those
solvents.

For labeling small parts with labels I use a Scotch glue tape
reel. It's usually sold with the scrapbooking craft stuff and
is in a purple dispenser that looks somewhat like a roll of tape.

--
Cris Wilson
Information Resource Consultant
College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities
Clemson University
crisspamspam_OUTclemson.edu
Report problems to: @spam@aah_computersKILLspamspamclemson.edu


2007\01\10@111724 by Peter P.

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Herbert Graf <mailinglist3 <at> farcite.net> writes:

> On Wed, 2007-01-10 at 17:20 +1300, Jinx wrote:
> > > WARNING:  Do NOT eat warning sticker
> >
> > The days of picking little stickers off fruit and veges may soon be over
> >
> > www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/print.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10352393
>
> Neat, again, one of those ideas that seems SO obvious (after someone
> comes up with it of course!), why didn't we all think of it...

Actually I was thinking of inkjet printing using wax ink. Eggs are marked like
this already and they are not that smooth. no problems there so far. I also saw
certain meats marked like this (directly on the meat, with some sort of edible
ink).

Peter P.


2007\01\10@120914 by Philip Pemberton

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James Newtons Massmind wrote:
> http://techref.massmind.org/techref/legalese.htm

That's nothing. Some HP engineers hid a disclaimer on the ASPEN signal
processing chip used in some HP oscilloscopes:
<http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/creatures/pages/disclaimer.html>

And here's what appears to be the original disclaimer in text format:
<www.arcarmichael.com/ultimatedisclaimer.htm>
Well some of the text is in the right place, anyway...

--
Phil.                         |  (\_/)  This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny
KILLspampiclistKILLspamspamphilpem.me.uk         | (='.'=) into your signature to help him gain
http://www.philpem.me.uk/     | (")_(") world domination.

2007\01\10@130019 by Howard Winter

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flavicon
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 03:03:31 -0500 (EST), Cris Wilson wrote:

>...
> The glue is a food grade adhesive and is very much like the
> glue on the back of postage stamps (the kind you lick).

Actually that's "gum", which has to be wetted to work (lick it if you like - I've seen it being made so I don't any more! :-)  "Glue" is self-adhesive
without wetting.

> As for removal, warm water is recommended by the fruit people.
> Alcohol and vegetable oil also work well.
> Acetone, WD-40, and ammonia work well for getting them off of
> your skin, but I think I'd rather eat the sticker than those
> solvents.

I can only assume they use different stuff over there, because I find this puzzling.  Labels on fruit over here peel off *really* easily, without leaving
any residue.  I just tried it on an apple (an Egremont Russett, as it happens) where after a couple of chips with a thumbnail to lift the edge, it came
straight off with no problem and even under a magnifying glass there's no sign of glue left on the surface, and no "tack" where the label was.

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2007\01\10@223349 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Jan 10, 2007, at 9:59 AM, Howard Winter wrote:

> I can only assume they use different stuff over there,

Yeah.  Here in California, the labels seem to have real glue
that is easily peelable and NOT water-based.  In fact, it seems
like getting the label wet is the worst thing you can do, as it
causes the layers of paper to separate (cheap paper, I guess),
leaving a dot of glue fuzzy with paper remains on the fruit, and
a bit of soggy paper in your hand.  It's MUCH easier to get the
label off when it and the fruit are both dry.

BillW

2007\01\11@041201 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/01/06/wacky.warnings.ap/index.html
>
> Shouldn't it say something like 'don't put any firemen in the machine' ?

Maybe everyone should have a copy of this book ...

www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0446696560/ref=nosim/isbnat

2007\01\11@161644 by David VanHorn

picon face
This came today, on the spec for a single cell li-poly that I will be using
in a project:

I especially like the part about the "first wife" charger...
And why would anyone EVER connect a 3V battery to a 110 outlet directly?


The battery will catch on fire, explode or leak if item described below was
not strictly observed.

●    Do not throw the battery into water or moisten the battery.

●    Do not use or store battery near calorific source such as fire and
heater.

●    Please use the first wife charger.

●    Do not connect the terminals of battery by the wrong way.

●    Do not connect the terminals of battery to an electrical outlet
directly.

●    Do not throw the battery into fire or heating the battery.

●    Do not short circuit the battery's terminals with wireless or metal.
Prevent storage or transport the battery with necklace, barrette or other
metal object together.

●    Avoid impact, throwing, bending, twisting, mechanical shock from
battery.

●    Prevent piercing the case of battery with sharp edge such as pin,
needle. Do not hammering, trampling battery.

●    Prevent soldering the terminals of battery directly.

●    Never disassembling the battery in any way.

●    Prevent charging the battery in high temperature or near fire.



The battery may lead to electrolyte leakage, fire, or explosion if not
allowed strictly.

●    Please do not put the battery in microwave or pressure.

●    Do not mix use KMB battery with primary battery (such as dry battery)
or different performance together.

●    Do not use battery when the battery smells peculiarly, exhaling
caloric, distorted, turn colors or appeared any abnormities. Take off the
battery from the equipment or charger immediately if the battery is using or
charging.

●    Keep all batteries out of the reach of little children. Consult a
doctor immediately if a battery is swallowed.

●    If battery leaking out electrolyte or smelling peculiarly, take it away
from a fire, electrolyte may cause   fire or bum.

●    If electrolyte was dropped into eyes, do not wipe, please wash with
clear water and consult a doctor immediately, or the eyes maybe harmed.

2007\01\11@171757 by James Newtons Massmind

face picon face

They missed a few:

- Do not place in thermonuclear device while producing more than 1MW output.

- Do not operating on surface of the sun.

- Not safe for insertion in rectum.

---
James.



> {Original Message removed}

2007\01\11@172045 by Bob Axtell

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David VanHorn wrote:
{Quote hidden}

That about covers it. Thanks for sharing!

--Bob

2007\01\11@193607 by William Couture

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I prefer the "generic" warning:

- This product is not for use by stupid people.  If you find a way to
abuse this
  product and hurt yourself in a way that nobody has though of before, we
  cannot be held responsible.

Bill

On 1/11/07, James Newtons Massmind <RemoveMEjamesnewtonTakeThisOuTspammassmind.org> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

2007\01\12@024157 by Peter P.

picon face
David VanHorn <dvanhorn <at> microbrix.com> writes:

>
> This came today, on the spec for a single cell li-poly that I will be using
> in a project:
>
> I especially like the part about the "first wife" charger...
> And why would anyone EVER connect a 3V battery to a 110 outlet directly?

If you read between the lines, that is practical advice, likely gained from
experience. The details about necklaces and eye damage are fascniating, just
like the advice against charging directly with 110V. This even indicates that
the Darwin award attempt occured in a 110V country. I presume that they would
have written 'do not charge with 220V' otherwise.

Peter P.



2007\01\12@211352 by Chris McSweeny

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Could probably just shorten that to the first sentence and it would be
adequate - would ensure that any lawsuit by somebody doing something stupid
failed. Unfortunately I'm guessing it would also be deemed to be an unfair
contract term!

On 1/12/07, William Couture <spamBeGonebcouturespamBeGonespamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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