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'[OT]: Electronic Warfare'
2002\05\19@003505 by T.C. Phelps

picon face
Ah, the art of getting even. As Elvira once said,
"Revenge is better than Christmas."

> Aim giant speakers in his direction and play Barbara

> Streisand.  This of course, I learned from "South
> Park". :-)

A Yoko Ono box set was released within the past couple
years or so. That would also be a good choice. :)

Or how about borrowing someone's nice big subwoofer?
Put it right against the wall to his apartment, and
crank Barry White, Chemical Brothers, or some nice
bassy tunes. The vibrations will probably cause lots
of havoc with anything he's got hanging on his wall in
addition to being a huge nuisance. If he talks to YOU
about it, say you're sorry, just got a new subwoofer
and you got carried away etc... then when he is a jerk
and plays loud music play your "seismic" weapon and if
he comes and talks to you say you're sorry again but
his music was wafting through and you can't stand
<whatever he's playing> and you had to put your own
stereo on. Do that enough times and maybe he'll get
the hint.


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2002\05\19@152405 by Dale Botkin

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face
There's an even more elegant solution if you're lookig for a seismic event
generator.  I saw a catalog listing "Bass Shakers", which are apparently a
low-frequency, high-mass device that you bolt to the floor joists from
below to turn your floor or furniture into a giant subwoofer.  I'm sure
they would work just as well bolted to a wall stud.

Dale
--
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curiosity killed the cat, I say only the cat died nobly."
         - Arnold Edinborough


On Sat, 18 May 2002, T.C. Phelps wrote:

> Or how about borrowing someone's nice big subwoofer?

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2002\05\20@051542 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>Or how about borrowing someone's nice big subwoofer?
>Put it right against the wall to his apartment, and
>crank Barry White, Chemical Brothers, or some nice
>bassy tunes. The vibrations will probably cause lots
>of havoc with anything he's got hanging on his wall in
>addition to being a huge nuisance. If he talks to YOU
>about it, say you're sorry, just got a new subwoofer
>and you got carried away etc... then when he is a jerk
>and plays loud music play your "seismic" weapon and if
>he comes and talks to you say you're sorry again but
>his music was wafting through and you can't stand
><whatever he's playing> and you had to put your own
>stereo on. Do that enough times and maybe he'll get
>the hint.

I heard of someone who built himself a nice big woofer, and on testing it
found the resonant frequency a bit higher than he wished for. Reasoning that
the problem was the compliance of the speaker diaphragm support he figured
he would loosen it up by letting it run for a few hours at high power. Sets
of to work early in the morning leaving the speaker driven with considerable
number of watts at about 10Hz. Arrives home in the evening to find the
neighbours just about climbing the walls with madness at the continuous
sub-sonic high power levels.

It worked though, the resonant frequency dropped to the desired figure.

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2002\05\20@054714 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I favor the Amateur Radio approach myself.  There
>are many advantages to this method, a few have
>already been mentioned by another lister.  In the US
>having an amateur license is like having a federal
>license to kill (or otherwise interfere with)
>electronic equipment (outside of medical devices
>of course).


Another advantage of this approach is to have an imaginary conversation with
"someone on the other end of the radio link". You then tell this imaginary
person that you have been kept awake by this clown playing loud music next
door, so you figured that as you are now awake you figured you may as well
fire up the rig and make some more DX contacts.

Course you use AM mode for all these transmissions so his amp demodulates it
into plain text in his speakers :)

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2002\05\20@115726 by Jinx

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> A Yoko Ono box set was released within the past couple
> years or so. That would also be a good choice. :)

Ooooh, now that's just plain vicious. They'd have to be
throwing garbage over the fence as well to deserve that

Then again, how about that solo album ex-Sex Pistol
Sid Viscous did. It's even more pitiful because he was
at least trying to stay in tune

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2002\05\20@140625 by T.C. Phelps

picon face
> Sets of to work early in the morning leaving the
> speaker driven with considerable number of watts at
> about 10Hz. Arrives home in the evening to find the
> neighbours just about climbing the walls with
> madness at the continuous sub-sonic high power
> levels.

Ha! That's hilarious. Not too surprising though, and
still preferable to putting Yoko Ono or Sid Vicious'
solo album on. :)

Got another subsonics story for you. I have an old
copy of Borland Turbo C++ 3, and if you look for
sound() in the help file it provides this little tale:


  True story: 7 Hz is the resonant
  frequency of a chicken's skull cavity.
  This was determined empirically in
  Australia, where a new factory
  generating 7-Hz tones was located too
  close to a chicken ranch: When the
  factory started up, all the chickens
  died.

Some Internet sources attribute it as an urban legend,
but it's amusing nonetheless. At any rate I suppose
listening to a subwoofer put out 10 Hz all day is like
living next to a factory!

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2002\05\20@141958 by Rex Byrns

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A buddy of mine was nearly kicked out of his dorm when we made a 3 ft Tesla
coil and mounted an antennae made up of circles (one inside the other with
small gaps alternating top and bottom)  I don't think there was any operable
TV's or radio's for several blocks.  The antennae was from a patent we found
call the Multi Wave Oscillator.  A guy named Lachowsky invented it.  It
creates harmonics of everything.

Of course the discharge into a ceiling light socket also killed a 4 ton  AC
compressor... bware of backfires.

{Original Message removed}

2002\05\20@145225 by Tal (Zapta)

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face
> Of course the discharge into a ceiling light socket also killed a
> 4 ton  AC
> compressor... bware of backfires.

Or pace makers ....

Tal

> {Original Message removed}

2002\05\20@152324 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Mon, 20 May 2002, T.C. Phelps wrote:

{Quote hidden}

There are places in shopping malls and factories and such where dodgy
acoustics cause the infrasound from the A/C ducts to sum. Standing there
is a very unnerving experience, especially for people who don't know what
is up. You get a free diaphragm massage (it is said that too much of this
will have people running for the loo). The pressure level on one I know is
high enough that it makes a sheet of paper held loosely between two hands
flap with several mm of amplitude. Normal hearing is affected (normal
sounds sound strangely modulated - probably infrasound overloading the
cochlea). No ducts are obvious anywhere near it.  It's just the focus of a
natural lens in the building.

Peter

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2002\05\20@153911 by Eoin Ross

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face
I car I used to own had a sunroof you could remove - when it was like that there was an oscillation at 40 - 60 kph where your hair would bounce and the radio sounded like in was being played underwater - most unnerving for passengers that hadn't experienced it.
<snip><quote>
There are places in shopping malls and factories and such where dodgy
acoustics cause the infra sound from the A/C ducts to sum. Standing there
is a very unnerving experience, especially for people who don't know what
is up. You get a free diaphragm massage (it is said that too much of this
will have people running for the loo). The pressure level on one I know is
high enough that it makes a sheet of paper held loosely between two hands
flap with several mm of amplitude. Normal hearing is affected (normal
sounds sound strangely modulated - probably infra sound overloading the
cochlea). No ducts are obvious anywhere near it.  It's just the focus of a
natural lens in the building.

Peter
</quote>

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2002\05\20@154737 by Pic Dude

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face
Wouldn't happen to be the same 1987-1988-style Acura
integra that that that to me would it?  The whole
car would resonate and got louder until I slowed down.
Adding the "clip-on" wind-deflector would eliminate
it though.



{Original Message removed}

2002\05\20@170151 by Andrew Hooper

flavicon
face
I have been partially following this item, and there are some
really sick and vindictive people out there :).

If these people are really getting on your nerves why not
build and IR or RF switch. In NZ the main power feed and
meter box is located outside the house :)
Hook up a big fat relay and turn their power on and off for
them :).
I did this manually some years back when the people next
door decided to have a party that lasted until 4AM, actually
it was a little nastier, I pulled out ALL the fuses and left them
in their mailbox.

Andrew

{Original Message removed}

2002\05\20@192342 by Mike Browne

flavicon
face
And you call the previous posters sick and vindictive. Good move though, too
bad it isn't like that here in the states, I can think of two neighbors I've
had that I would have done that to.

{Original Message removed}

2002\05\20@193749 by Michael Johnston

flavicon
face
Here in the US there are serveral retailers nation wide that sell linear
amps for cb raidos get you a cb rig and antenna and amp set it up and start
talking when the jerk is home. I cant tell you how many times over the years
i had this happen to me i be playing music and boom I hear "breaker One
Nine" it was my neighbor . He did stay around long because i think he was
turned into the fcc. Mike Johnston
{Original Message removed}

2002\05\20@194756 by Jim

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face
  "Good move though, too bad it isn't like that
   here in the states"

Pull the meter maybe?

Jim


----- Original Message -----
From: "Mike Browne" <@spam@MBrowneKILLspamspamBURSTEINLABS.COM>
To: <KILLspamPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2002 6:19 PM
Subject: Re: [OT]: Electronic Warfare


> And you call the previous posters sick and vindictive. Good move though,
too
> bad it isn't like that here in the states, I can think of two neighbors
I've
> had that I would have done that to.
>
> {Original Message removed}

2002\05\20@200530 by Pic Dude

flavicon
face
So at this point, a lot of workable options are available --
pain-field generators, audio annoyers, devices to mess with
the neighbor's audio, electricals, etc.  But what are the
laws like out there?  Here in the US, doing most of this
would get the "victim" in trouble, and I'm sure that's
something you want to avoid.  How about some feedback on
what the "limits" are?

Cheers,
-Neil.



{Original Message removed}

2002\05\20@203010 by Jeff DeMaagd

picon face
In the States I think people can be fined for disturbing the peace,
particularly within city or town limits.  That's what is often used for
breaking up roudy parties and stopping anything that is louder than what
statute allows.

Jeff

----- Original Message -----
From: Jim <RemoveMEjvpollTakeThisOuTspamDALLAS.NET>


>    "Good move though, too bad it isn't like that
>     here in the states"
>
> Pull the meter maybe?

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2002\05\21@123309 by Cris Wilson

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In theory, the "victim" would be in trouble.
In the case of the neighbor I had troubles with, I asked him first
several times to stop playing music that loud at all hours of night.
When that failed, I asked the police to talk to him about noise
ordinance violations. They did. He asked who called the problem in
and they had to tell him that I did it. My windshield was mysteriously
busted out during the night by my neighbor. But I couldn't prove it, so
the police wouldn't do anything about it. And he continued to play his
music loud. So I resorted to altering his main breaker box.

So what are the legal limits? According to the police officer that I talked
to, I "couldn't legally do anything to interfere with my neighbor's personal
property, body, or communication systems. Or at least [I] shouldn't get
caught doing it." ;-)

And I now know that if you want to report a neighbor to the police,
do it from a pay phone and don't give your name.







At 07:03 PM 5/20/2002 -0500, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

2002\05\24@141456 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> There are places in shopping malls and factories and such where dodgy
> acoustics cause the infrasound from the A/C ducts to sum. Standing there


Used to live near a shunting yard.
Normally no problems.

In winter about ?4am they used to run up two diesel locos at once (maybe
more?) in an engine shed nearby. Presumably these were on governors set to
idle at the same speed. The multiple engines used to "beat" (possibly
resonating the building they were in) and produce a loud slow
woomp-a-woomp-a-woomp for about 15 minutes. Presumably they were warm after
that ?



       RM

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2002\05\24@151048 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
There is no end to infrasound tales. Most are myths but one I was involved
in was true. I was in a church with a friend who was playing the organ
(practising). I sat on the organ bench with him, on the left side, and I
casually pressed the two leftmost pedals down. For some seconds nothing
happened then I heard the stained glass in the nave windows begin to
'sing' and my friend pushed me off the bench... The church was empty, we
were kids, and he was the preacher's son and one of my best friends. The
sound that glass made was scary. I think that the beat frequency was some
0.5Hz or less. That organ was huge. I remember standing near the fan, it
was twice as tall as I was then. I think that with some experimenting we
could have brought the ceiling down too.

Peter

On Thu, 23 May 2002, Russell McMahon wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2002\05\24@173016 by Sean H. Breheny

face picon face
I don't get what the beat freq has to do with this. A beat shouldn't be
able to excite a resonance at the beat freq, unless there are significant
nonlinear mixing effects going on.

Sean

At 10:46 PM 5/24/2002 +0300, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2002\05\25@022532 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Fri, 24 May 2002, Sean H. Breheny wrote:

>I don't get what the beat freq has to do with this. A beat shouldn't be
>able to excite a resonance at the beat freq, unless there are significant
>nonlinear mixing effects going on.

I don't know either but windows usually don't close perfectly and have
some play, especially large tall church windows. Maybe this was the
'diode'. Anyway they took a few seconds to start 'singing'. I'm pretty
sure damage would have occured before too long (I did not intend to do any
damage - I was quite scared in fact).

Peter

{Quote hidden}

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2002\05\25@084746 by Russell McMahon

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> >I don't get what the beat freq has to do with this. A beat shouldn't be
> >able to excite a resonance at the beat freq, unless there are significant
> >nonlinear mixing effects going on.
>
> I don't know either but windows usually don't close perfectly and have
> some play, especially large tall church windows. Maybe this was the
> 'diode'. Anyway they took a few seconds to start 'singing'. I'm pretty
> sure damage would have occured before too long (I did not intend to do any
> damage - I was quite scared in fact).

I'm not sure that the electrical analogue applies fully here. Unlike EM
waves we are certain that there IS an "ether" in this case - the air is the
medium that the waves are produced in. When two such waves interact they are
represented by real pressure phenomena in the gas and "mixing" occurs at all
points.

In the case of my locomotive beating experience (which occurred
intermittently but on numerous occasions over the years that I lived there)
the effect was extremely real and manifestly repeatable. While I am not
CERTAIN that the effect was in fact caused by the two engines running side
by side at nominally identical rpm I can not think of a more probable
explanation. This only occurred in the early morning before (winter) dawn
and only for a limited period in each case. The "sound" levels were high and
they came from the shunting yard. I can imagine that the workers may even
have worked hard to produce the effect by careful idle speed adjustment :-).


       Russell McMahon

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2002\05\25@123038 by Dale Botkin

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On Sat, 25 May 2002, Peter L. Peres wrote:

> On Fri, 24 May 2002, Sean H. Breheny wrote:
>
> >I don't get what the beat freq has to do with this. A beat shouldn't be
> >able to excite a resonance at the beat freq, unless there are significant
> >nonlinear mixing effects going on.
>
> I don't know either but windows usually don't close perfectly and have
> some play, especially large tall church windows. Maybe this was the
> 'diode'. Anyway they took a few seconds to start 'singing'. I'm pretty
> sure damage would have occured before too long (I did not intend to do any
> damage - I was quite scared in fact).

Want my theory?  I'm thinking maybe it was like a tank circuit, or an old
spark gap transmitter.  The natural resonant frequency of the windows was
a harmonic of the beat frequency of the organ pipes, so the waves from the
orgam were enough to excite resonant oscillation in the windows - which
may well have self-destructed shortly.  Not exactly a transmitter, but
SOMEONE would have received a clear message...  8-)

Dale

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2002\05\25@142530 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Sat, 25 May 2002, Russell McMahon wrote:

>> >I don't get what the beat freq has to do with this. A beat shouldn't be
>> >able to excite a resonance at the beat freq, unless there are significant
>> >nonlinear mixing effects going on.
>>
>> I don't know either but windows usually don't close perfectly and have
>> some play, especially large tall church windows. Maybe this was the
>> 'diode'. Anyway they took a few seconds to start 'singing'. I'm pretty
>> sure damage would have occured before too long (I did not intend to do any
>> damage - I was quite scared in fact).
>
>I'm not sure that the electrical analogue applies fully here. Unlike EM
>waves we are certain that there IS an "ether" in this case - the air is the
>medium that the waves are produced in. When two such waves interact they are
>represented by real pressure phenomena in the gas and "mixing" occurs at all
>points.

My experience with mechanical harmonic oscillators is that nonlinear
events in the course of the motion cause harmonics. Example is guitar
string and incorrectly fastened fret (gives 'metal' sound liked by some =
lots of harmonics of the fundamental and some others caused by the
separately vibrating two sides of the chord - the metal fret becomes a
forced null for half the period of the fundamental).  Also two crystal
glasses pinged very close together so they touch will make weird sounds
(harmonics again).

In general a harmonic oscillator that can impact elastically on something
(by elastic I do not mean rubber - rather marble or solid steel) will make
a lot of harmonics. Think of the noise produced by fans, washing machines,
motors etc when their elastic mountings fail and allow them to touch their
bases intermittently.

>In the case of my locomotive beating experience (which occurred
>intermittently but on numerous occasions over the years that I lived there)
>the effect was extremely real and manifestly repeatable. While I am not
>CERTAIN that the effect was in fact caused by the two engines running side
>by side at nominally identical rpm I can not think of a more probable
>explanation. This only occurred in the early morning before (winter) dawn
>and only for a limited period in each case. The "sound" levels were high and
>they came from the shunting yard. I can imagine that the workers may even
>have worked hard to produce the effect by careful idle speed adjustment :-).

Peter

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