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'[OT]: Battery Corrosion and How to Get Rid of it?'
2001\11\07@170558 by Andrew E. Kalman

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Hi All.

I have some photographic equipment that has suffered from battery
leakage and corrosion (typically AA batteries that were left in
equipment for too long).

What's the best way to neutralize the acid and prevent any further corrosion?

Thanks,
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2001\11\07@171417 by James Paul

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Arm & Hammer Baking Soda.  Spread a generous amount on the area and
wait a few minutes.  Then brush it off into a container and toss it
in the trash.  I have used this method many times when repairing items
for customers who left batteries in equipment.

                                              Regards,

                                                Jim



{Quote hidden}

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2001\11\07@171559 by David VanHorn

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At 01:59 PM 11/7/01 -0700, Andrew E. Kalman wrote:
>Hi All.
>
>I have some photographic equipment that has suffered from battery
>leakage and corrosion (typically AA batteries that were left in
>equipment for too long).
>
>What's the best way to neutralize the acid and prevent any further corrosion?

Dissolve the gunk and move it away, using Q-tips and distilled water or
rubbing alcohol.
An ink eraser is a good tool to burninsh the contacts.
(dad spent 30 years repairing cameras, some things rubbed off..)

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2001\11\07@171821 by Alan Beeber

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The electrolyte in most common household batteries is KOH
(potassium hydroxide?). We used to use dilute boric acid
(don't know the dilution%) to clean contacts on battery test
equipment.  It did a fair job, but you can expect some
etching of metal. Look for hidden damage. The KOH released
from a venting cell will run like water into cracks and
along PCBs.


"Andrew E. Kalman" wrote:
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2001\11\07@183258 by Gennette, Bruce

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Battery Corrosion - How to Get Rid of it.

Scrape away large bits of gunk.
  If the acid has dried up dampen it first with a wet tissue.
  Neutralise the acid leakage with baking soda.  Just pour it on straight
from the box.
  The baking soda will fizz as it combines with the (wet) acid to form a
soluble salt.
  After all fizzing has stopped shake off the excess baking soda.
  Wipe with a wet tissue to remove the salt laden water.
  [or use a spray of water if there is a lot to get rid of]
Repeat all of above several times.

Finish by wiping or spraying with distilled water (or alcohol).
Dry.

Inspect the tracks and repair/re-build any badly corroded ones.

Switch on (and hope).


Print this email and pin up over your work bench for future reference.

Bye.



       {Original Message removed}

2001\11\07@184629 by David VanHorn

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At 10:31 AM 11/8/01 +1100, Gennette, Bruce wrote:
>Battery Corrosion - How to Get Rid of it.
>
>Scrape away large bits of gunk.
>    If the acid has dried up dampen it first with a wet tissue.
>    Neutralise the acid leakage with baking soda.  Just pour it on straight
>from the box.

Many camera batteries (all?) use an alkaline electrolyte.
Dilution is safer, as it's always predictable.
How do you know you don't end up with an alkaline residue?
Either way is bad, and you may leave other reaction products.
At every step, DW leaves you in better shape than you were before.

>Finish by wiping or spraying with distilled water (or alcohol).

You get here anyway

>Dry.

Important.
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Bi-directional read of UPC-A, UPC-E, EAN-8, EAN-13, JAN, and Bookland, with
two or five digit supplemental codes, in an 8 pin chip, with NO external parts.

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2001\11\14@093119 by Andrew E. Kalman

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Hi Dave, Alan, Bruce et. al.

Thank you for your advice.

The corrosion I encountered could be found in two general places --
on the flat contacts of removable battery "clips", and on spring
contacts inside electronic equipment (e.g. flashes).

I decided to have a go at the battery clips with the water, baking
soda and alcohol approach, since the clips could be immersed in
liquid without any worries.

I gathered my kids around, wet the clips with warm water, and then
had them dab dry, fresh baking soda on the corroded terminals with
some Q-tips.  I was hoping for a dramatic, fizzling reaction, but
unfortunately it was Dullsville, and the kids quickly lost interest.
But, on the terminals that were not severely corroded, they actually
cleaned up quite nicely.

Inside the flashes the corrosion was much less to begin with, and I
was able to clean up the terminals  acceptably using an eraser --
I'll probably leave it at that.

So, thanks for your advice. It seems to me that as long as the
corrosion isn't too severe, the baking soda approach has a good
chance of working.

Regards,
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2001\11\14@094432 by Douglas Butler

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With alkaline batteries the leaked fluid is not acid.  Therefore I think
the baking soda is used as a mild abrasive rather than for chemical
action.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\11\14@110001 by David VanHorn

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>
>I gathered my kids around, wet the clips with warm water, and then had
>them dab dry, fresh baking soda on the corroded terminals with some
>Q-tips.  I was hoping for a dramatic, fizzling reaction, but unfortunately
>it was Dullsville, and the kids quickly lost interest. But, on the
>terminals that were not severely corroded, they actually cleaned up quite
>nicely.

As I said, the electrolyte in most camera batteries, maybe all, is
alkaline, so it won't react much with baking soda.
The baking soda may have been useful as an abrasive, but I wouldn't have
put it into the mix.

--
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Got a need to read Bar codes?  http://www.barcodechip.com
Bi-directional read of UPC-A, UPC-E, EAN-8, EAN-13, JAN, and Bookland, with
two or five digit supplemental codes, in an 8 pin chip, with NO external parts.

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2001\11\14@113814 by Kevin Blain

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vineger? (acetic Acid?)

Regards, Kevin

-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[RemoveMEPICLISTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of David VanHorn
Sent: 14 November 2001 15:58
To: PICLISTEraseMEspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [OT]: Battery Corrosion and How to Get Rid of it?


>
>I gathered my kids around, wet the clips with warm water, and then had
>them dab dry, fresh baking soda on the corroded terminals with some
>Q-tips.  I was hoping for a dramatic, fizzling reaction, but unfortunately
>it was Dullsville, and the kids quickly lost interest. But, on the
>terminals that were not severely corroded, they actually cleaned up quite
>nicely.

As I said, the electrolyte in most camera batteries, maybe all, is
alkaline, so it won't react much with baking soda.
The baking soda may have been useful as an abrasive, but I wouldn't have
put it into the mix.

--
Dave's Engineering Page: http://www.dvanhorn.org

Got a need to read Bar codes?  http://www.barcodechip.com
Bi-directional read of UPC-A, UPC-E, EAN-8, EAN-13, JAN, and Bookland, with
two or five digit supplemental codes, in an 8 pin chip, with NO external
parts.

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2001\11\14@115042 by David VanHorn

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At 04:36 PM 11/14/01 +0000, Kevin Blain wrote:
>vineger? (acetic Acid?)

Well.. I would advise against adding any more reactants to the soup.
It's true that alkalines neutralize acids, but if you have more of either
one, then you're back in the same situation as before. Since you have no
way to know how much of the first that you started with, I think you just
end up in a chemical mess.   My father, the camera repairman,
agrees.  Distilled water always puts you in a better position than you were
in before, by always diluting whatever's there.


--
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Got a need to read Bar codes?  http://www.barcodechip.com
Bi-directional read of UPC-A, UPC-E, EAN-8, EAN-13, JAN, and Bookland, with
two or five digit supplemental codes, in an 8 pin chip, with NO external parts.

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2001\11\16@161136 by Peter L. Peres

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If you are desperate find an acid that is not strong enough to corrode the
base metal quickly and dunk the part in it briefly. This does not work
with plated contacts, unless the plating is a noble metal and you are sure
it is intact (you can never be sure).

The idea is that the strong acid corrodes a small amount of the base
metal, restoring the surface, and any gunk or result of previous corrosion
will be loosened and fall off (it is assumed that the gunk was previously
scoured mechanically and weakened). The parts need to be washed
immediately afterwards in running water or a large vat of neutral water
(or slightly basic). With noble metals the noble metal does not get
corroded at all, or extremely little (Gold, Rhodium, Platinum etc). Most
contact metals do not react with bases so they can be washed in quite
strong, hot NaOH solutions (caustic soda) at length.

The method is used extensively for cleaning jewellery and small parts
(even semiconductor chips during processing). The acid varies from HNO3
10% at room temperature to HNO3+H2SO4+HCL+H2O2 at 70C (Ouch).

Peter

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2001\11\16@163010 by Douglas Butler

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It is commonly referred to as "Pickling" a piece of metal to clean it.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\11\17@081228 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza

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>The method is used extensively for cleaning jewellery and small parts
>(even semiconductor chips during processing). The acid varies from HNO3
>10% at room temperature to HNO3+H2SO4+HCL+H2O2 at 70C (Ouch).

       Ugh, baby, it hurts! ;oO


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