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'[OT]: AC mains into PIC pin'
2002\11\08@084736 by Josh Koffman

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Changed the topic tag :) Comments within...

Josh
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Russell McMahon wrote:
> > > I am sure you wouldn't place a post referring to "Chilly Bins"
>
> Also called "Eskys" by our Oz brethren.
> Insulating container for food or drink. Usually kept cold with ice.
> Often found to contain (or have contained) beer
> Often polystyrene.
> I've no idea what our US brothers call these.

In Canada, called coolers, or sometimes by a couple of common brand
names such as Coleman or Igloo


> > > "Jandals"
>
> Casual footwear with a flattish sole and two (usually) rubber (like) straps
> extending from a vertical common point at the front to points at each side
> about ?70% from the front. The vertical common point fits between the
> wearers big and second toe. Foot slips in and out easily. Not recommended
> for running in or motorcycling :-(.

Generally called flip flops, or just plain sandals.

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2002\11\11@050415 by Alan B. Pearce

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>And don't get me started on "aluminum", darn
>how can you remove letters from an element in
>the periodic table to suit the pronunciation of
>the ignorant masses? Surely American scientists
>actually spell the elements correctly even if
>aluminum siding salesmen can't??

Well at least they changed the spelling to match the pronunciation.

Not like saying "sodder" for "solder"

and how about my favourite, Arkansas, and Kansas.

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2002\11\11@050621 by Alan B. Pearce

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>It's always intrigued me why the language had to be "simplified" :-)

Ahh someone who has not lived in England.

How would you expect to pronounce Towcester. ????

It is pronounced as "Toaster" - no wonder the Americans gave English an
overhaul, but then see my previous message on this :))

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2002\11\11@072439 by Russell McMahon

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> How would you expect to pronounce Towcester. ????
>
> It is pronounced as "Toaster" - no wonder the Americans gave English an
> overhaul, but then see my previous message on this :))

The British are good at such things:

Cholmondeley?      Chumly
Worcestershire?     Worster
Pall Mall                 Pell Mell
Pell Mell                 Pell Mell :-)
Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch
(pass)

Only exceeded by


Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakit
anatahu

here in New Zealand.

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2002\11\11@092706 by Dale Botkin

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On Mon, 11 Nov 2002, Alan B. Pearce wrote:

> Well at least they changed the spelling to match the pronunciation.
>
> Not like saying "sodder" for "solder"
>
> and how about my favourite, Arkansas, and Kansas.

Or Gloucestershire, or Worcester, or...

8-)

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2002\11\11@094955 by Roman Black

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Dale Botkin wrote:
>
> On Mon, 11 Nov 2002, Alan B. Pearce wrote:
>
> > Well at least they changed the spelling to match the pronunciation.
> >
> > Not like saying "sodder" for "solder"
> >
> > and how about my favourite, Arkansas, and Kansas.
>
> Or Gloucestershire, or Worcester, or...


But that's not an entire nation mis-spelling
the name of an element in the periodic table
when the rest of the world can get it right!

Just the local residents pronunciation of their
home towns and i'm sure you will find "sloppy"
town names like this in ANY country, even the
ones that can spell elements. <grin>
-Roman

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2002\11\11@101240 by Dale Botkin

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On Tue, 12 Nov 2002, Roman Black wrote:

> But that's not an entire nation mis-spelling
> the name of an element in the periodic table
> when the rest of the world can get it right!

Hrmm...  interesting.  Actually it was a Brit - Sir Humphrey Davy - that
originally proposed "aluminum", but later changed it to the -ium ending to
be more consistent with the other element names.  I won't apologize for
the way we spell or pronounce anything; wasn't my decision.  I'm just glad
to be here, following local custom.

Dale

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2002\11\11@120757 by David Harris

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But don't you realize that this is what gives Engand its charm?  Why change
it?
David

"Alan B. Pearce" wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2002\11\11@133406 by William Chops Westfield

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   But that's not an entire nation mis-spelling
   the name of an element in the periodic table
   when the rest of the world can get it right!

Huh?  Lots of languages have "local" names for assorted elements.
Even saw some of the original names go by ("Kalium")

BillW

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2002\11\11@163612 by Russell McMahon

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> But that's not an entire nation mis-spelling
> the name of an element in the periodic table
> when the rest of the world can get it right!

FWIW, be aware that the official and correct spelling of Al is Aluminum.
It was not always so.

       RM

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2002\11\11@180620 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff

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Russell,

> FWIW, be aware that the official and correct spelling of Al is
> Aluminum.
> It was not always so.

Are you sure?

"In 1761 de Morveau proposed the name "alumine" for the base in alum.
In 1807, Davy proposed the name alumium for the metal, undiscovered at
that time, and later agreed to change it to aluminum. Shortly
thereafter, the name aluminium was adopted by IUPAC to conform with the
"ium" ending of most elements. Aluminium is the IUPAC spelling and
therefore the international standard. Aluminium was also the accepted
spelling in the U.S.A. until 1925, at which time the American Chemical
Society decided to revert back to aluminum, and to this day Americans
still refer to aluminium as "aluminum".

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2002\11\11@183939 by Sean H. Breheny

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There seems to be at least one error in that story because IUPAC was
founded in 1919, which is hardly "shortly thereafter" to the early 1800s.

Sean

At 10:04 AM 11/12/2002 +1100, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2002\11\11@184533 by Dr Martin Hill

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I suggest you tell the people at http://www.webelements.com as it appears
that the description below was copied from there.

Martin

{Original Message removed}

2002\11\11@191508 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff

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> There seems to be at least one error in that story because IUPAC was
> founded in 1919, which is hardly "shortly thereafter" to the early
> 1800s.

Well, it was quoted and the "shortly thereafter", comes after "and
later agreed to change it ..."

Are you disputing the fact "the name Aluminium was adopted by IUPAC..."
or "Aluminium is the IUPAC spelling and therefore the international
standard."?" as these are the main significant points of the "story".
When IUPAC was actually founded is irrelevant.

Sean

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2002\11\11@192130 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff

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> I suggest you tell the people at http://www.webelements.com as it
> appears
> that the description below was copied from there.

Yes, it was Martin and I had thought I posted the complete link as
well, but your post made me check and I had not pasted it in;

www.webelements.com/webelements/scholar/elements/aluminium/
history.html

However, I think it's not even worth pointing out to them. ;-)

Cheers,

Sean

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2002\11\11@194420 by Jonathan Johnson

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they look more like PGP signatures than place names ;-)

{Quote hidden}

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2002\11\11@195421 by Russell McMahon

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> > FWIW, be aware that the official and correct spelling of Al is
> > Aluminum.
> > It was not always so.
>
> Are you sure?

I suspect my comment was based on pre 1990 information. I remember a
rambling and convincing discourse (possibly by Isaac Asimov) about why
Aluminum was "correct" even though it was euphonically displeasing to those
who speak (real) English.

Here's some more

       http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/aluminium.htm

Apparently IUPAC officially saw the light and got it right (last time
around) in 1990.

I say lets all go for the ORIGINAl name and sidestep all the argument.
From now on it should be, at least for PICList purposes, as it originally
was in 1807, Alumium.


       RM :-)




> "In 1761 de Morveau proposed the name "alumine" for the base in alum.
> In 1807, Davy proposed the name alumium for the metal, undiscovered at
> that time, and later agreed to change it to aluminum. Shortly
> thereafter, the name aluminium was adopted by IUPAC to conform with the
> "ium" ending of most elements. Aluminium is the IUPAC spelling and
> therefore the international standard. Aluminium was also the accepted
> spelling in the U.S.A. until 1925, at which time the American Chemical
> Society decided to revert back to aluminum, and to this day Americans
> still refer to aluminium as "aluminum".

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2002\11\11@195430 by Sean H. Breheny

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Hi Sean,

I wasn't disputing either point, since I really don't know the correct
answer (i.e., which spelling is preferred by IUPAC). I was just being picky
about the way they worded it. As I read it, they are saying that Davy was
the one who "later agreed to change it". Since he made his original
suggestion in 1807, I am assuming that he "later agreed to change it" at
some point in the next 50 years or so, not anytime very close to 1919.

Sean

At 11:14 AM 11/12/2002 +1100, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2002\11\11@201913 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff

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Sean,

> I wasn't disputing either point, since I really don't know the correct
> answer (i.e., which spelling is preferred by IUPAC).

According to Russell, they changed their minds again in 1990 - wimps!

> I was just being picky about the way they worded it.

Fair enough.

> As I read it, they are saying that Davy was the one who "later agreed
> to change it".

Well somebody else has volunteered something similar, so this part
sounds right.

> Since he made his original
> suggestion in 1807, I am assuming that he "later agreed to change it"
> at
> some point in the next 50 years or so

While he still had his marbles? :-)

>  not anytime very close to 1919.

Fair enough.

I gave up trying to navigate the official IUPAC site. It seems mostly
about p**sing in each other's pockets.

We don't have a problem with the yanks. If we we really wanted to annoy
them, then the Brits, Kiwis and Aussies could start using rhyming slang
on the list! :-)

Cheers,

Sean

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2002\11\11@221019 by Herbert Graf

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> Are you sure?
>
> "In 1761 de Morveau proposed the name "alumine" for the base in alum.
> In 1807, Davy proposed the name alumium for the metal, undiscovered at
> that time, and later agreed to change it to aluminum. Shortly
> thereafter, the name aluminium was adopted by IUPAC to conform with the
> "ium" ending of most elements. Aluminium is the IUPAC spelling and
> therefore the international standard. Aluminium was also the accepted
> spelling in the U.S.A. until 1925, at which time the American Chemical
> Society decided to revert back to aluminum, and to this day Americans
> still refer to aluminium as "aluminum".

       Hmm, very interesting, both sides have a valid case. Aluminium is the
"official" way, Aluminum is the "traditional" way. FWIW I'm in Canada and
although most pronouce it the "American" way I prefer to pronouce it the
"official" way, just sounds better IMHO. TTYL

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2002\11\11@225007 by Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff

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Herman,

>         Hmm, very interesting, both sides have a valid case. Aluminium
> is the
> "official" way, Aluminum is the "traditional" way.

I think here lies the argument - "traditional" for Brits, Aussies and
Kiwis is with the 'extra' syllable. Where in North America they might
look on the word Aluminium as being wrong or having some nostalgic
value - for us it's simply the correct word to use.

Shortly after I moved to Taiwan, I was in the process of establishing
my own company.  With my first son on the way and trying to get a new
company up and running, I needed some dough. I got a job writing User
Guides for a networking (hardware and software) company. The company
had had pretty poor documentation at best. I worked for a fixed price,
but really put a lot of time and effort into my first major job - in
order to prove they had made a wise choice!

I showed my colleagues for their critique, then handed my first (very
polished) draft in to my boss. He flicked through it and seemed
somewhat impressed. Then he closed it and studied the front cover for a
long time - almost meditating. Then finally he looked at me with a
frown and said "It's very good Sean, but this flag - shouldn't it be an
American flag?"

On the front cover I had the "Union Jack" and underneath the words
"English Version" - I couldn't believe it, but then decided that it was
so typically a Taiwanese comment. They think the sun shines out of
Uncle Sam's backside (even though Uncle Sam left them High & Dry).
Rather than argue my point, I simply deleted the flag altogether! :-)

FWIW, I take this far less seriously than some on the list. I just find
an interest in the origins of words and their meanings. I certainly
won't accept my kids spelling words with the American spelling. I am
proud to still use the original English, and accept that it must
evolve. I just wish it would evolve internationally.

Sean

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2002\11\12@011003 by Nate Duehr

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On Mon, 2002-11-11 at 20:48, Sean Alcorn - PIC Stuff wrote:

> On the front cover I had the "Union Jack" and underneath the words
> "English Version" - I couldn't believe it, but then decided that it was
> so typically a Taiwanese comment. They think the sun shines out of
> Uncle Sam's backside (even though Uncle Sam left them High & Dry).
> Rather than argue my point, I simply deleted the flag altogether!

Oh, I *must* poke some fun back here...

High and dry?  Is that what I should call my tax dollars paying for a
Carrier Air Group and embarked Air Wing near the South China Sea day and
night, year-round, to keep their neighbors to their west from getting
too frisky?  (No matter what order you put the dates in... GRIN.)

I don't see any Aircraft Carriers flying the Union Jack providing much
cover for the Straits.

Not that a Harrier would be much use over open ocean, anyway... make a
nice splash is about it when an AAMRAM copy came off the rails of a
Flanker (Su-27) 100 miles away... nice fat hot slow TARGET.

Nate, .....natespam_OUTspamnatetech.com

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