Searching \ for '[OT]:: Better cheaper faster fencepost anchoring i' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=better+cheaper+faster
Search entire site for: ': Better cheaper faster fencepost anchoring i'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT]:: Better cheaper faster fencepost anchoring i'
2011\01\27@190601 by RussellMc

face picon face
Summary:  Creative ideas wanted  for cheap, quick, robustish [choose any 3]
in ground mounts for "very tall fenceposts".

I wish to build a number of short term "towers".
2 to 3 metres high.
Robust enough that a strong man couldn't easily push one over.
(That's an arbitrary strength measure but gives some idea).
Some could be weaker. Any stronger and formal methods probably apply.

I'm looking for "lightbulb"  ideas for anchoring these in unprepared ground
(dirt) with minimum effort and cost, good rigidity and ideally ease of
removal.

Any number of "common sense" / everyday solutions are available. A few -

Hammer in post,
weighted frame,
Dig a hole, (augur, spade, hose!...)
hole with concrete,
hole with wedges,
Warratah (antipodean metal 3 rail ground anchoring fence post)(named after a
rather tough Austalian plant),
guys with anchors, (soil anchors, screws, ...) ... . I
props,
....

BUT somebody may well have a "why don't you just ..." idea.

eg tyre filled with concrete, water filled ..., frame from a ... , ...

Using a car is not viable in this context.
Anchoring is good but size, availability of N, wind obstruction, cost,
difficulty in getting it out of the  garden afterwards etc preclude such.

Aim is to support very very very small wind turbines for testing in a range
of circumstances.
Support height is usually low - maybe in the 2 to 3 metre range above
mounting point.
(Note: that is NOT what you should be doing usually with any sensible WT).

Target wind speeds are low - say under 10 m/s (20 mph / 30 kph) max and
usually much less.
Forces are in most case small by WT standards. Upper size would have
perhaps 1 m^2 swept area BUT this would be effective only at low win
speeds.

As a guide, using f ~~~= 0.65.A.V^3   (Newton, m^2, m/s) at sea level
You get about 65 kgf per m^2 at 10 m/s
65 kg side 'force" at the top of a 3 metre tower
~= 200 kg.m torque
would be 'challenging" [tm].

In most cases I'd be dealing with much much less than that and by the time I
got to that upper extreme I'd be looking at more formal means.
Force rises as V^3 (see above formula) so at very high wind speeds no simple
solution is going to work.
That's not relevant here.

2011\01\27@191555 by Josh Koffman

face picon face
On Thu, Jan 27, 2011 at 7:05 PM, RussellMc <spam_OUTapptechnzTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
> Summary:  Creative ideas wanted  for cheap, quick, robustish [choose any 3]
>  in ground mounts for "very tall fenceposts".

Does it have to be in ground? My first thought (once context was
given) was to look at free standing punching bags. A random search
turns up:

http://www.karatedepot.com/tr-bg-724.html

They claim shipping weight of 31lbs, but a weight of 250lbs when
filled with water or sand (they don't specify which one would give
that weight, perhaps they are equal).

Something like this might easily be made with some 55 gallon drums.

Josh
-- A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
        -Douglas Adams

2011\01\27@192701 by Gordon Williams

flavicon
face
Have you googled for "Fence post spike"

What's a post spike?

A post spike is a heavy metal spike about 24 or 30 inches long with a metal
box (usually 4" x 4") attached to the top, designed to hold the base of a
wooden fence post. You simply drive the post spike into the ground where you
want to put your fence post and then insert the wooden post into the box.
The idea is to provide a convenient and economical way to build a fence - no
need to dig holes and pour concrete, and the post spikes only cost a few
dollars each.

I've used them and they are simple to use.  If they aren't rigid enough then
add guy wires.

Gordon Williams




{Original Message removed}

2011\01\27@194531 by Carl Denk

flavicon
face

Sand is approximately 130 lbs./cubic foot. Water is 62.4 lbs./cubic foot.
> They claim shipping weight of 31lbs, but a weight of 250lbs when
> filled with water or sand (they don't specify which one would give
> that weight, perhaps they are equal).
>
> Something like this might easily be made with some 55 gallon drums.
>
> Josh
>

2011\01\27@194922 by Josh Koffman

face picon face
On Thu, Jan 27, 2011 at 7:45 PM, Carl Denk <.....cdenkKILLspamspam@spam@windstream.net> wrote:
>
> Sand is approximately 130 lbs./cubic foot. Water is 62.4 lbs./cubic foot.

I kind of figured sand would be heavier. The upside to water is that
it could be easier to empty the containers and move them away.
Downside might be if you didn't have a ready water source at your
location.

Josh
-- A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
        -Douglas Adams

2011\01\27@200032 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
Em 27/1/2011 22:45, Carl Denk escreveu:
> Sand is approximately 130 lbs./cubic foot. Water is 62.4 lbs./cubic foot.


And what would be the density if filling with sand and then pouring
water to fill the voids?
__________________________________________________
Fale com seus amigos  de graça com o novo Yahoo! Messenger http://br.messenger.yahoo.com

2011\01\27@201716 by RussellMc

face picon face
> And what would be the density if filling with sand and then pouring
> water to fill the voids?

That's an interesting question with an "obvious" but (arguably)
counterintuitive answer.

Density will RISE when lower density material is added ;-).

This is because sand density is calculated with air void mass included
in calculation.
ie the material sand is made from has a higher density than sand, but
when it is ground up, density drops due to low desity air being added.

The obviousness of this can be seen in the observation "wet sand is
heavier than dry sand" (for equal volumes).

For an N% void volume you'll get ABOUT N/2% mass increase.

So if 10% void % you'll get 5% mass increase.
Memory suggests the ratio is typically higher.

Pouring of wet sand tends not to happen so yo'd want to do it with
good access to the contents if wanting to empty it.



           Russel

2011\01\27@203342 by Oli Glaser

flavicon
face
On 28/01/2011 00:26, Gordon Williams wrote:
> A post spike is a heavy metal spike about 24 or 30 inches long with a metal
> box (usually 4" x 4") attached to the top, designed to hold the base of a
> wooden fence post. You simply drive the post spike into the ground where you
> want to put your fence post and then insert the wooden post into the box.
> The idea is to provide a convenient and economical way to build a fence - no
> need to dig holes and pour concrete, and the post spikes only cost a few
> dollars each.
>
> I've used them and they are simple to use.  If they aren't rigid enough then
> add guy wires.

Good idea, I've used them too and they work quite well.
I think maybe the easiest way to provide (easily removable) rigid posts is to make sure the are driven in deep, i.e. the deeper you go, the more stable they will be. If wobbling (which they may do depending on how snug the fit is, but will not "fall over" - two different problems) is an issue, then guy ropes or (more permanent) concrete (or sand maybe) poured around base should work.

2011\01\27@203534 by Carl Denk

flavicon
face
Sand is roughly 30% voids, so the volume of water would be 0.3 cu.ft. , and that water would weight around 19 lbs, so total density would be 130 + 19 = 149 lbs./cu.ft. For a civil engineer, this is part of a common calculation when designing a concrete mixture. Yes, they are designed! :)  These rough calcs are based on the sand being (oven) dry. Commonly sand might have 15% water, it will look damp, but not have any free water. I have seen trucks loaded with sand and considerable water added just before the truck went to the weight scales to determine the pay quantity of product sold by the ton. Standard (not light or heavy weight) Concrete is around 145 - 150 lbs/Cu.ft.

And from a recent message:

This is because sand density is calculated with air void mass included
in calculation.

True

ie the material sand is made from has a higher density than sand, but
when it is ground up, density drops due to low desity air being added.

The rough 30% void ratio above, is true for uniform sized materials, whether they be fine like ground up portland cement to or a course stone, up to large pieces. Concrete is designed by taking the voids (percent of air space) of the biggest stone, filling it with the next smaller material , etc. the portland cement is next to last, and water last.




On 1/27/2011 8:00 PM, Isaac Marino Bavaresco wrote:
> Em 27/1/2011 22:45, Carl Denk escreveu:
>    
>> Sand is approximately 130 lbs./cubic foot. Water is 62.4 lbs./cubic foot..
>>      
>
> And what would be the density if filling with sand and then pouring
> water to fill the voids?
> __________________________________________________
> Fale com seus amigos  de graça com o novo Yahoo! Messenger
> http://br.messenger.yahoo.com/
>

2011\01\28@002304 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
All over my property I have 4 inch diameter low cost plastic pipe ( 24 to 36 inches long ) that I have installed in the ground using a variety of techniques.  Sometimes I dug the hole with a water sprayer.  Sometimes with a post hole digger. Sometimes by driving a 2 inch metal tube into the ground and pulling cores of dirt out.
I move my fences around by dropping 2x4 lumber into the holes and attqching fence panels to the 2x4s.
Don't ask me why I move fences around so much....   it has to do with the government.

Gus in Denver   99gu

2011\01\28@010148 by RussellMc

face picon face
> All over my property I have 4 inch diameter low cost plastic pipe  ..

Advice on moveable  fenceposts appreciated

Anyone wanting to extend the 'the government' aspect should do so
under a different subject heading, and preferably on another list :-).
If uncertain Bob will probably suggest one for you.


2011\01\28@060537 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
Em 27/1/2011 23:35, Carl Denk escreveu:
> Sand is roughly 30% voids, so the volume of water would be 0.3 cu.ft. ,
> and that water would weight around 19 lbs, so total density would be 130
> + 19 = 149 lbs./cu.ft.


Almost 15% increase, not bad.


> I have seen trucks loaded with sand and considerable water added
> just before the truck went to the weight scales to determine the pay
> quantity of product sold by the ton.


The cotton producers also do something like this, they use steam to
increase the humidity in the cotton as the last step before pressing and
packing it. They increase the humidity almost to the maximum accepted by
the buyers before they start discounting weight.

Curiously, cotton that is too wet may catch fire spontaneously in the
warehouses. This happens to other agricultural products as well.



__________________________________________________
Fale com seus amigos  de graça com o novo Yahoo! Messenger http://br.messenger.yahoo.com

2011\01\28@105547 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On Thu, Jan 27, 2011 at 4:15 PM, Josh Koffman <joshybearspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:
> On Thu, Jan 27, 2011 at 7:05 PM, RussellMc <.....apptechnzKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:
>> Summary:  Creative ideas wanted  for cheap, quick, robustish [choose any 3]
>>  in ground mounts for "very tall fenceposts".
>
> Does it have to be in ground? My first thought (once context was
> given) was to look at free standing punching bags. A random search
> turns up:
>
> http://www.karatedepot.com/tr-bg-724.html

In a similar vein, a freestanding basketball hoop:
http://www.competitiveedgeproducts.com/detail.aspx?ID=52

2011\01\28@110832 by Brooke Clarke

flavicon
face
Hi Russell:

THE answer is to use the dirt that was removed from the hole.  This has been the way to do it for a very long time.
The hard part is that you need to tamp the dirt as it's put back into the hole so that it's very hard.

-- Have Fun,

Brooke Clarke
http://www.PRC68.com

2011\01\28@122749 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
RussellMc wrote:

> Summary:  Creative ideas wanted  for cheap, quick, robustish [choose any 3]
>  in ground mounts for "very tall fenceposts".

For 2-3 m and temporary installation, it might be easiest to hook up 3
(steel?) ropes to the top and fix them with (smallish) anchors in the
ground. Nothing to dig, pour, ... just hammer in the anchors.

Gerhar

2011\01\28@125822 by John Gardner

picon face
> Nothing to dig, pour, ... just hammer in the anchors...

I agree. I mentioned raising the beast with a gin pole & come-alongs
because it's also easy to take it down that way, without "adventure".

 Jac

2011\01\29@093615 by N. T.

picon face
RussellMc wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Also a system of wet sand particles may fall into developing more
dense structure than system of dry particles, kind of "quicksand"
effect

2011\01\29@094533 by Carl Denk

flavicon
face
Early in this thread I answered that question. Roughly, and typically, 30% voids, sand 130 PCF, water 62.4 PCF, think the final number around 145 PCF.

On 1/29/2011 9:36 AM, N. T. wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>


'[OT]:: Better cheaper faster fencepost anchoring i'
2011\02\01@071043 by RussellMc
face picon face
Various spiral screw in thingies are available as soil anchors for braces or
guys or direct post supports.

It occurred to me that the right diameter car coil springs may do a good
job. Grind a nice point / angled flat at one end. Driving them and attaching
to them may be assisted by using part of what they came out of. Motorcycle
shocks or front suspension parts may also provide springs but liable to be
lower diameter/ generally more wimpy / probably dearer. Pitch or profile not
optimised for soil applications (not purposefully or probably anyway) but
worth a try.

A common enough part may be available at steel scrap cost or free with
identical parts available in volume. Time for a play ... :-).

Otto ... ? :-)



                     Russel

2011\02\01@072449 by RussellMc

face picon face
This has sat here a while and risks getting out of date.
Will briefly titivate and send.

This started off as a quick response to one suggestion but has grown into a
general comment on a subset of suggestions so far. Most suggestions so far
have been variants on my original list of known possibles BUT the details,
experiences and general comments have certainly been useful and welcome.
Keep them coming ....

Modified requirement:  (see original post for fuller description). :

Note - this is for te\\short term temporary supports for prototype systems.
Some ideas may spawn solutions for more "real" systems but for now "Heath
Robinson Rules" are acceptable.

Summary:  Creative ideas wanted  for cheap, quick, robustish [choose any 3]
in/on ground mounts for "very tall fenceposts". I wish to build a number of
short term "towers", 2 to 3 metres high. Robust enough that a strong man
couldn't easily push one over.  I'm looking for "lightbulb"  ideas for
anchoring these in unprepared ground (dirt) with minimum effort and cost,
good rigidity and ideally ease of removal. Use is for temporary mounting of
prototype wind-turbines with up to about 1 square meter area and survival in
moderate winds only required. Low footprint and site impact is useful (eg
can be installed in Petunia patch and removed with minimal damage).
__________

> Guy wires

A recurrent theme :-).

I mentioned guy wires in my original list of commonsense/everyday solutions,
and they certainly have some advantages - notably of reducing the required
force in a force x distance moment arm.
I've had about 15 replies and about 1/3 of them mentioned guy wires as the
or part of a solution. Certainly worth using in some cases.

Ideas welcome for cheap guy anchors that can be inserted and removed with
ease. Cost asymptoting to zero in modest volume always welcome. Various
screw and stamp in anchors exist. Some quite real galvanised ones available
but unit cost such that they would not tend to be stocked  liberally.

"Warratahs" - solid metal 3 blade fence posts made to be rammed into the
ground and with total lengths of up to several metres, are available locally
at OKish prices even new.

I may be able to find a pile of these second hand or old and rusty for even
less and, for my purposes, condition is not too important. Cutting these
into shorter lengths would provide enough retention force for guy anchors -
he softer the soil the longer the segment needed. These are removable with
a lever type puller with an N:1 mechanical advantage. N should be large in
good soil. One could make a hydraulic jack extractor but time taken would be
annoying.

Use of car springs mentioned in just prior email.
These could be used for guy or prop anchors or, as I see done with a spiral
anchor by one company , with a platform fixed to the top end that is screwed
down against the ground and with brackets for a post fixed directly to the
platform. probably not enough moment resistance as described but a minor mod
may help.

A single central spiral anchor that provides vertical resistant  force
combined with a smallish radial platform at ground level that provided
resistance against overturning moment might  work together quite
effectively.

Noting that this is for experimental & temporary structures, and that the
actual WT devices may have very low capital cost and, depending what
happens, maybe even have extraordinarily low labour content, the ideal
(ignoring "what's practical") would be a single post that is easily
inserted, easily removed, "stiff enough" and ideally low cost OR a ground
sitting braced structure that wasn't too out of place in many locations.
Approximjately zero cost wouldn't hurt.

There are various portable  basketball hoop supports around that can be
water or sand filled. Water filling makes relocation easier than sand in
this application at the cost of less stability. There are quite a few on
Trademe, (NZ auction site) with condition and prices very variable (and not
tightly correlated). Footprint is not good for flower garden  type use but
OK for concrete or lawn.  Punchbag support using the same method have been
suggested.

Gus suggested multiple 20 litre water or soil filled containers (say 4 in a
quad), and that is probably a very suitable solution in many cases. Even
tight clusted 4 such would provide a reasonable moment arm and with some
spacing at the end of "feet" this can be arbitrarily large.

I have a proof of concept rubbish-rescued deck umbrella support  that uses
a tube-and-pressed-metal four limb foot base with "quite long" feet that
seems OKish.

I have a bucket (literally) WT on about a 3 metre pole on a circular shop
display large circular "foot". Stability in high winds will have "negative
margin".

I have a cheap plastic circular outdoor table which has 4 legs joining to a
cross structure foot underneath  an umbrella support hole in the middle with
a reinforced guide tube running from table top to a hole in the middle of
the cross structure. The umbrella hole and guide tube is a good fit for a
500 PVC pipe (sections of which trickle in from various sources) and
stability with the bucket WT was fine. Turning this upside w\down and
weighting the table top would provide more support than the plastic strength
would allow, the main drawback probably being the large footprint. A bit
gross visually but useful for experiment.

If the car spring spiral anchor can be made to work well it may be an ideal
quick cheap temporary support system component - either for a single foot
system or for a 3 guy system - far more "normal" but less minimalist and
higher visual impact.

Keep em coming ...



       Russel

2011\02\01@074001 by Geo

picon face
RussellMc wrote:

> Ideas welcome for cheap guy anchors that can be inserted and removed with
> ease. Cost asymptoting to zero in modest volume always welcome. Various
> screw and stamp in anchors exist. Some quite real galvanised ones available
> but unit cost such that they would not tend to be stocked  liberally.

Not my definition of "cheap" but the first item here is unusual:-
http://www.transair.co.uk/pp+Aircraft-Tie-Down-Kits+509

-- George Smit

2011\02\01@075742 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> > Guy wires
>
> A recurrent theme :-).
>
> I mentioned guy wires in my original list of commonsense/everyday solutions,
> and they certainly have some advantages - notably of reducing the required
> force in a force x distance moment arm.
> I've had about 15 replies and about 1/3 of them mentioned guy wires as the
> or part of a solution. Certainly worth using in some cases.
>
> Ideas welcome for cheap guy anchors that can be inserted and removed with
> ease. Cost asymptoting to zero in modest volume always welcome. Various
> screw and stamp in anchors exist. Some quite real galvanised ones available
> but unit cost such that they would not tend to be stocked  liberally.

Guy wires are the obvious 'light weight' scheme whatever one uses for the base. I started off thinking in terms of the 4" square post holder that gets hammered into the ground, as mentioned by someone previously, then guyed by wires off to similar items also hammered into the ground. However to keep the unit cost down it may be better to have the guy wires go to tent pegs, with the wires being the fine nylon or similar rope used for guy ropes on tents, with the little plastic sliders to adjust the tension. If that is not 'man enough' then use some rebar (possibly reclaimed from demolished concrete structures - it would then probably come with the end already bent in a U) with some steel wire for the guys, and tensioners like used on the stainless steel stays on yacht masts. Such tensioners are available in cheaper versions as used on support wires that go across building spans to carry electrical connections across warehouse spaces etc.

All these items 'should' be easily removed from the ground with a car jack sitting on a suitable plank to spread the downwards force on the relatively soft ground. The post holder may need a bolt through the post for the jack to lever on, but it could be the end of a bolt holding the post in the holder.


> "Warratahs" - solid metal 3 blade fence posts made to be rammed into the
> ground and with total lengths of up to several metres, are available
> locally at OKish prices even new.
....
> One could make a hydraulic jack extractor but time taken would be
> annoying.

Any car jack should be potentially useable, it doesn't need to be hydraulic, although that may give the most ergonomic method.
....
> If the car spring spiral anchor can be made to work well it may be an ideal
> quick cheap temporary support system component - either for a single foot
> system or for a 3 guy system - far more "normal" but less minimalist and
> higher visual impact.

Well, of course if using a guy rope system of some sort, the bottom of the pole does not need to go deep into the ground, just enough to stop the base of the pole going sideways against the moment of the guy anchor point on the pole. This side force at the bottom of the pole will be considerably less than for an unguyed pole.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\02\01@082724 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 01/02/2011 12:24, RussellMc wrote:
> This has sat here a while and risks getting out of date.
Screw in is the only easily removable thing and also works in stony ground. Will give best resistance to being pulled out.

I have a pair of clothes drier line  screw in bases. They have a slide in bar to screw it in/out. No hammering or extraction problems.

one for a pole.
or
three for three poles in tripod
or four for 1 x central pole and 3 for  steel wire guys

About 10 Euro each.

About 35cm to 40cm long, like giant hollow wood screw. Has plastic concentric "spacers" that fit inside top for different diameter poles.

I bought them for Temporary Radio Mast bases. Works well with 6m mast and no guys. I was going to try two 10m poles (clamp together concentric/telescopic) with two guys on each pole and  20m to 80m caged dipole between them.

2011\02\01@085433 by Peter

flavicon
face


On 2/02/2011 12:27 AM, Michael Watterson wrote:
{Quote hidden}

GG found this link

http://www.shoppingbank.com/sb/pia/pid/11555160?afid=466215&coid=46FEED9DFFECBD41B9B47574BC8172C8


Pete

2011\02\01@091707 by Carey Fisher

face picon face
> Summary:  Creative ideas wanted  for cheap, quick, robustish [choose any 3]
>  in/on ground mounts for "very tall fenceposts". I wish to build a number
> of
> short term "towers", 2 to 3 metres high. Robust enough that a strong man
> couldn't easily push one over.  I'm looking for "lightbulb"  ideas for
> anchoring these in unprepared ground (dirt) with minimum effort and cost,
> good rigidity and ideally ease of removal. Use is for temporary mounting of
> prototype wind-turbines with up to about 1 square meter area and survival
> in
> moderate winds only required. Low footprint and site impact is useful (eg
> can be installed in Petunia patch and removed with minimal damage).
> __________
>
> Here's something I've used for temporary ham radio antenna supports:  Screw
a pipe flange to a slab of 3/4" plywood. Screw pipes and couplers (pipe,
coupler, pipe, coupler...) into this flange until you have the desired
length.  Have someone hold this contraption upright while you drive a
vehicle over the wood base so that one tire is on the base.  Alternatively,
screw in the pipes to the flange after you've driven a tire onto base.  You
could also use sandbags or boatanchors (e.g. NC300 and it's ilk [or use an
actual boatanchor]).
This can support 4 masts unless you have an 18 wheeler...
Carey Fisher, K8V

2011\02\01@093115 by RussellMc

face picon face
>> Here's something I've used for temporary ham radio antenna supports:  Screw
> a pipe flange to a slab of 3/4" plywood....

That triggered another thought - possibly not as potentially useful as
my "car spring" one but ...

Car / truck wheel with tyre.
With or without water fill.
Hole though middle.
Could bolt to middle or could insert lightly in ground so pole base
takes side thrust and wheel takes a modified mix of moment arm from
pole plus reaction from pole tip in ground. Sounding good.

Tent pegs of olde school persuasion - used to be lengths of thickish
steel folded over at top, could be driven through stud holes to assist
with anchoring.

Short lengths of rebar must be cheap and largely unwanted, Scrap value
at most*.
Lengths of rebar are probably better than warratas for hammering in as
guy anchors.

(*That said, I long ago knew a man who used to acquire scrap rebar and
weld it into longer lengths and sell it. His product  was fully
certified  for commercial use)



          Russell.

2011\02\01@094146 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
Car spring used as a spiral anchor sounds good.
What might help is a socket drive fitting welded or clamped to the sky-pointing end of the spring.
Dig a hole with post hole digger ..... drop the spring in ..... fill with dirt ( and water ? ) and serve.
Removal would consist of reverse twisting the spring out of the ground.

ta dah

Gus in Denver    99gu

2011\02\01@094713 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 01/02/2011 13:54, Peter wrote:
>> About 35cm to 40cm long, like giant hollow wood screw. Has plastic
>> >  concentric "spacers" that fit inside top for different diameter poles..
>> >
>> >  I bought them for Temporary Radio Mast bases. Works well with 6m mast
>> >  and no guys. I was going to try two 10m poles (clamp together
>> >  concentric/telescopic) with two guys on each pole and  20m to 80m caged
>> >  dipole between them.
> GG found this link
>
> http://www.shoppingbank.com/sb/pia/pid/11555160?afid=466215&coid=46FEED9DFFECBD41B9B47574BC8172C8
>
>
> Peter

The ones I have are fatter and steel.
taller tube part above the thread.

Those would do for guy wires. :-)

Screw in "spring" for guys. Likely someone does them for $5
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004LBX8EY/ref=asc_df_B004LBX8EY1412709?smid=ASK5AEMQDIV2C&tag=dealtmp494425-20&linkCode=asn&creative=395105&creativeASIN=B004LBX8EY

Serious screw a little like the €10 ones I got out of Lidl sold as Rotary Clothes Line base

Note supplied bar to screw it in/out. hole goes through side near fence post mount
http://www.teakwickerandmore.com/Mayne-Inc.-580D-MYN1012.html

Soft ground guy anchors
http://www.teksupply.com/farm/supplies/prod1;;cpcc6250_cc6250.html

Interesting selections
www.thefind.com/garden/info-earth-anchor
http://www.nextag.com/auger-ground-anchors/compare-html

The ones I have are made by "Biko sp.o.o" Poland I think
Max 2.5m pole recommended
The screw thread is about 1cm flange and about 32cm long, then a 10cm taper to a 15 cylindar *

2011\02\01@094958 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 01/02/2011 13:54, Peter wrote:
>> About 35cm to 40cm long, like giant hollow wood screw. Has plastic
>> >  concentric "spacers" that fit inside top for different diameter poles..
>> >
>> >  I bought them for Temporary Radio Mast bases. Works well with 6m mast
>> >  and no guys. I was going to try two 10m poles (clamp together
>> >  concentric/telescopic) with two guys on each pole and  20m to 80m caged
>> >  dipole between them.
> GG found this link
>
> http://www.shoppingbank.com/sb/pia/pid/11555160?afid=466215&coid=46FEED9DFFECBD41B9B47574BC8172C8
>
>
> Peter
There is also these people in Australia
http://www.krinner.com.au/home.html

2011\02\01@141053 by Richard Prosser

picon face
Russell,

I wouldn't give up on the warrtahs. If you have the correct tool for
putting them in (a bit like a sleeve hammer) then it's pretty easy.
(Getting them out afterwards is a bit tougher). Far easier & safer
than trying to put them in with a sledge.

The tool we used to use (Porirua City Council) was just a metre or so
length of steel pipe, firmly blocked at one end and with handles
welded to the outside.  Inside diamerter just slightly larger than the
post.

R

2011\02\01@153937 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
A warrtah with barbs that can be released from above ground and left behind
or be caused to hinge downward with a release mechanism might be handy.
Gus in Denver   99gus


{Quote hidden}

> R

2011\02\07@000729 by Justin Richards

face picon face
Finally clicked ...  warrtahs are what i know as star pickets.
>
> I wouldn't give up on the warrtahs. If you have the correct tool fo

2011\02\07@014731 by RussellMc

face picon face
> Finally clicked ...  warrtahs are what i know as star pickets.

You have flowers called star pickets? :-)

__________

I've had a number of excellent suggestions so far. Many ideas  were
known but some I hadn't thought of or seen before and i'll be going
through the list at some stage to make sure i haven't missed anything.

I've been offered some car springs at scrap value - I'll be trying
them as ground anchors.

I just bought a small trampoline (about 1.6 x 2.4m) at an
embarrassingly low price (petrol to collect it cost more than the
tramp.  www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=351102437
In its intended role its dead. But frame only lying on its back offers
4 nice pipe supports pointing vertically waiting for mast stays. As a
quick test platform with an impressive overturning moment (even before
I weight or pin it, it's hard to beat. Frame knocks down for transport
if desired.

Acquired some locking tent pegs for guy anchoring - std pegs with a
secind thing pin driven in through head at an angle. Usefulness yet
tbd.

Heavy solid pallet about ? 2m x 1.4m presently has a bucket Savonius
on a 3 metre mast "just for fun". More serious stuff to follow soon,
hopefully.

John's tilt-down tower could be stepped on the trampoline frame with
some success - we'll see.


         Russell

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2011 , 2012 only
- Today
- New search...