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'[OT]:: Annoying monitor problem'
2012\05\16@041435 by RussellMc

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A friend reports a monitor problem as below.
Any comments on a fix would be of interest



        Russell

_____________________________

Russell,

We have a number of different machines with LCD and CRT monitors.  Mostly but
not exclusively Dell hardware.  All running WinXP SP3.  All set for exactly the
same screen-saver and power saving settings  - blank screen after 5 minutes,
power down monitor after 10 minutes.

Most systems work as expected/intended.  After the programmed period the
screen-saver kicks in (and the monitor screen goes black), and then after a
further specified period the computer powers down the monitor without further
ado.  On moving the mouse the monitor powers up and the desktop appears on the
screen.

Two of the systems however don't work like this.  They enter screensaver mode
(with a black monitor screen) OK but when the computer attempts to power down
the monitor, the standard Windows "bing-bong" change of hardware status sound is
heard (actually it goes bing-bong longer-delay bing-bong shorter-delay
bong-bing), and the monitor doesn't power down and instead a "loss of signal"
notification appears.

On the Dell monitors this is a rectangular area that slowly roams around the
screen  - being a grey header carrying the Dell logo with Self Test Feature
Check written below and then four colour panels labelled Red, Green, Blue,
White.  This STFC display is locally generated within the monitor whenever it is
unplugged or receives no signal.

If the mouse is then moved the desktop screen appears but initially at a reduced
resolution, and then a few seconds later the screen is refreshed at the original
(higher) resolution.  Sometimes the screen refreshes several times at the
reduced resolution before the original resolution is restored (and in that case
a "bing-bong" sound is heard for each additional refresh).

So there are two annoying problems  - the monitor wastes power by remaining
powered up displaying the loss of signal notification and only a portion of the
desktop can be used because the icons get rearranged to fit the smaller screen
size when the computer wakes up and temporarily displays the desktop at a
reduced resolution.

A quick search of the web shows that others have similar (if not identical)
problems  - but I can find nobody reporting a solution.

The only thing that I can see that is common to the machines that misbehave are
that both have Intel integrated graphics controllers  - while all the others
have plug-in graphics controler cards (from several different manufacturers
including ATI and Nvidia).  The machines which misbehave are:

Machine 1
 Dell Optiplex 760 with Dell E193FP monitor running at max native resolution of
1280x1024
 Intel 4 Series Internal Chipset, Video BIOS 1676.0

Machine 2
 IBM NetVista with Dell E228WFP monitor running max native resolution of 1680 x
1050
 Intel 82845G/GL/GE/Pe/GV Graphics Controllers, Video BIOS 2975

Swapping monitors and cables around seems to make no difference  - the problem
appears to be with the computers concerned.

Any ideas ?

2012\05\16@051020 by Ruben Jönsson

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My dell monitor has an integrated two port USB hub. That could be the cause of the "bing-bong" sound when powering down. If the monitor has a USB hub, try to remove the USB cable between the computer and the monitor and see if that helps. However, the USB hub should not affect the screen, but you never know...

Also, has he tried to update the video drivers?
/Ruben


{Quote hidden}

> -

2012\05\16@052307 by Yigit Turgut

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Try with an external video card see if it's related to it. If it's,
changing the motherboard will probably do the trick (if they still
want to operate onboard vga).

On Wed, May 16, 2012 at 12:10 PM, Ruben Jönsson <spam_OUTmaxrubenTakeThisOuTspamrjjournal.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> -

2012\05\16@061710 by Patrick Moody

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On 16 May 2012 09:13, RussellMc <.....apptechnzKILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:

> //snip//
> Most systems work as expected/intended.  After the programmed period the
> screen-saver kicks in (and the monitor screen goes black), and then after a
> further specified period the computer powers down the monitor without
> further
> ado.  On moving the mouse the monitor powers up and the desktop appears on
> the
> screen.
> //snip//


On a related, but not really helping with your problem note; What's the
point of the blank-screen screen-saver before the monitor is powered down?

In the post-CRT computer monitor era, I'd argue that any screensaver is a
total waste of energy and reduces the lifespan of the monitor. If it's not
in use because the machine has sat idle for some time, I think you should
just switch it off and forget about having a screensaver entirely.  The
sooner you turn off the back-light when the monitor is not being used, the
better.  LCD pixels kept in the same state on an LCD don't wear out and
LCDs don't suffer screen-burn like CRTs used to, so the screen-saver is
totally unnecessary for this.  Also, when a blank-screen screensaver is
activated, the back-light remains active unnecessarily using up some of its
finite lifetime.

Apart from for some marketing purpose if your monitor is facing your
potential customers, can anyone give me a good reason for the
continued existence of screen-savers since the screen-burn problem of CRTs
is a thing of the past?

Regards,

Patric

2012\05\16@070148 by Rodney Pont
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On Wed, 16 May 2012 20:13:53 +1200, RussellMc wrote:

>Machine 1
>?Dell Optiplex 760 with Dell E193FP monitor running at max native resolution of
>1280x1024
>?Intel 4 Series Internal Chipset, Video BIOS 1676.0

Just looked at the manual for this monitor and blanked with an amber
led gives the maximum power saving that you can get without switching
it off so I'd suggest just go to blanked screen. I'm assuming that the
monitor led goes amber when the screen goes blank.

If the led isn't going amber have a look at the control panel for the
graphics chip and see if there are any options to set no video and no
sync for power off on the monitor. It may be that it's just turning off
video but not v and h sync. Look around in Control Panel both Display
and the screen/display section in device manager. Sometimes you can
adjust what the driver does.

https://support.dell.com/support/edocs/monitors/E193FP/En/specs.htm

-- Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail        rpont (at) gmail (dot) com





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2012\05\16@082928 by RussellMc

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> Apart from for some marketing purpose if your monitor is facing your
> potential customers, can anyone give me a good reason for the
> continued existence of screen-savers since the screen-burn problem of CRTs
> is a thing of the past?

Displays some of a million of so photos when screen is not being
otherwise employed.
The longer it is since you were there, the better you remember it :-).


                          Russel

2012\05\17@060016 by cdb

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::LCD pixels kept in the same state on an LCD don't wear out and
::LCDs don't suffer screen-burn like CRTs used to.

Surprisingly this does happen. Amongst the varied things I repair are LCD monitors from the gaming industry, it is not unusual to see monitors with the game wheels burnt into them. I was amazed when I first saw this!

True these machines are switched on 18 hours a day 365 days a year, whilst this mainly occurs in monitors that have been in machines for 5 years or so, I have seen it in monitors as young as 3 years old.

In most cases it could be put down to the backlight being at it's highest level and the amount of heat generated by the machines  not helped by the glass in front of the LCD, but there are some monitors that have a toned down backlight and still manage to have screen burn.

LCD's are standard Samsung or LG 19" panels.

Colin
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cdb, colinspamKILLspambtech-online.co.uk on 17/05/2012
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