Searching \ for '[OT]:: $100.00' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=10000
Search entire site for: ': $100.00'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT]:: $100.00'
2007\04\24@132838 by Andre Abelian

flavicon
face
A little boy wanted $100.00 very badly and prayed for weeks, but nothing happened.
Then he decided to    
write God a letter requesting the $100.00.
 

When
The postal authorities received the letter to  God ,  USA , they decided to send it to the President.
The president was so amused that he instructed his secretary to send the little boy a $5.00 bill.
The president thought this would appear to be a lot of money to a little boy.
The little boy was delighted with the $5.00 bill and sat down to write a thank-you note to God, which read:

Dear God: Thank you very much for sending the money. However, I noticed that for some reason you sent it through Washington, DC., and those assholes deducted $95.00 in taxes.




2007\04\24@172934 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Andre Abelian wrote:
>A little boy wanted $100.00 very badly and prayed for weeks, but nothing
>happened.
> Then he decided to
> write God a letter requesting the $100.00.
>
>
> When
> The postal authorities received the letter to  God ,  USA , they decided
> to send it to the President.
> The president was so amused that he instructed his secretary to send the
> little boy a $5.00 bill.
> The president thought this would appear to be a lot of money to a little
> boy.
> The little boy was delighted with the $5.00 bill and sat down to write a
> thank-you note to God, which read:
>
> Dear God: Thank you very much for sending the money. However, I noticed
> that for some reason you sent it through Washington, DC., and those
> assholes deducted $95.00 in taxes.

US tax rates are much lower than most other countries', IIRC even Bill Gates
is only paying something like 37% (the maximum rate).

My economics professor told a story about his Swedish grandmother, who wrote
a best-selling book on knitting. She got 1% of the profit (amazingly, she
thought it was fair).

So I think the story would make more sense if it took place in Sweden. :)

Vitaliy

2007\04\24@173734 by PAUL James

picon face

I think it's geographically inert.  It's funny no matter where you live
or where you read it.

                                                       Jim

{Original Message removed}

2007\04\24@212237 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Vitaliy wrote:

> US tax rates are much lower than most other countries', IIRC even Bill Gates
> is only paying something like 37% (the maximum rate).

From
www.greaterzuricharea.ch/content/05/downloads/oecd_tax_revenue2003.pdf
(tax revenue as percentage of GDP, in 2003):

USA 25%
NZ 35%
UK 35%
Germany 36%
Sweden 51%

> My economics professor told a story about his Swedish grandmother, who
> wrote a best-selling book on knitting. She got 1% of the profit
> (amazingly, she thought it was fair).

IMO it's not that much about how much taxes, it's more about what is being
done with the taxes. The raw numbers don't say anything about the benefit
the population has from paying the taxes.

Gerhard

2007\04\24@220257 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
{Quote hidden}

At the risk of starting another economics-related thread and being sucked
into it... :)

Government is always less efficient at spending money, than the private
sector. It's just the nature of the beast (recall our recent Shuttle
software development discussion) -- those in the private sector who waste
money, are sooner or later self-destruct. What's worse, the government
always invents uses for the extra money it collects -- you often hear about
new taxes, but how often do you hear about tax repeals?

Government should only be providing services that are otherwise not possible
(e.g., police and national defense). It may also *carefully*, relying on the
advice of economists and not the opinion of the general public,  exercise
its power to adjust for externalities (both positive and negative): tax
polluters, subsidize vaccines, build public libraries, break up monopolies,
etc. That's it.

It's not the government's job to provide medical care, free college
education, or employment. I know the majority of people in Europe (and some
parts of Latin America) think otherwise, but being a majority does not make
them right.

-Vitaliy

2007\04\24@224149 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> At the risk of starting another economics-related thread and being
> sucked
> into it... :)

...

> education, or employment. I know the majority of people in Europe
> (and some
> parts of Latin America) think otherwise, but being a majority does
> not make
> them right.

That's certainly the right way to start one :-)



       Russell


2007\04\24@233844 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Apr 24, 2007, at 6:21 PM, Gerhard Fiedler wrote:

> http://www.greaterzuricharea.ch/content/05/downloads/
> oecd_tax_revenue2003.pdf
> (tax revenue as percentage of GDP, in 2003):

An interesting way of expressing the statistic, I guess.

> USA 25%
>
I wonder if it includes state taxes (~10% for me in Ca),
local taxes, social security (~11%), and medicare (~2%) ?

BillW

2007\04\25@003302 by Vitaliy
flavicon
face
Russell McMahon wrote:
>> At the risk of starting another economics-related thread and being
>> sucked
>> into it... :)
>
> ...
>
>> education, or employment. I know the majority of people in Europe
>> (and some
>> parts of Latin America) think otherwise, but being a majority does
>> not make
>> them right.
>
> That's certainly the right way to start one :-)

Is that in reference to me leaving out New Zealand? ;-)

Vitaliy

2007\04\25@010922 by Tony Smith

picon face
> At the risk of starting another economics-related thread and
> being sucked into it... :)
>
> Government is always less efficient at spending money, than
> the private sector. It's just the nature of the beast (recall
> our recent Shuttle software development discussion) -- those
> in the private sector who waste money, are sooner or later
> self-destruct. What's worse, the government always invents
> uses for the extra money it collects -- you often hear about
> new taxes, but how often do you hear about tax repeals?


We should have put Government in charge of the dot.com boom.  Sure, a lot of
money got wasted there (your definition of waste may vary), but imagine what
could have happened!

Tony

2007\04\25@015443 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Tony Smith wrote:
>> At the risk of starting another economics-related thread and
>> being sucked into it... :)
>>
>> Government is always less efficient at spending money, than
>> the private sector. It's just the nature of the beast (recall
>> our recent Shuttle software development discussion) -- those
>> in the private sector who waste money, are sooner or later
>> self-destruct. What's worse, the government always invents
>> uses for the extra money it collects -- you often hear about
>> new taxes, but how often do you hear about tax repeals?
>
> We should have put Government in charge of the dot.com boom.  Sure, a lot
> of
> money got wasted there (your definition of waste may vary), but imagine
> what
> could have happened!

I still have a "cat" from that era in my "odd things" box. The company that
produced it is long extinct.

By the way, sorry about the "are sooner or later self-destruct". It started
out as "are sooner or later eliminated" that I made an unsuccessful attempt
to change into "sooner or later self-destruct."

It's late, I'm going home. :)

Vitaliy

2007\04\25@020249 by wouter van ooijen

face picon face
> Government is always less efficient at spending money, than
> the private sector.

To all other list members: please do not feed the trolls.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu



2007\04\25@074535 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
William ChopsWestfield wrote:

>> http://www.greaterzuricharea.ch/content/05/downloads/
>> oecd_tax_revenue2003.pdf
>> (tax revenue as percentage of GDP, in 2003):
>
> An interesting way of expressing the statistic, I guess.
>
>> USA 25%
>>
> I wonder if it includes state taxes (~10% for me in Ca), local taxes,
> social security (~11%), and medicare (~2%) ?

Good question. It probably includes all federal taxes, but it may not
include state and local taxes -- which it should include, otherwise the
comparison is close to useless. I've seen other sites stating similar
numbers, which all seem to come from the same OECD numbers. I don't know
where they did their data get from.

Gerhard

2007\04\25@092314 by Matt Pobursky

flavicon
face
On Wed, 25 Apr 2007 08:43:42 -0300, Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
> William ChopsWestfield wrote:
>
>>> www.greaterzuricharea.ch/content/05/downloads/
>>> oecd_tax_revenue2003.pdf (tax revenue as percentage of GDP, in 2003):
>>>
>>
>> An interesting way of expressing the statistic, I guess.
>>
>>> USA 25%
>>>
>> I wonder if it includes state taxes (~10% for me in Ca), local taxes,
>> social security (~11%), and medicare (~2%) ?
>>
>
> Good question. It probably includes all federal taxes, but it may not
> include state and local taxes -- which it should include, otherwise the
> comparison is close to useless. I've seen other sites stating similar
> numbers, which all seem to come from the same OECD numbers. I don't know
> where they did their data get from.

Virtually *every* U.S. Government document I've seen citing Federal Tax
Rates NEVER include Social Security or Medicare "contributions". That's
right, the government calls them "contributions" vs. a tax, therefore they
are not a tax... ;-)

Of course every employer or self-employed person like myself is required by
the government to withold/pay them so to me it walks like a duck and quacks
like a duck.

If you add the additional 13-15% tax burden onto the ~25% base federal tax
rate, all of a sudden the U.S. federal tax rate doesn't look so good.

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems


2007\04\25@102226 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Wed, 2007-04-25 at 08:23 -0500, Matt Pobursky wrote:
> Virtually *every* U.S. Government document I've seen citing Federal Tax
> Rates NEVER include Social Security or Medicare "contributions". That's
> right, the government calls them "contributions" vs. a tax, therefore they
> are not a tax... ;-)
>
> Of course every employer or self-employed person like myself is required by
> the government to withold/pay them so to me it walks like a duck and quacks
> like a duck.
>
> If you add the additional 13-15% tax burden onto the ~25% base federal tax
> rate, all of a sudden the U.S. federal tax rate doesn't look so good.

Absolutely. Here in Ontario, Canada medical is included in the taxes, so
we don't see it, except of course for an additional "health tax" that
the latest government tacked on. Aside from that though, our Canada
pension plan is not counted as part of the "taxes", so contributions
there wouldn't be included, nor the employment insurance premiums we all
have to pay for.

Then there's sales tax, property taxes, alcohol taxes, petrol taxes,
etc.

It's one of those things that VERY hard to compare since where you "draw
the line" is up for debate.

Just like using the exchange rate to compare the power of a currency,
using the federal taxes rates to compare tax load is complete rubbish
IMHO. TTYL

2007\04\25@125826 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
wouter van ooijen wrote:
>> Government is always less efficient at spending money, than
>> the private sector.
>
> To all other list members: please do not feed the trolls.

Not sure what you mean, Wouter. Feel free to write me offline, and explain
why you feel my  statement above is not a valid topic for debate.

Vitaliy

2007\04\25@125950 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Matt Pobursky wrote:
> If you add the additional 13-15% tax burden onto the ~25% base federal tax
> rate, all of a sudden the U.S. federal tax rate doesn't look so good.

Any decent study should try to make a fair comparison (otherwise, you're
right -- the findings are pointless).

A Danish acquaitance reported that in Denmark, the average person ends up
paying 60% of their wages in taxes. That's not counting the 18% (IIRC) sales
tax on *everything* (including food).

Vitaliy

2007\04\25@131451 by Vasile Surducan

face picon face
On 4/24/07, wouter van ooijen <spam_OUTwouterTakeThisOuTspamvoti.nl> wrote:
> > Government is always less efficient at spending money, than
> > the private sector.
>
> To all other list members: please do not feed the trolls.

Please point to the sense of the sentece above hitting the number below:

troll [1]  (trohl)  v. <trolled, troll-ing> n.
             v.t.
                 1.  to sing or utter in a full, rolling voice.
                 2.  to sing in the manner of a round or catch.
                 3.  to fish in (a body of water) by trailing
                      a line behind a slow-moving boat.
                 4.  to cause to turn round and round; roll.
             v.i.
                 5.  to sing with a full, rolling voice; give
                      forth full, rolling tones.
                 6.  to be uttered or sounded in such tones.
                 7.  to fish by trolling.
                 8.  to roll; turn round and round.
                 9.  to move nimbly, as the tongue in speaking.
             n.
               10.  a song whose parts are sung in succession;
                      a round.
               11.  the act of trolling.
               12.  the lure or hook, with or without the
                      attached line, used in trolling.
            [1350-1400; ME: to roll, stroll; cf. MF troller to
            run here and there, MHG trollen to walk or run
            with short steps]
  Derived words
            --troll'er, n.

    troll [2]  (trohl)  n.
                 1.  (in Scandinavian folklore) any of a race
                      of supernatural beings, usu. hostile to
                      humans, who live underground or in caves.
            [1610-20; < ON troll demon]

2007\04\25@133329 by Martin Klingensmith

picon face
troll [2] 1. combined with troll [1] 7.


On 4/25/07, Vasile Surducan <.....piclist9KILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\04\25@134842 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> Please point to the sense of the sente(n)ce above hitting the number
> below:


Why, tis number 14 to be sure (or 1100), with 111 a fine allusion.



       TOTMTY*
                   Russell



* GK.


2007\04\25@134842 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> It's one of those things that VERY hard to compare since where you
> "draw
> the line" is up for debate.
>
> Just like using the exchange rate to compare the power of a
> currency,
> using the federal taxes rates to compare tax load is complete
> rubbish
> IMHO. TTYL

You need to use the international standard measure -

       How many minutes do you have to work to have enough
       money in your hand to buy a Big Mac (tm) ? *


       Russell

* But, then you'd have to eat it :-(.


2007\04\25@143232 by Vidal

flavicon
face
Vitaliy wrote:

>Matt Pobursky wrote:
>  
>
>>If you add the additional 13-15% tax burden onto the ~25% base federal tax
>>rate, all of a sudden the U.S. federal tax rate doesn't look so good.
>>    
>>
>
>Any decent study should try to make a fair comparison (otherwise, you're
>right -- the findings are pointless).
>
>A Danish acquaitance reported that in Denmark, the average person ends up
>paying 60% of their wages in taxes. That's not counting the 18% (IIRC) sales
>tax on *everything* (including food).
>
>  
>
Not the average person, but the above average earner.

I guess all in all the average tax is between 30 and 40 % *not*
counting consumertax on everything 25%..

But then all medical help and education is free and the social safety net.
is rather effective, if  reduced, though, during the latter years under the
rightwing governement coalition.

Regards

Vidal

2007\04\25@144152 by Dwayne Reid

flavicon
face
At 11:41 AM 4/25/2007, Russell McMahon wrote:

>You need to use the international standard measure -
>
>         How many minutes do you have to work to have enough
>         money in your hand to buy a Big Mac (tm) ? *

The above is only half the equation.  The other half is:

How many Big Mac (tm) hamburgers can you purchase after you've paid
all your taxes and living expenses.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <.....dwaynerKILLspamspam.....planet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

Celebrating 22 years of Engineering Innovation (1984 - 2006)
 .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-
    `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'
Do NOT send unsolicited commercial email to this email address.
This message neither grants consent to receive unsolicited
commercial email nor is intended to solicit commercial email.

2007\04\25@144853 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


>-----Original Message-----
>From: EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu [piclist-bouncesspamspam_OUTmit.edu]
>On Behalf Of Dwayne Reid
>Sent: 25 April 2007 19:39
>To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
>Subject: Re: [OT]:: $100.00
>
>
>At 11:41 AM 4/25/2007, Russell McMahon wrote:
>
>>You need to use the international standard measure -
>>
>>         How many minutes do you have to work to have enough
>>         money in your hand to buy a Big Mac (tm) ? *
>
>The above is only half the equation.  The other half is:
>
>How many Big Mac (tm) hamburgers can you purchase after you've paid
>all your taxes and living expenses.

And will the state health insurance cover you for eating a  big mac? :)

Mike

=======================================================================
This e-mail is intended for the person it is addressed to only. The
information contained in it may be confidential and/or protected by
law. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must
not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
person. Please contact us immediately to tell us that you have
received this e-mail, and return the original to us. Any use,
forwarding, printing or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.
No part of this message can be considered a request for goods or
services.
=======================================================================

2007\04\25@151633 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Vidal wrote:
>>A Danish acquaitance reported that in Denmark, the average person ends up
>>paying 60% of their wages in taxes. That's not counting the 18% (IIRC)
>>sales
>>tax on *everything* (including food).
>>
> Not the average person, but the above average earner.
>
> I guess all in all the average tax is between 30 and 40 % *not*
> counting consumertax on everything 25%..
>
> But then all medical help and education is free and the social safety net.
> is rather effective, if  reduced, though, during the latter years under
> the
> rightwing governement coalition.

Yes, the same guy told me how the "unemployed" get an equivalent of USD$10,
then get paid under the table for working odd jobs.

It it's true, I would consider the safety net to be rather ineffective, and
very unfair.

Vitaliy

2007\04\25@162826 by wouter van ooijen

face picon face
> troll [2] 1. combined with troll [1] 7.

correct. or, in more words: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_troll

Vitality: sorry, I decline your offer. No troll food in the fridge here.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu



2007\04\25@173503 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
wouter van ooijen wrote:
>> troll [2] 1. combined with troll [1] 7.
>
> correct. or, in more words: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_troll
>
> Vitality: sorry, I decline your offer. No troll food in the fridge here.

My name is Vitaliy.

2007\04\26@003720 by Vasile Surducan

face picon face
On 4/25/07, wouter van ooijen <@spam@wouterKILLspamspamvoti.nl> wrote:
> > troll [2] 1. combined with troll [1] 7.
>
> correct. or, in more words: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_troll

Ohh, understand now. I'ts like "making waves in a plate with soup".
I must admit that  I like such messages because those are "scratching"
the piclists vanity. Most of the time I'm trying to define the
personality of the people being behind the answer, based on those
human reaction. It's much more interesting than follow the subject
itself, mostly because 90% of the questions are easy and the list has
already a bunch of answers. It seems nobody search for those answers
on old posts...

Vasile


{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\04\26@092455 by Mauricio Giovagnini

flavicon
face
Andre Abelian... funny joke!! you make me laugh.

Gerhard Fiedler escribió:
> From
> www.greaterzuricharea.ch/content/05/downloads/oecd_tax_revenue2003.pdf
> (tax revenue as percentage of GDP, in 2003):
>
> USA 25%
> NZ 35%
> UK 35%
> Germany 36%
> Sweden 51%
Michael Schumacher, the 7 times F1 world champion earned about 50
millions per year in the last 5 years.  35 only is his "annual income as
a pilot" , the rest comes from publicity and other contracts.

He decided to move to Sweden because he said that German taxes were
really a lot, so we should analyze what is this 36% to 51% being considered.

In my country (Argentina) we just don't know how much taxes we pay
because you pay for everything.  Everything has taxes everywhere, taxes
that you can't use to reduce your 'income taxes'.  I mean , you pay for
your annual income some taxes, but the other taxes you pay CANT be
deduced...

2007\04\26@093830 by Dario Greggio

face picon face
Mauricio Giovagnini wrote:


> In my country (Argentina) we just don't know how much taxes we pay
> because you pay for everything.  Everything has taxes everywhere, taxes
> that you can't use to reduce your 'income taxes'.  I mean , you pay for
> your annual income some taxes, but the other taxes you pay CANT be
> deduced...


Why does it look exactly like Italy?? :-)

--
Ciao, Dario
--
ADPM Synthesis sas - Torino
--
http://www.adpm.tk

2007\04\26@103008 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Mauricio Giovagnini wrote:

>> From
>> www.greaterzuricharea.ch/content/05/downloads/oecd_tax_revenue2003.pdf
>> (tax revenue as percentage of GDP, in 2003):
>>
>> USA 25%
>> NZ 35%
>> UK 35%
>> Germany 36%
>> Sweden 51%

> Michael Schumacher, the 7 times F1 world champion earned about 50
> millions per year in the last 5 years.  35 only is his "annual income as
> a pilot" , the rest comes from publicity and other contracts.
>
> He decided to move to Sweden because he said that German taxes were
> really a lot, so we should analyze what is this 36% to 51% being
> considered.

Without considering the doubt about what exactly is included in those
numbers and assuming that they contain all local, state, federal, health,
... in short everything that's collected by any government in the country,
there's always the thing that they are average numbers, not individual
numbers.

For example, a typical self-employed (sole proprietor) in the USA pays more
taxes than her equivalent in Germany ("Selbständige"). This is due to the
fact that a US sole proprietor is required to pay social security, whereas
the German Selbständige is allowed to handle this part as she pleases --
pay into the government system, use a private insurance, pile up huge
savings, do nothing at all... This more than offsets the lower income tax
in the USA for most.

Gerhard

2007\04\26@160019 by Mauricio Giovagnini

flavicon
face


Dario Greggio escribió:
> Mauricio Giovagnini wrote:
>
>
>  
>> In my country (Argentina) we just don't know how much taxes we pay
>> because you pay for everything.  Everything has taxes everywhere, taxes
>> that you can't use to reduce your 'income taxes'.  I mean , you pay for
>> your annual income some taxes, but the other taxes you pay CANT be
>> deduced...
>>    
>
>
> Why does it look exactly like Italy?? :-)
>
>  
May be because wer are plenty of italians :) (me included, hehehe)

2007\04\26@175131 by Cristóvão Dalla Costa

picon face
On 4/26/07, Mauricio Giovagnini <KILLspammaugiovagniniKILLspamspamyahoo.com.ar> wrote:
>
> Michael Schumacher, the 7 times F1 world champion earned about 50
> millions per year in the last 5 years.  35 only is his "annual income as
> a pilot" , the rest comes from publicity and other contracts.
>
> He decided to move to Sweden because he said that German taxes were
> really a lot, so we should analyze what is this 36% to 51% being
> considered.


Are you sure about that? All F1 pilots live in fiscal paradises such as
Monaco and Liechtenstein.

2007\04\26@211705 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Cristóvão Dalla Costa wrote:

> On 4/26/07, Mauricio Giovagnini <RemoveMEmaugiovagniniTakeThisOuTspamyahoo.com.ar> wrote:
>>
>> Michael Schumacher, the 7 times F1 world champion earned about 50
>> millions per year in the last 5 years.  35 only is his "annual income as
>> a pilot" , the rest comes from publicity and other contracts.
>>
>> He decided to move to Sweden because he said that German taxes were
>> really a lot, so we should analyze what is this 36% to 51% being
>> considered.
>
> Are you sure about that? All F1 pilots live in fiscal paradises such as
> Monaco and Liechtenstein.

Here <www.humanistische-aktion.homepage.t-online.de/steuern.htm>
they say that he lives in Switzerland: it is with 30% in the earlier cited
tax summary on the opposite side of Sweden in Europe.

Gerhard

2007\04\27@040549 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
> Are you sure about that? All F1 pilots live in fiscal paradises such as
> Monaco and Liechtenstein.

Wrong.

Fernando Alonso lives in the UK, while he was at Renault he lived in Oxford
(the Renault F1 factory is 3-4 miles NW of Oxford). I assume he still lives
there now he is at McLaren. AFAIK Lewis Hamilton hasn't moved his residency
out of the UK yet,

Ralf Schumacher lives in Austria, close to the German border, as mentioned
in the link given previously by Gerhard.


2007\04\27@064747 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
>> Are you sure about that? All F1 pilots live in fiscal paradises
>> such as
>> Monaco and Liechtenstein.

Unrelated to $ directly, but related to "F1 pilots".

Interesting "fact":    Top racing drivers generally do NOT have
appreciably faster reaction times than the bulk of the population.



       Russell


2007\04\28@090441 by Mauricio Giovagnini

flavicon
face
It was my mistake.  Its "Switzerland", not Sweden.

And to be "sure" 100% I ought to be an employee of the Switzerlnand
government, to check if he really
has residence in papers, and not just "having permament hollidays there"
:-) ;-)

Cristóvão Dalla Costa escribió:
{Quote hidden}

>

2007\04\28@090638 by Mauricio Giovagnini

flavicon
face


Gerhard Fiedler escribió:
{Quote hidden}

Yes Gerhard, it was my mistake as I posted it in another mail.   Its
because Sweden and Switzerland, sound
very similar in spanish and I mistyped it.  

Sweden = Suecia
Switzerland = Suiza

And in spanish you pronounce them almost the same.

2007\04\28@153521 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Mauricio Giovagnini wrote:

> And to be "sure" 100% I ought to be an employee of the Switzerlnand
> government, to check if he really
> has residence in papers, and not just "having permament hollidays there"

I'm pretty sure the members of the German fiscal administration did that
for you :) -- if he's just on "permanent vacation", he would have to pay
German taxes, so I'm rather certain that he had to prove that he doesn't
have to.

Gerhard

2007\04\30@071850 by Mauricio Giovagnini

flavicon
face
Gerhard Fiedler escribió:
> Mauricio Giovagnini wrote:
>
>  
>> And to be "sure" 100% I ought to be an employee of the Switzerlnand
>> government, to check if he really
>> has residence in papers, and not just "having permament hollidays there"
>>    
>
> I'm pretty sure the members of the German fiscal administration did that
> for you :) -- if he's just on "permanent vacation", he would have to pay
> German taxes, so I'm rather certain that he had to prove that he doesn't
> have to.
>
> Gerhard
>
>  

Yes, that's what governments do best... pursuing people to pay taxes 8-)

2007\04\30@123949 by Chris McSweeny

picon face
Just to bring back the strands of this thread - they do that a lot better
than private organisations.

On 4/30/07, Mauricio Giovagnini <RemoveMEmaugiovagninispamTakeThisOuTyahoo.com.ar> wrote:
>
> Yes, that's what governments do best... pursuing people to pay taxes 8-)
> -

2007\04\30@162828 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Chris McSweeny wrote:

>> Yes, that's what governments do best... pursuing people to pay taxes 8-)
>
> Just to bring back the strands of this thread - they do that a lot better
> than private organisations.

Now that is probably not agreed upon unanimously. Private organizations are
pretty good about pursuing their debtors, too... I'd rather not owe a loan
shark or a bank :)

Gerhard

2007\04\30@164833 by peter green

flavicon
face
part 1 1007 bytes content-type:text/plain; (unknown type 8bit not decoded)



{Quote hidden}

or the mafia........

whatever some people say governements do not have a monopoly on the use of force
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.6.2/780 - Release Date: 29/04/2007 06:30




part 2 35 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
(decoded 7bit)


'[OT]:: $100.00'
2007\05\01@082935 by Chris McSweeny
picon face
Yeah, but at least the mafia don't issue confusing forms and have confusing
rules, then fine you if you make a mistake, but take ages to resolve
mistakes they make (and give you no compensation).

On 4/30/07, peter green <RemoveMEplugwashspam_OUTspamKILLspamp10link.net> wrote:
>
>
>
> > {Original Message removed}

2007\05\01@093008 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Chris McSweeny wrote:

> Yeah, but at least the mafia don't issue confusing forms and have
> confusing rules, then fine you if you make a mistake, but take ages to
> resolve mistakes they make

Like in
- "chef, i killed joe by mistake and carl saw me; what should i do?"
- "kill carl and make sure that noone sees you this time."

Sure sounds faster...

> (and give you no compensation).

I think I could believe better this if I ever met one who has received a
compensation for a mistake the mafia made :)

Gerhard

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2007 , 2008 only
- Today
- New search...