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'[OT: ] Any good site to discuss and learn car repa'
2004\08\16@215700 by john chung

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I think I have to learn it myself since the mechanics at my area are
pretty hopeless

Thank you,
John Chung

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2004\08\16@225005 by Robert Ussery

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Very much depends on what kind of car u have. What do u own? Many cars have
literally hundreds of websites devoted to them.


- Robert

>{Original Message removed}

2004\08\17@001828 by john chung

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A toyota corona. 1984.

Thank you,
John



Robert Ussery wrote:

>Very much depends on what kind of car u have. What do u own? Many cars have
>literally hundreds of websites devoted to them.
>
>
>- Robert
>
>
>
>>{Original Message removed}

2004\08\17@003637 by Robert Ussery

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I didn't find any good Toyota Corona sites through a quick google, but there
are a number of good manuals out there. I'd say you should get a good shop
manual and find a friend experienced with cars. Start with easy stuff, and
then work your way up.

Have fun!

- Robert


>-----Original Message-----
>On Behalf Of john chung
>A toyota corona. 1984.
>
>Thank you,
>John

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2004\08\17@080043 by Josh Koffman

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I found the Haynes manuals to be great when repairing my Ford trucks.
Of course, I no longer have them due to a relationship split. Ah the
joys of real life :)

Anyway, check your local library for the manuals. You can then peruse
them, decide if they are useful, and purchase them, which is what I
did. Nothing is worse that forgetting a wiring diagram at 11PM when
the libraries are closed. The manuals are relatively cheap, under
USD$20.

Josh
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On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 00:37:00 -0400, Robert Ussery <.....uavscienceKILLspamspam@spam@frii.com> wrote:
> I didn't find any good Toyota Corona sites through a quick google, but there
> are a number of good manuals out there. I'd say you should get a good shop
> manual and find a friend experienced with cars. Start with easy stuff, and
> then work your way up.

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2004\08\17@093517 by Eisermann, Phil [Ridg/CO]

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pic microcontroller discussion list wrote:
> I found the Haynes manuals to be great when repairing my Ford trucks.
> Of course, I no longer have them due to a relationship split. Ah the
> joys of real life :)

I agree, the best place to start is with a shop manual. I bought the
Haynes manual, then borrowed the Chilton's from my local library.
Personally, I prefer Chilton to Haynes. Haynes has more pictures,
but a lot less detail. The Chilton's is full of drawings that make
things much clearer IMO and IME.

Next step is to get the tools you need for the job. Then just
dive right in and do it. It isn't hard at all if you have any
sort of mechanical inclination. It's hard the first time only
because you have never done it, sort of like riding a bicycle.

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2004\08\17@095627 by Josh Koffman

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In my family, I was the most technically adept person around, so
working on cars wasn't something I grew up with. It wasn't until I
started spending time down in the US that I had a vehicle that needed
fixing, and had access to tools and information that showed me it
wasn't that hard. I learned a lot from doing things like changing
spark plugs, brakes, brake lines, my radiator, a seat, tailgate,
adding cruise control, and doing a transmission service (along with
other stuff). Once I read the manuals and sort of figured out how
things went in my mind, it didn't seem too difficult. Certain things
I'd still go to a mechanic for if needed though. I found that by
fixing some things myself, I became more in tune with how my truck was
performing. I could tell when something was wrong.

Josh
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On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 09:34:16 -0400, Eisermann, Phil [Ridg/CO]
<EraseMEpeisermaspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTridgid.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2004\08\17@160216 by William Chops Westfield

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On Aug 17, 2004, at 6:34 AM, Eisermann, Phil [Ridg/CO] wrote:

> Next step is to get the tools you need for the job. Then just
> dive right in and do it.

Sharp moving metal parts.  Heavy parts (hundreds of pounds.)  60+
horses waiting to kick you when you're not paying attention to the
right thing.  Massive legal issues...  There are some things where just
reading the manuals might not be enough.  I think I'll stick to
software.

BillW

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2004\08\17@225204 by john chung

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Thanks to all that replied my mail. Looks like I have to read the manual
of my car
before I dwell further into my car.

Any good sites to get car repair tools?


Thank you,
John

Josh Koffman wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2004\08\18@092334 by Dave Lag

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If you are going to fix cars you will break tools - sockets, wrenches etc.
eventually.
Sears half price (or better) sales plus life-time warranty begin to look
attractive.
- just having gotten a 20yr old socket wrench replaced!

Nobody mentioned the factory shop manuals-expensive but sometimes required
details , exploded views etc . Start out with the others, chilton etc

D
At 10:47 PM 8/17/04, you wrote:
>Thanks to all that replied my mail. Looks like I have to read the manual
>of my car
>before I dwell further into my car.
>Any good sites to get car repair tools?
>Thank you,
>John

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2004\08\18@093618 by Martin Klingensmith

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> Thanks to all that replied my mail. Looks like I have to read the manual
> of my car
> before I dwell further into my car.
>
> Any good sites to get car repair tools?
>
>
> Thank you,
> John

http://www.sears.com
http://www.snap-on.com
If you feel lucky: http://www.harborfreight.com

You will need at bare minimum a socket set with a lot of metric sizes plus
specialized tools depending on what you want to do.
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wwia.org

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2004\08\18@095333 by Matt Redmond

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I second the vote for Sear Craftsman tools.   They'll replace any hand tool
for ANY reason whatsoever - even if you break it through misuse (screwdriver
as pry-bar, etc...).  They recently replaced a screwdriver whose handle my
dog chewed to shreds!

You'll find that to do virtually anything to your car, the following tools
will be sufficient:

       A 3/8" ratchet and either metric or standard sockets from 6mm to
17mm (or the equivalent standard sizes) and a spark plug socket of the
appropriate size.

       A set of box-end wrenches in the same sizes (open-end slip too
easily IMO)

       A set of philips-head screwdrivers.

The only thing I can think of that I couldn't do to my car with the above is
remove the crank pulley to change the timing belt.  This requires an impact
wrench.

Also note that anything involving removing major parts of the engine
(manifolds, head(s), etc...) will require a torque wrench for proper
reinstallation.





{Original Message removed}

2004\08\18@100820 by Matt Redmond

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I should add that there are other tools that could be needed for very
specific purposes - for example: snap ring pliers, pulley pullers, pickle
fork (for popping ball joints).  The need for these is fairly infrequent but
when you need them, no other tool is a good substitute.  These are
buy-as-you-go items IMO.  The better service manuals will tell you when
you'll need them.




{Original Message removed}

2004\08\18@112745 by Todd McClendon

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Alot of the specialty tools, like balljoint pullers and flywheel pullers,
among others, are usually avaliable for loan from your local auto parts
store. It usually requires a fully refundable deposit. It beats wrapping a
lot of money up in specialty tools.

Todd

{Original Message removed}

2004\08\18@112953 by Randy Abernathy

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In a message dated 8/18/2004 9:37:50 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
martinEraseMEspam.....NNYTECH.NET writes:

Any good  sites to get car repair tools?



Try AutoZone, Wal-Mart, Sears, Advance Auto Parts, Pep Boys.   All of these
carry both junk and some good quality tools as well.  Also,  Home Depot and
Lowes carry a good line of hand tools and power tools.

I was a professional mechanic for over 10 years and still do all of my own
auto repairs, I do everything from normal maint. all the way to rebuilding the
engines and transmissions, that includes automatic transmission.  I found
the the Craftsman brand of tools is the best bang for the buck.  They are
strong, feel good in the hand, have a lifetime warranty that Sears will actually
back and they are reasonable in cost.  On the other hand, I have Snap-on,
Proto, MAC, and others as well.  I found that the ones I just mentioned  tend to
be overpriced for the quality.  S-K Wayne was also another  very good quality
tool for the money but these are not as easy to find anymore  and I don't know
if they are still the same quality as they once  were.

Randy  Abernathy
4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101-4066
Phone /  Fax: 770-974-5295
Cell: 678-772-4113
E-mail: EraseMECnc002spamaol.com

I  furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for
the SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with
my  extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and
CNC  machinery to offer you needed support for your  machinery.

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2004\08\18@113539 by Randy Abernathy

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In a message dated 8/18/2004 9:24:52 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
RemoveMEdavescomputerspam_OUTspamKILLspamROGERS.COM writes:

Nobody  mentioned the factory shop manuals-expensive but sometimes required
details  , exploded views etc . Start out with the others, chilton  etc



The factory manuals are the best.  They are pricey but they  contain
information that you can find ONLY in them, in many cases.  I only  purchase used
vehicles and the first thing I do is order the factory service  manuals for them.
These are not the user manuals that come with the car  but technical manuals.
They may be in several different volumes.  If  you have an older GM car, say
over 10 years old, you will have to go through a  third party company to get
these, I think it is Hunt publishing, and you will  have to order all of the
volumes for your car.  They break these down into  transmission, chassis,
engine, electrical, etc.  They may have one that  includes a small snippet for each
of these but not the complete  information.

Randy  Abernathy
4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101-4066
Phone /  Fax: 770-974-5295
Cell: 678-772-4113
E-mail: RemoveMECnc002TakeThisOuTspamspamaol.com

I  furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for
the SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with
my  extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and
CNC  machinery to offer you needed support for your  machinery.

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2004\08\18@120239 by Matt Redmond

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To add to what Randy said about the factory manuals:  In my experience (Honda/Acura only), the manuals also specify the order in which parts can/should be removed, which can make a job a lot faster / easier.  For example, you might be inclined to remove a part unneccesarily because it looks like it might prevent you from removing a this-or-that.  The manual might tell you instead to rotate the this-or-that and pull it out from below the engine instead of out the top like you thought you might.  If that makes sense <g>.




{Quote hidden}

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2004\08\18@120902 by Randy Abernathy

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In a message dated 8/18/2004 12:04:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
@spam@mdredmond@spam@spamspam_OUTCHARTER.NET writes:

To add  to what Randy said about the factory manuals:  In my experience
(Honda/Acura only), the manuals also specify the order in which parts  can/should
be removed, which can make a job a lot faster / easier.  For  example, you
might be inclined to remove a part unneccesarily because it looks  like it might
prevent you from removing a this-or-that.  The manual might  tell you instead
to rotate the this-or-that and pull it out from below the  engine instead of
out the top like you thought you might.  If that makes  sense <g>.



Not only does it make sense, most of the FACTORY manuals do  this.  One
reason is that the dealers charge based upon a standard repair  time chart and if
they can cut down on the time it takes to make a given repair,  then they are
money ahead.  The auto manufacturers know this and they make  it a bit easier
if they can.  Also, it gives them some ammunition in only  allowing a given
amount of time/money to do a warranty repair at the  dealers.  If that makes
sense as well <g>

Randy  Abernathy
4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101-4066
Phone /  Fax: 770-974-5295
Cell: 678-772-4113
E-mail: spamBeGoneCnc002spamKILLspamaol.com

I  furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for
the SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with
my  extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and
CNC  machinery to offer you needed support for your  machinery.

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2004\08\18@140108 by Herbert Graf

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On Wed, 2004-08-18 at 11:36, Randy Abernathy wrote:

> The factory manuals are the best.  They are pricey but they  contain
> information that you can find ONLY in them, in many cases.  I only  purchase used
> vehicles and the first thing I do is order the factory service  manuals for them.
> These are not the user manuals that come with the car  but technical manuals.
>  They may be in several different volumes.  If  you have an older GM car, say
> over 10 years old, you will have to go through a  third party company to get
> these, I think it is Hunt publishing, and you will  have to order all of the
> volumes for your car.  They break these down into  transmission, chassis,
> engine, electrical, etc.  They may have one that  includes a small snippet for each
> of these but not the complete  information.

I absolutely second that. I wouldn't even touch a car these days without
the full shop manual in hand. They are VERY handy for general stuff, and
absolutely essential for other stuff (i.e. a job that may take hours of
tracing may be finished in minutes if you have the wiring diagrams in
hand). Heck, installing a keyless entry system in my car was thousands
of times easier since I had the location of every wire, in every part of
the car, along with every pin of every connector available to me.

Shop manuals are expensive if buying new. For the newest cars
unfortunately that's probably your only choice. For older cars used shop
manuals can often be found very cheap on Ebay (usually from dealships or
mechanic's shops that closed down). I don't remember what I paid for
mine, but it was a great deal.

Note also that you often don't need to find the manual for the EXACT
same car you have, usually cars a year older or newer are similar
enough. For example, the shop manual I have is for an 87 Buick Park
Avenue/Electra, and it's been perfect for everything I've looked for
related to my 88 Olds Delta 88. TTYL

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2004\08\18@171423 by Randy Abernathy

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In a message dated 8/18/2004 2:02:39 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
TakeThisOuTmailinglist2KILLspamspamspamFARCITE.NET writes:

Shop  manuals are expensive if buying new. For the newest cars
unfortunately  that's probably your only choice. For older cars used shop
manuals can  often be found very cheap on Ebay (usually from dealships or
mechanic's  shops that closed down). I don't remember what I paid for
mine, but it was  a great deal.



True, they are fairly expensive, however, the manuals for my 1988 Dodge
Grand Caravan were only $88.00 USD.  Cheap when you consider how much it  saves me
on repairs.

For the most part, you can get the factory manuals for autos for between
$50.00 USD and $200.00 USD depending on how new the vehicle is and who
manufactured it.  Even $200.00 isn't all that much when you could save over  $1,000.00
when your automatic transmission goes out.  A re-conditioned  automatic
transaxle for my '88 Grand Caravan is over $1,200.00 the kit to  re-build it is
around $100.00 USD and it takes about 2 days, including pulling  it then putting
it back in.   Another plus is that you know it was  done correctly.

Randy  Abernathy
4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101-4066
Phone /  Fax: 770-974-5295
Cell: 678-772-4113
E-mail: .....Cnc002spamRemoveMEaol.com

I  furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for
the SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with
my  extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and
CNC  machinery to offer you needed support for your  machinery.

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2004\08\19@124924 by Peter L. Peres

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>Certain things I'd still go to a mechanic for if needed though. I found
>that by fixing some things myself, I became more in tune with how my
>truck was performing. I could tell when something was wrong.

I think that by the time you have the tools to *properly* handle all
fastenings and adjustments on your car you need 1 garage just to hold the
tools (even not counting the electronic jigs). Exceptions assumed for cars
built *not* to need that (like old Willis Jeeps and equivalents for
example).

Peter

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2004\08\19@220642 by john chung

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Matt Redmond wrote:

>To add to what Randy said about the factory manuals:  In my experience (Honda/Acura only), the manuals also specify the order in which parts can/should be removed, which can make a job a lot faster / easier.  For example, you might be inclined to remove a part unneccesarily because it looks like it might prevent you from removing a this-or-that.  The manual might tell you instead to rotate the this-or-that and pull it out from below the engine instead of out the top like you thought you might.  If that makes sense <g>.
>
>
>
>

   Yes it makes a lot of sense <g>. Well, thanks to all that are
helpful with my questions! You
guys are the BEST!

John

{Quote hidden}

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2004\08\20@220049 by Ryan Underwood

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On Wed, Aug 18, 2004 at 11:30:16AM -0400, Randy Abernathy wrote:
> auto repairs, I do everything from normal maint. all the way to rebuilding the
> engines and transmissions, that includes automatic transmission.

Randy, do you have advice or pointers on how to get started with
rebuilding automatic transmissions?

--
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2004\08\21@001804 by Martin Klingensmith

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Ryan Underwood wrote:
> On Wed, Aug 18, 2004 at 11:30:16AM -0400, Randy Abernathy wrote:
>
>>auto repairs, I do everything from normal maint. all the way to rebuilding the
>>engines and transmissions, that includes automatic transmission.
>
>
> Randy, do you have advice or pointers on how to get started with
> rebuilding automatic transmissions?

Good luck?
sorry :)


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2004\08\21@115204 by Randy Abernathy

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In a message dated 8/20/2004 10:02:09 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
@spam@nemesis-listsspam_OUTspam.....ICEQUAKE.NET writes:

Randy,  do you have advice or pointers on how to get started with
rebuilding  automatic transmissions?



I was lucky and had training from professionals.  But you can  start by
working on a transmission that you don't particularly have to worry  whether it
works the first time or not.  I would recommend that you get the  Haynes
Automatic Transmission manual for the specific one you wish to  rebuild.  They do not
publish manuals for all of the trannys out there so  pick one that they do.
Their manuals for this are very good and  detailed.  You could also bite the
bullet and purchase the complete set of  service manuals for the vehicle on
which you wish to work.  However, the  cost of the factory service manuals could
well exceed the cost of the parts to  rebuild the transmission.  Take the
transmission apart one section at a  time and keep all of the parts together for
that section, i.e. valve body,  clutch pack assemblies, band(s), servo units,
etc.  This makes it much  easier to go back together.  You then dis-assemble
each section and replace  the parts needed, doing one at a time.  Then you
re-assemble the  transmission one section at a time in the reverse order of
dis-assembling  them.

There are some transmissions that do not lend themselves to this process
however.  The 4 speed overdrive transmissions from GM are among  these.  I would
suggest that you start with a regular 3 speed automatic  first, if you have
that option.

I hope this helps and E-mail me at the address below directly if I can help
you further.


Randy  Abernathy
4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101-4066
Phone /  Fax: 770-974-5295
Mobile: 678-772-4113
E-mail:  spamBeGonecnc002EraseMEspamaol.com

I furnish technical support, repair, and other  related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as  Senior Service Engineer for
the SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory  training, combines with
my extensive background in electronics, mechanics,  pneumatics, electrical and
CNC machinery to offer you needed support for your  machinery.

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2004\08\23@030030 by Andrew Warren

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Randy Abernathy <PICLISTspamBeGonespammitvma.mit.edu> wrote:

> Take the transmission apart one section at a  time [.... do a bunch of
> stuff....] Then you re-assemble the transmission one section at a time
> in the reverse order of dis-assembling  them.

   I would add that -- while it's not as necessary with a transmission
   as with a motor -- having a scrupulously-clean workplace is never a
   bad thing.

   Oh, and you might find it helpful to take lots of digicam photos as
   you disassemble the thing; it'll make it easier to put back together
   (plus it'll give you a nice slideshow to bore your friends with).

   And you should have a good set of calipers and an accurate torque
   wrench.

   And while the tranny's out of the car, take the opportunity to
   inspect/replace any newly-accessible seals, boots, joints, etc.

   And use jackstands.  And properly dispose of the used transmission
   fluid.  And don't run with scissors.

   -Andrew

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=== Principal Design Engineer
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