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'[OT:] Impressive lighting effects'
2005\12\14@034441 by Denny Esterline

picon face
This must be what happens when an engineer has too much time on his hands.


http://members.cox.net/transam57/lights.wmv

2005\12\14@042442 by Jinx

face picon face
> This must be what happens when an engineer has too
> much time on his hands

How do I get to be one of these mythical engineers with too
much time on his hands ? 8-))

Cool video, thanks. Incredible

2005\12\14@045839 by Denny Esterline

picon face
> > This must be what happens when an engineer has too
> > much time on his hands
>
> How do I get to be one of these mythical engineers with too
> much time on his hands ? 8-))

Simple really, divorce the wife, abandon the kids, move away from your
parents/siblings/friends, quit your job, turn off you phones, unplug the
internet connection, etc, etc.

You'll definitely have more free time, no grantees you'll enjoy it though.

Of course that assumes you've already figured out how to become an engineer
:-)

-Denny

2005\12\14@051318 by Jinx

face picon face
> Of course that assumes you've already figured out how to become an
engineer

Hey, once upon a time I couldn't even spell engineer - now I are one

2005\12\14@080338 by Dave Lag

picon face
Jinx wrote:
>>Of course that assumes you've already figured out how to become an
>
> engineer
>
> Hey, once upon a time I couldn't even spell engineer - now I are one
>
You worked for the railway too?
;)

2005\12\14@081601 by GS

picon face
Maybe it would be better to do these kind of works as a profession...

Here is the link,

http://www.elementlabs.com/news/2005_February_RoundPixels.htm

Watch the demo...

2005\12\14@084526 by Dave Lag

picon face

> Lindy:
> Was the music original, do you think?  I didn't recognize it at all.
> I'm curious, on a high level, how'd he do that?

This thing has become like spam, here are "facts" what I sent to my
relatives who ALL sent it to me claiming it was their house.
:)

also check christmas lights threadpiclist november
D
......snip.......


OK , here are some more details of your  setup :
..................

in case you missed it:
video
http://members.cox.net/transam57/lights.wmv


http://www.snopes.com/photos/arts/xmaslights.asp

www.wonderlandchristmas.com/wizardsofwinter.php
.....
.... snip ....

This is definitely not a hoax. This guy lives about 3 miles from where I
work. We were up near there at lunch today so decided to stop by and
check it out. He had taken the day off of work and was out front working
on his holiday setup for this year. They guy was way cool and even took
us into his garage to see all the software and hardware that runs the
show. One of my co-workers lives in the same neighborhood and is going
to spend some more time over there to learn about getting started on a
smaller scale. And believe it or not, he does the whole show with a 40
amp service.

Final cool thing is that the Trans-Siberian Orchestra called him
yesterday and offered him free tickets to their next show in Cincinnati
with backstage passes and everything. How's that for quick fame?

....

Responding to #46: That's the guy and you can find his address easily if
you do a bit of detective work (took me 10 seconds). He was a bit
distraught that his old address and his correct phone number were posted
on the internet.

Correction: His is no longer using Light-O-Rama controllers though he
was in that particular video. He still uses their software, but the
solid state relay boards are custom pieces done for him by his
electrical engineer brother-in-law. Each board will handle 96 circuits
and offers ramped dimming effects that the original L-O-R boards did
not. He broadcasts on FM 96.9 using a cheapy FM PCI card with a wire
antenna hanging out of the back of the PC. I wish I had had my camera
along last week so you could see how this thing's wired. The effect is
very, very cool but his "behind the scenes" stuff is a bit chaotic. :-)


......

2005\12\14@104632 by M Graff

flavicon
face
Dave Lag wrote:
> He still uses their software, but the
> solid state relay boards are custom pieces done for him by his
> electrical engineer brother-in-law. Each board will handle 96 circuits
> and offers ramped dimming effects that the original L-O-R boards did
> not.

I'm happy to have guessed that the boards he used in that video did not
do dimming, and that he used a radio to transmit the audio.  :)

I've got a more modest, non-musical display on my house this year.  A
mere 16 channels of dimmable lights is all I could build in time, but 16
extension cords hanging out of my garage door is enough for this year.
Next year I plan on building custom TRIAC boards that are better (read:
probably safer) than simpleio.com's 4-triac board, where they pay great
attention to keeping the AC lines apart from one another, but the trace
widths are too small, and the designer didn't seem to care about keeping
the low-voltage opto lines out from between(!) the high-voltage opto pins.

--Michael

2005\12\14@113945 by Dave Lag

picon face
...Oh, and Jinx:

Your "sheep on Crack" made it to the main news last night.
The anchor messed up the story preceeding he was so tickled- fell apart
actually- stuff for the blooper shows.

2005\12\14@115358 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Dec 14, 2005, at 5:45 AM, Dave Lag wrote:

> I wish I had had my camera
> along last week so you could see how this thing's wired.

Is there a better quality video somewhere?

> Final cool thing is that the Trans-Siberian Orchestra called him
> yesterday and offered him free tickets to their next show in Cincinnati
> with backstage passes and everything. How's that for quick fame?

That's hardly "fame", but IS cool and rather appropriate...

Christmas lights are way up there on the "random acts of kindness and
senseless beauty" scale (mostly the latter, of course.)

BillW

2005\12\14@123256 by Dave Lag

picon face
William Chops Westfield wrote:
> Christmas lights are way up there on the "random acts of kindness and
> senseless beauty" scale (mostly the latter, of course.)
>
> BillW

I was going to scale back myself this year,( nothing to speak of - half
dozen rope lights, snowmen, trees) considering electricity prices etc...

Then the elderly neighbors just gushed about the lights in conversation
recently and ya know, it IS christmas, PC notwithstanding.
turn 'em on a little later, off a little earlier...

Besides, I look like Santa anyways and wouldn't want to taint his
reputation...

2005\12\14@134855 by M Graff

flavicon
face
Dave Lag wrote:
> I was going to scale back myself this year,( nothing to speak of - half
> dozen rope lights, snowmen, trees) considering electricity prices etc...

That's one nice thing about dimmable lights.  I can have the same number
of lights installed, but if I just use full-on for effects, and use
half- or even quarter-brightness for most strings, I have a well-lit
house that costs much less to run.

BTW, I noticed LED bulbs, which I bought several strings of, flicker.  I
wonder if that is because they only use half the sine wave and I'm
seeing the 50% duty cycle or if they full-wave rectify and i'm seeing
the 120 Hz zero-crossings...

--Michael

2005\12\14@140830 by Mike Hord

picon face
> BTW, I noticed LED bulbs, which I bought several strings of, flicker.  I
> wonder if that is because they only use half the sine wave and I'm
> seeing the 50% duty cycle or if they full-wave rectify and i'm seeing
> the 120 Hz zero-crossings...

I'm guessing half-wave rectification is the problem, since 30 Hz might
be in the visible flicker range for a human, but 60 and above isn't likely
to.

Mike H.

2005\12\14@144613 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


>-----Original Message-----
>From: spam_OUTpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu]
>Sent: 14 December 2005 19:08
>To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
>Subject: Re: [OT:] Impressive lighting effects
>
>
>> BTW, I noticed LED bulbs, which I bought several strings of,
>flicker.  
>> I wonder if that is because they only use half the sine wave and I'm
>> seeing the 50% duty cycle or if they full-wave rectify and
>i'm seeing
>> the 120 Hz zero-crossings...
>
>I'm guessing half-wave rectification is the problem, since 30
>Hz might be in the visible flicker range for a human, but 60
>and above isn't likely to.
>
>Mike H.

Another problem with LED's is that they don't have the thermal "inertia" of incandescent lamps which carry on glowing to some extent in between cycles.  An incandescent lamp on half wave rectifed supply might produce some noticeable flicker, but LED's will be far worse.

Regards

Mike

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2005\12\14@145852 by Rolf

face picon face
This is a joke, right?

Half-waved rectified 60Hz AC is still 60Hz!

Or did I miss the boat somewhere... ?

Rolf

Mike Hord wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2005\12\14@154138 by Juan Cubillo

flavicon
face
I also have some free time...

How did he sincronised music with lights?
The only way I can think of is that the song is not continous. The computer
plays a segment of music and displays the light fx. Then it plays the next
segment of music and so on.
Juan Cubillo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Denny Esterline" <firmwarespamKILLspamtds.net>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <.....piclistKILLspamspam.....mit.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 2:43 AM
Subject: [OT:] Impressive lighting effects


This must be what happens when an engineer has too much time on his hands.


http://members.cox.net/transam57/lights.wm

2005\12\14@160901 by Mike Hord

picon face
> This is a joke, right?
>
> Half-waved rectified 60Hz AC is still 60Hz!
>
> Or did I miss the boat somewhere... ?

I think you missed a boat.  If you half-wave rectify 60 Hz
AC, you'll end up with only the positive parts of the sine
wave.  Full-wave rectified AC is 1/60th of a second from
one peak to the next, while half-wave rectified AC is
1/30th of a second from one peak to the next.  Or, to
put it another way, how many positive peaks are there,
per second, in a 60 Hz sine wave?

Mike H.

2005\12\14@161542 by Richard Prosser

picon face
...Or, to
> put it another way, how many positive peaks are there,
> per second, in a 60 Hz sine wave?
>

60

RP

2005\12\14@162853 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
>> Half-waved rectified 60Hz AC is still 60Hz!
>>
>> Or did I miss the boat somewhere... ?
>
> I think you missed a boat.

IIRC full-rectifying is one of the tricks HF guys use to double a
frequency? (of course a LOT of filtering is involved to get something
that resembles a sine)

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2005\12\14@163005 by Mike Hord

picon face
On 12/14/05, Richard Prosser <EraseMErhprosserspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:
> ...Or, to
> > put it another way, how many positive peaks are there,
> > per second, in a 60 Hz sine wave?
> >
>
> 60

Duh.  Yes.  And I'm a jackass.

Yes, a half-wave rectified 60 Hz sine wave is still 60 Hz.
I should have stayed on the boat.

Mike H.

2005\12\14@164501 by Mike Hord

picon face
> >> Half-waved rectified 60Hz AC is still 60Hz!
> >>
> >> Or did I miss the boat somewhere... ?
> >
> > I think you missed a boat.
>
> IIRC full-rectifying is one of the tricks HF guys use to double a
> frequency? (of course a LOT of filtering is involved to get something
> that resembles a sine)

Yes, yes, I know.  Bad afternoon.  Let the mockery begin. ;-)

I was having a flashback to an argument I had with a non-engineer
about frequency content of a square wave.  He had a hard time
understanding why a 25% duty cycle 50 Hz square and a 50%
duty cycle 100 Hz square wave would result in different outputs
when going through the same filter- say, a 50 Hz low pass filter.
I think it was difficult for him because the shape of the pulse was
the same, and he had a difficult time understanding that the
overall waveform was still different.

Mike H.

2005\12\14@172255 by David V. Fansler

flavicon
face
As noted the music was Trans Siberian Orchestra.  In addition to the
commercial controller and software this gentleman used there is free
software and hardware (well the schematic is free) that uses the parallel
printer output of a PC to control up to 1024 outputs.  The hardware can be
found at http://www.ComputerChristmas.com and the software can be downloaded from
http://home.houston.rr.com/dman776/.

Looking toward next year (although the wife has given me 2 years),
David

David V. Fansler
S/V Annabelle
Davidspamspam_OUTDV-Fansler.com
http://www.DV-Fansler.com

http://mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist


2005\12\14@184840 by olin piclist

face picon face
Mike Hord wrote:
> I think you missed a boat.

No, you did.  I can't believe people are having a problem with such a simple
and basic concept.

> If you half-wave rectify 60 Hz
> AC, you'll end up with only the positive parts of the sine
> wave.

OK so far.

> Full-wave rectified AC is 1/60th of a second from
> one peak to the next,

No.  Draw it on a piece of paper if that helps.

> while half-wave rectified AC is
> 1/30th of a second from one peak to the next.

Absolutely not.

> Or, to
> put it another way, how many positive peaks are there,
> per second, in a 60 Hz sine wave?

60.  *Think* about it.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

2005\12\14@194244 by Robert Rolf
picon face
A Canadian effort.
http://www.lightup.ca

M Graff wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2005\12\15@021207 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Dec 14, 2005, at 12:42 PM, Juan Cubillo wrote:

> How did he sincronised music with lights?
>
There are several standardized protocols for synchronizing assorted
thingees with a musical score, used in everything from planetariums
to rock concerts to fireworks shows.  The simplest form is probably
the synchronized cassette/filmstrip projector that dates back at
least 30 years, where you put your audio on one track of a stereo
cassette and info to advance the film on the other track...

It would be EASIER to do this with a digital system; you're playing
back at 44k samples per second; it'd be trivial to run a parallel
data track at 4.4k bytes per second (for instance), letting you
trigger something every tenth of a second or so...

BillW

2005\12\15@165051 by Mike Hord

picon face
On 12/14/05, Olin Lathrop <@spam@olin_piclistKILLspamspamembedinc.com> wrote:
> Mike Hord wrote:

> > Or, to
> > put it another way, how many positive peaks are there,
> > per second, in a 60 Hz sine wave?
>
> 60.  *Think* about it.

Olin-
See my other previous sheepish responses, and thanks for not
giving me the whupping I so richly deserve for spilling such an
elementary error on 2000 cringing observers.

Mike H.

2005\12\15@165340 by Mike Hord

picon face
> It would be EASIER to do this with a digital system....

If one were sufficiently motivated, I'm sure the various models for
generating exciting visual stimulation associated with music which
have become standard in audio players these days could be
adapted for this sort of control.

It probably wouldn't be quite so aesthetically pleasing, though.

Mike H.

2005\12\16@052544 by Bill & Pookie

picon face
Keep the dog so you will be thought of as exocentric instead of crazy.

Pookie,  the dog.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Denny Esterline" <KILLspamfirmwareKILLspamspamtds.net>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <RemoveMEpiclistTakeThisOuTspammit.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 1:57 AM
Subject: Re: [OT:] Impressive lighting effects


{Quote hidden}

> --

2005\12\16@103235 by Marc Lavallée

flavicon
face
Le 16 Décembre 2005 05:25, Bill & Pookie a écrit :
> Keep the dog so you will be thought of as exocentric instead of crazy.

In my neighborhood, the craziest people all have (noisy) dogs.

>> How do I get to be one of these mythical engineers with too
>> much time on his hands ? 8-))
> ...
> > Simple really, divorce the wife, abandon the kids, move away from your
> > parents/siblings/friends, quit your job, turn off you phones, unplug
> > the internet connection, etc, etc.

My solution was: keep the wife, don't keep animals, don't make kids, avoid people, be self-employed, live on a extremely tight budget without a dept problem, don't use the phone, keep the Internet, have wet dreams about a "naked DSL", don't have a car.

> > You'll definitely have more free time, no grantees you'll enjoy it
> > though.

"I'm Not Dead Yet... I Feel Happy! I Feel Happy!"

> > Of course that assumes you've already figured out how to become an
> > engineer

Existential mood swings is  the precise reason why engineers needs more time. The "way to engineering" is their therapy.
--
Marc

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