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'[OT:] Any good site to discuss and learn car repai'
2004\08\23@082540 by Alan B. Pearce

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>And use jackstands.

Don't be like a guy I knew who set out to replace the handbrake cable on his
car, with the car up on a bottle jack on gravel, and the wheel off!!!!

I found him with the rear leaf spring right across his jaw, just as he
passed out. Luckily there were people around (but not in sight) who
responded to my shouting for help, and with several of them lifted the car
and pulled him out.

He had his jaw wired up for about 6 weeks, having all food as liquid through
a straw.

Jack stands are an absolute must. I have used logs of wood, inside a garage,
but don't ever use concrete blocks, they don't like point contact
compression loads and tend to break up.

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2004\08\23@091549 by Howard Winter

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On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 13:27:36 +0100, Alan B. Pearce wrote:

>...<
> Jack stands are an absolute must. I have used logs of wood, inside a garage,

As long as they're solid, not rotting!  :-)  Old railway sleepers (I think you call them ties) are available
as surplus here and are strong enough to take any vehicle I've ever worked on.  A pain to saw them to size,
though.

> but don't ever use concrete blocks, they don't like point contact
> compression loads and tend to break up.

Or bricks - same problem but less strength in the first place.  I've seen someone build a 6-brick-high "stand"
for a car, only to see it fall over (almost in slow motion!) when one edge of the bottom one gave way.  After
he'd taken the wheel off, of course!

My father managed to get his car to fall off whatever stand he was using while he was under it, but luckily he
hadn't taken any wheels off, one pair of wheels was over the kerb and he was lying in the gutter so he wasn't
squashed at all, but he was stuck under there until a passer-by managed to get it jacked up again.

And when you're working under the car, try not to bang your head.  I know of someone who banged his head on
the bottom of the car, reflex threw his head back until it hit the ground, reflex threw his head forward until
it hit the car... he did three "Ow-Ow!" repeats before he managed to stop himself...

Cheers,

Howard Winter
St.Albans, England

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2004\08\23@093245 by Russell McMahon

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> > Jack stands are an absolute must. I have used logs of wood, inside a
garage,

> > but don't ever use concrete blocks, they don't like point contact
> > compression loads and tend to break up.

**** DO NOT IGNORE THIS ADVICE ****
that your days may be long on the face of the land.

Concrete will suddenly fail and "explode" into powder. A block more or less
vanishes almost instantly and the car it was supporting is in free fall.
Death has happened.

Also ALWAYS chock wheels that are not being jacked up at front and back. IF
the car starts to move on the jack etc a chocked wheel may also save an
expensive or injuring fall.



       Russell McMahon

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