Searching \ for '[EE] anti-stat for disk drives' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=anti+stat+disk+drives
Search entire site for: 'anti-stat for disk drives'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE] anti-stat for disk drives'
2010\03\28@154623 by Dr Skip

picon face
I need some advice from the list. I've started using a USB drive dock
that allows one to insert a bare SATA disk drive (2.5", 3.5"). I can
imagine reaching over one dry day and feeling a ZAP as I touch the
drive, or someone grabbing it with fingers on the circuit card. Surely
this is a problem for the average consumer?

What covering or wrap are folks who are in-the-know using to protect the
circuit board at least, or the whole casing? There isn't much room
around the slot, so it can't be a 'case', but a wrap might work. It
would also have to have a vent hole for the drive vent if completely
wrapping it. I would also guess that the outside would be conductive,
while the inside insulated. This precludes the average shrink-wrap, duct
tape, or aluminum foil... ;)

I can see a day when there will be a whole stack of bare drives laying
around or passed around and it seems to be a big risk of loss by
accidental touch.

Thanks,
Skip

2010\03\28@203553 by Jake Anderson

flavicon
face
Dr Skip wrote:
{Quote hidden}

My understanding is that the bare drive docks are for tech's working on
drives/pc's who should be aware of static and its precautions.

If you want to use the drives for storing data put them in an external
case of some kind.

2010\03\28@235014 by Dr Skip

picon face
They're not being sold as such, and according to the chain store we got ours
from, everyone is getting them along with a few bare drives. It's very
convenient to be able to do rotating backups with TB drives and not have to
mess with wall warts and various form factors (even a single vendor will change
case designs) that also double+ the physical volume required for physical
storage. It's also nice to have an interface with enough power to spin up a
large drive, in case you were thinking USB-powered case.

It seems that there is a definite need... "Drive skins".... ;)

Even something adhesive for the board side would probably be welcomed by techs
who pop them in and out and stack them on the shelf, waiting for the next
customer. I've seen some shops that _definitely_ need such.

-Skip


On 3/28/2010 8:35 PM, Jake Anderson wrote:
> Dr Skip wrote:
> My understanding is that the bare drive docks are for tech's working on
> drives/pc's who should be aware of static and its precautions.
>
> If you want to use the drives for storing data put them in an external
> case of some kind.

2010\03\29@045842 by Russell McMahon

face picon face
> It seems that there is a definite need... "Drive skins".... ;)

> Even something adhesive for the board side would probably be welcomed by techs
> who pop them in and out and stack them on the shelf, waiting for the next
> customer. I've seen some shops that _definitely_ need such.

I resemble that. Quick look in office, Hmm, 18 bare drives. Some few
dead and hoping for future resurrection, a few IDE PATA, most SATA.
Pop in cage on desktop. Sizes range from 500 GB down. The few 1TB and
1.5TB are in PC or USB cases.

Where I want an external USB drive I've taken to buying "name brand"
USB2 black bricks that come in the disk manufacturer's bade engineered
case with their psu and their drive. Often no dearer than mix and
match do-you-know-where-your-USB2-drive-controller-came-from
alternatives. Segate is the most non-user-interactive device I've ever
seen. No manual (there is a multilanguage sheet but it has NO useful
information - and it's not needed. There is a connection diagram.  No
fan. Hardly gets warm. No on/off switch. No install software. Plug it
in 1st time and it doesn't even do the usual found this found that
installing xxx - just spins up for a few secinds and then PC announces
that dive has been installed. Painless and seamless so far (6
months?). WD1.5 TB almost as transparent.

I have several "Phlips" branded USB2 external cages which have to go.
Identical except for badges to no name clones. Noisy or dead fans, hot
regardless, slow & poor startup, etc. Philips' great name has been
severely streched with these - may well have nothing to do with them
at all.

R

2010\03\29@074952 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
Dr Skip wrote:
> I can see a day when there will be a whole stack of bare drives laying
> around or passed around and it seems to be a big risk of loss by
> accidental touch.

I can see a day where flash drives are passed around.  Oh, wait, that day is
already here.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2010\03\29@082104 by Russell McMahon

face picon face
> I can see a day where flash drives are passed around.  Oh, wait, that day is
> already here.

I carry 50+ GB of flash when out photographing in earnest* - and I can
see that having to increase as file sizes rise :-(. But it may be a
wee while before they match the 1 TB + rotating thingies.

Perhaps about 1.5 x log_2(1000/16) ~= 8 or 9 years.

1 TB flash by ~= 2018.

Assumes:
Modified Moore's law - doubling every 1.5 years.
16 MB flash ~= 1 TB HDD as near but not at leading edge.

Also - flash may well be replaced by other technology AND new
technology may give a capacity step at inception and maybe a different
growth law.

* 3000 photos x 10 MB = 30 GB
x 20 MB = 60 GB.

JPEG fine + compressed raw is around 15-20 MB/file on Sony A700.
Recent 24+ MP full frames may be several times that :-(.


      Russell.

2010\03\29@085454 by joseph

face
flavicon
face
Philips' great name has been severely tarnished ever since they allowed
that once great name to be licenced for all sorts of cheap far-east
electronic junk.  Wal-Mart, for example, sells all sorts of Philips badged
throwaway electronics whose performance is disappointingly lacking.

Joe


Original Message:
-----------------
From: Russell McMahon spam_OUTapptechnzTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 2010 21:58:21 +1300
To: .....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu
Subject: Re: [EE] anti-stat for disk drives


I have several "Phlips" branded USB2 external cages which have to go.
Identical except for badges to no name clones. Noisy or dead fans, hot
regardless, slow & poor startup, etc. Philips' great name has been
severely streched with these - may well have nothing to do with them
at all.

R
--


--------------------------------------------------------------------
mail2web.com – Enhanced email for the mobile individual based on Microsoft®
Exchange - http://link.mail2web.com/Personal/EnhancedEmail


2010\03\29@131652 by Dr Skip

picon face
I also resemble that... ;) hence the Q.

A post long ago of mine on USB power was directly related to those slim black
box drives. A 250GB (WD) would have trouble on many of the ports around here.
Putting it inside a laptop seemed to work, except it would have errors on spin
up if not spinning. Either a speed or power issue I suppose. The solution was
to not let it shut off. Replaced with a Hitachi 500GB and all is well again.

Not the first USB-powered drive to suck too much power (or something)...

That onerous WD drive is now in the collection for the desktop hot-swap bare
base and works fine there. I'm also trying to retire a whole stack of odd LARGE
black boxes with dedicated wall warts...

The future problem is in keeping these things safe. So far, the bare drive
method is the most convenient - drop in a drive in the slot and 2TB is there.
Need another? Pop it out and another in - no wall wart swapping (which supply
goes to that one now???) or rows of simulated plastic 'books' on the desk - and
no swapping USB cables in and out and tracing to whichever drive it goes to.


On 3/29/2010 4:58 AM, Russell McMahon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2010\03\29@135140 by Russell McMahon

face picon face
> no swapping USB cables in and out and tracing to whichever drive it goes to.

Coloured plastic tape wrap on cord at each end of cable.
Two colours per end if many leads.
Quicker in brain than numbers.

I use for meter leads on bench when using N meters at once when eg
prototyping. Helps heaps.



              Russell

2010\03\29@142020 by Dr Skip

picon face
That would help, but it's not the biggest part of the problem. Thanks.

The desk space that book-like drive cases use and having to arrange a tree
architecture of power strips for their wall warts is too much. While power
strips of power strips of power strips may be safe from an engineering and
electrical point of view, given the low consumption of each, it does cause most
folks to question one's sanity over it.

The single (or even 2) little bases and a drawer full of 2TB drives is much
more elegant and simple. Now if it could be made a little 'safer' for the data
and electronics...


On 3/29/2010 1:51 PM, Russell McMahon wrote:
>
> Coloured plastic tape wrap on cord at each end of cable.
> Two colours per end if many leads.
> Quicker in brain than numbers.

2010\03\29@150331 by Bob Ammerman

picon face

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dr Skip" <drskipspamKILLspamgmail.com>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <.....piclistKILLspamspam.....mit.edu>
Sent: Monday, March 29, 2010 2:20 PM
Subject: Re: [EE] anti-stat for disk drives


{Quote hidden}

You used to be able to buy a "bay" that would mount right in a 5.25 inch
drive bay in your computer and then buy multiple "sleds" that would hold
3.5" drives and slide into the bay. I haven't seen such in quite some time.

-- Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

2010\03\29@174506 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
I dislike USB hard drive enclosures ......  although I use them.
I having been moving toward external SATA and converting old USB Hard  
Drive enclosures into eSATA Hard Drive Enclosures.
      I have even converted internal SATA cables into eSATA cables  
( don't ask for an image , they are ugly )

Gus

2010\03\30@063910 by Lee Jones

flavicon
face
>> The single (or even 2) little bases and a drawer full of 2TB drives
>> is much more elegant and simple. Now if it could be made a little
>> 'safer' for the data and electronics...

Apparently, such a cover exists.  Other World Computing (long time
Macintosh accessory store whose items work just as well with PC's;
web site URL is http://www.macsales.com) has an 0.080" thick, molded,
flexible silicone rubber sleeve for disk drives -- it has enlarged
bumpers on all 4 corners plus a solid cover for the printed wiring
board.  Comes in sizes for 2.5" and 3.5" disk drives.  Each is $9.95.
Newer Technology is the brand; they call it ProtectaDrive.  See

   http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Newer%20Technology/HDANTISH35/

They also have the desktop dock for "bare" SATA disk drives.


> You used to be able to buy a "bay" that would mount right in a
> 5.25 inch drive bay in your computer and then buy multiple "sleds"
> that would hold 3.5" drives and slide into the bay. I haven't seen
> such in quite some time.

I have not seen the 5.25" drive bay variant in a while.  Carrier
trays tended to be complex because IDE drive data connectors were
not sufficiently standardized and 4-pin Molex power connector did
not lend itself to easy insertion/removal.

But it's fairly common to be able to get tray style mounting in
external multi-bay drive storage.  OWC has enclosures with 2, 4, 5,
or 8 slots with interfaces of eSATA (majority), FireWire, or USB;
come in either desktop or rack mount form factor.  SATA drives mount
on trays.  You plug tray in slot -- hardware is hot-swappable;
software issues may limit how well hot swap actually works.  Look
in OWC's "Internal Storage" category under "0GB Enclosure Kits".

Drobo uses a hot swap concept with no tray.  Slots in enclosure
are exactly sized for 3.5" SATA disk drive.  You plug drive itself
into each bay; latch holds drive in position.  Only possible because
SATA drives have both power & data connectors highly standardized.
See http://www.datarobotics.com.

                                               Lee

2010\03\30@163537 by Dr Skip

picon face
I like that! Good idea for even PATA drives with the
USB-to-adapter-in-a-connector product.

However, the corners and little doors at the connector would preclude dropping
it into a desktop bay slot. There's enough gap for a mylar/paper/cello type
cover, but maybe not even enough for a silicone wrap, unless very thin.

>From another reply - I've also had several boxes go bad. They run very warm and
in 2 cases took out the internal PS taking the drive with it! Most the others
have fans going bad. Got some convection cooled ones that can keep a beverage
warm...

I don't really trust them anymore. Been using the bare drive method with PATA
too and so far I like it much better. I do see a risk though, and just because
one has run with scissors without incident in the past, doesn't mean it's a
safe thing to do. ;)



On 3/30/2010 6:40 AM, Lee Jones wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2010\03\31@045319 by Russell McMahon

face picon face
> >From another reply - I've also had several boxes go bad. They run very warm and
> in 2 cases took out the internal PS taking the drive with it! Most the others
> have fans going bad. Got some convection cooled ones that can keep a beverage
> warm...

AS I noted - if I buy external USB drives now it's ones sold by the HD
manufacturers with their own drives in. I have WD and Seagate versions
and both are fanless and run coolish. The Seagate is especially
impressively low key. No power swith no light (AFAIR), no obvious
ventiallation slots - they are there but you hav eto poke things into
inobvious places to find if a slot is hidden there. No installation -
connect and go. Not even any messages while installing. The most
painless device of its type that I've met so far.

HINT: But, we all know this by now, don't we :-).
When I remember [tm] when I get a new product with external psu I use
indellible marker write the voltage and current and polarity on the
device and I write the ID of the product on the psu. Sometimes even
comes in handy. Black on black  often works well - hold  to light at
angle to read.


      R






                Russell

2010\03\31@054301 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Mar 31, 2010, at 1:52 AM, Russell McMahon wrote:

> When I remember [tm] when I get a new product with external psu I use
> indellible marker write the voltage and current and polarity on the
> device and I write the ID of the product on the psu. Sometimes even
> comes in handy.

I'm surprised that vendors don't provide little stickers for you to  
put on their (generic) power bricks.  That would be so much neater...

BillW

2010\03\31@102843 by Marcel Duchamp

picon face
On 3/31/2010 2:42 AM, William "Chops" Westfield wrote:
>
> On Mar 31, 2010, at 1:52 AM, Russell McMahon wrote:
>
>> When I remember [tm] when I get a new product with external psu I use
>> indellible marker write the voltage and current and polarity on the
>> device and I write the ID of the product on the psu. Sometimes even
>> comes in handy.
>
> I'm surprised that vendors don't provide little stickers for you to
> put on their (generic) power bricks.  That would be so much neater...
>
> BillW
>
Business cards.  Write on back what it's for, fold in half, secure
around cord with staples.  These days, what use is there for business
cards other than mixing small amounts of 5 minute epoxy?

2010\03\31@192956 by Dario Greggio

face picon face
Marcel Duchamp ha scritto:

> Business cards.  Write on back what it's for, fold in half, secure
> around cord with staples.  These days, what use is there for business
> cards other than mixing small amounts of 5 minute epoxy?


cocaine, maybe?? :)))


--

Ciao, Dario
--
Cyberdyne

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2010 , 2011 only
- Today
- New search...