Searching \ for '[EE] Vintage 68000 vs Modern 68HC000' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=vintage+68000+modern
Search entire site for: 'Vintage 68000 vs Modern 68HC000'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE] Vintage 68000 vs Modern 68HC000'
2006\10\16@170018 by Sean Schouten

face picon face
Dear List,

Is there anyone here that can point me out what the exact differences are
between the original 68k processor (used in the old amiga & apple computers)
and the new embedded 68HC000 concerning everything and anything except the
pin-outs? I am interested to know because I am looking to replace a vintage
one with it's modern cousin.

All the information I can get on the subject is welcome as I am still in the
process of sifting through the shear amount of material google brings up on
anything to do with 68k.

Thanks!

Sean

2006\10\16@171817 by Charles Craft

picon face
www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MC68000&nodeId=0162468rH3YTLC61654622

http://tinyurl.com/yb6s5d

MC68000 : Low Cost 32-Bit Microprocessor
(Including HC000, HC001, EC000 and SEC000)


The industry's lowest cost 32-bit microprocessor, the MC68000 offers an excellent low cost entry point to the M68000 Family. The MC68HC000 is a CMOS version of the original MC68000. The MC68HC001 is also a CMOS version of the original MC68000 with 8-/16-bit selectable data bus. The MC68EC000 version provides a lower cost 68000 solution. The MC68SEC000 version provides a static, low power implementation consuming only 15.0mA in normal 3.3V operation and 0.5mA in static standby mode.

{Original Message removed}

2006\10\16@173343 by Sean Schouten

face picon face
On 10/16/06, Charles Craft <spam_OUTchuckseaTakeThisOuTspammindspring.com> wrote:
>
>
> The industry's lowest cost 32-bit microprocessor, the MC68000 offers an
> excellent low cost entry point to the M68000 Family. The MC68HC000 is a CMOS
> version of the original MC68000. The MC68HC001 is also a CMOS version of the
> original MC68000 with 8-/16-bit selectable data bus. The MC68EC000 version
> provides a lower cost 68000 solution. The MC68SEC000 version provides a
> static, low power implementation consuming only 15.0mA in normal 3.3Voperation and
> 0.5mA in static standby mode.


I vaguely remember some one mentioning something about the instruction set
and possibly even the timing beeing off? Could that be? I can't seem to find
a *changelog* concerning this processor anywhere.

Thanks,

Sean.

2006\10\16@191233 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Oct 16, 2006, at 2:00 PM, Sean Schouten wrote:

> Is there anyone here that can point me out what the exact differences
> are between the original 68k processor and the new embedded 68HC000
> concerning everything and anything except the pin-outs?

I think an 68xx000 is still pretty much a 68000; the "new embedded"
chips you're thinking of are the "coldfire" processors which (very
sensibly) have completely different part numbers.  If you look at the
32bit CPU guide here:

http://www.freescale.com/files/shared/doc/selector_guide/SG1001.pdf

It says the 68HC000 is completely compatible with the 68000, except
it has 1/10th the power consumption.  The EC000 has 8/16 selectable
bus, and the SEC000 is static.  No more 64bit DIPs, though.

In addition to the coldfire processors (MCF5xxx), there are also the
68xx3xx chips, which add peripherals for a more microcontroller-like
system.

> I am interested to know because I am looking to replace a
> vintage one with it's modern cousin.

I don't think there is much point in that.  Did you have some
specific goal in mind?

BillW

2006\10\16@210308 by Sean Schouten

face picon face
First of all; thanks for all the added information. I think I know enough
just knowing that the 68HC000 should do the trick and is completely
compatible with the old-school 68k.


On 10/17/06, William Chops Westfield <.....westfwKILLspamspam@spam@mac.com> wrote:
>
>
> I don't think there is much point in that.  Did you have some
> specific goal in mind?
>


Well, a friend has an old system that's kind of got a broken 68k, so he was
actually thinking of replacing it with a 68HC000 that he came across. But
because I heard something about the instruction set and probably even the
timings differing like you know, I wasn't quite sure about it.. I guess that
there is only one way to find out though... *evil grin*.

Thanks again!

Sean

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2006 , 2007 only
- Today
- New search...