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'[EE] USB pass through cable gland'
2009\03\02@172606 by Brent Brown

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Hi,

I'm looking for a production suitable method of getting USB cables into a sealed
enclosure, IP65 or thereabouts. Cables are required to be installed in the field - at
least once in the lifetime of the equipment, but are seldom removed. Would like to
use off the shelf USB cables if possible and avoid re-termination of connectors.
Special waterproof USB A plug/receptacles could be used and pre-terminated
cables could be supplied, but that's an expensive option.

I have seen off the shelf USB cables with the USB type A plug trimmed down a bit
and passed through a standard plastic threaded gland into an enclosure. Trouble is
it needs a way oversized gland, proper cable sealing becomes difficult, and I don't
like the idea of the installer having to whittle away the overmoulded plug.

Just wondering if anyone has any cunning ideas for this? I can almost envisage
what a special USB cable gland might look like... a rectangular hole to pass the
USB A plug through, two piece rubber seals that seal rectangular hole to round
cable, and (this is the really hard part) some kind of a two piece snap together
locking nut that assembles around the cable and tightens into the gland. The
assumption is that it's not possible to slide the gland components on from the other
end of the cable.

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  spam_OUTbrent.brownTakeThisOuTspamclear.net.nz


2009\03\02@174608 by Dave Tweed

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Brent Brown wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I take it that it's the USB "host" device that goes inside the enclosure,
and you don't control this piece of equipement, hence the requirement for
a standard full-size type-A connector.

How about using a mini-USB or micro-USB cable, and an off-the-shelf adapter
to the full-size "A" connector inside the box?

-- Dave Tweed

2009\03\02@175330 by Mike Harrison

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On Tue, 03 Mar 2009 11:25:21 +1300, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Bulgin do some sealed USB options.
Another thought is that a B plug (maybe also A) will probably go through the hole that a gland
screws into, so  an option may be to investigate getting a USB cable assembly made with the gland
already on it.
For small volumes, you can get self-wirable USB cables that you could put  on the end after passing
the cable through the gland - this could be done as a ready-made assembly as above so it doesn't
need to be done in the field.

2009\03\02@180443 by Dr Skip

picon face
If hot insertion isn't a requirement, use any 4 conductor connector that suits
the environmentals, say a water-tight RJ-11 or such. Just spec it as
connectable only when unpowered. I've seen various adapter kits that have USB
to "RJ-whatever and beyond" adapters, so it's not an entirely crazy idea. I
believe there are only 2 issues the proper connectors address - power/gnd
connection before data (hot plugging), and shielding (USB 1.1 less critical
than 2.0 I'd estimate). Assess how stringent your needs are in those areas and
go for another connector, possibly via an adapter in your case if you don't
want to re-terminate.

-Skip


Brent Brown wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2009\03\02@205957 by Michael Algernon

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{Quote hidden}

One of these might work.......
http://www.boltproducts.com/heyco/strain-lockit-relief-bushings.html

MA


WFT Electronics
Denver, CO   720 222 1309
" dent the UNIVERSE "

All ideas, text, drawings and audio , that are originated by WFT  
Electronics ( and it's principals ),  that are included with this  
signature text are to be deemed to be released to the public domain as  
of the date of this communication .

2009\03\02@211143 by Sean Breheny

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Afraid I cannot help with the original question, but the term "cable
gland" is a new one to me...had to Google it. I would have called that
a "cable grip" or "cord grip".

Sean


On Mon, Mar 2, 2009 at 5:25 PM, Brent Brown <.....brent.brownKILLspamspam@spam@clear.net.nz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2009\03\03@041403 by Ruben Jönsson

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The search term "split cable glands" on google (not sure if that is the proper
or optimal name for best hits though) came up with some possibilities:

<http://www.icotek.de/pdf/2008/e/0805_KVT_15-17e.pdf>

<http://www.indexmarine.co.uk/pages/glands1.htm>

<http://news.thomasnet.com/fullstory/30430>

/Ruben

{Quote hidden}

> -

2009\03\03@041934 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Afraid I cannot help with the original question, but the term
>"cable gland" is a new one to me...had to Google it.

A cable gland will typically be a gas/liquid tight seal.

>I would have called that a "cable grip" or "cord grip".

A grip will only stop the cable being pulled out of the equipment that it is
permanently wired into.


The link that Michael Algernon provided looks like there is some form of
open gland that can be put over the cable that is then held with some form
of grip, to make a gas/liquid tight seal - least that was my take on a brief
look at it.

2009\03\03@092310 by alan smith

picon face

Check with Samtec, SCPU series


--- On Tue, 3/3/09, Ruben Jönsson <EraseMErubenspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTpp.sbbs.se> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> > --

2009\03\03@103817 by Eoin Ross

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I think these might fit the bill?
http://www.weidmuller.com/downloads/pdfs/datasheets/LIT0313_Cabtite.pdf


>>> Brent Brown <RemoveMEbrent.brownTakeThisOuTspamclear.net.nz> 02 Mar 09 17:25:21 >>>
Hi,

I'm looking for a production suitable method of getting USB cables into a sealed
enclosure, IP65 or thereabouts. Cables are required to be installed in the field - at
least once in the lifetime of the equipment, but are seldom removed. Would like to
use off the shelf USB cables if possible and avoid re-termination of connectors.
<snip>
Just wondering if anyone has any cunning ideas for this? I can almost envisage
what a special USB cable gland might look like... a rectangular hole to pass the
USB A plug through, two piece rubber seals that seal rectangular hole to round
cable, and (this is the really hard part) some kind of a two piece snap together
locking nut that assembles around the cable and tightens into the gland. The
assumption is that it's not possible to slide the gland components on from the other
end of the cable.
--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions

Eoin Ross
Industrial computer support and design

CHEMSTATION INTERNATIONAL
http://www.chemstation.com

3400 Encrete Lane     Ph  937 294 8265    Ext 1109
Dayton                       Fax  937 534 0368
Ohio
45439


2009\03\03@130452 by peter green

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Sean Breheny wrote:
> Afraid I cannot help with the original question, but the term "cable
> gland" is a new one to me...had to Google it. I would have called that
> a "cable grip" or "cord grip".
>  
A gland is generally more than just a cord grip. While one function is
indeed to grip the cable they also generally provide a seal arround the
cable with some level of waterproofing (what level depends on the
particular gland)

2009\03\03@132406 by Michael Algernon

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>
samtec.com/technical_specifications/catalog.asp?series=SCPU&menu=STANDARD_PRODUCTS
SAMTEC makes it hard to understand how their parts work.
MA


{Quote hidden}

WFT Electronics
Denver, CO   720 222 1309
" dent the UNIVERSE "

All ideas, text, drawings and audio , that are originated by WFT  
Electronics ( and it's principals ),  that are included with this  
signature text are to be deemed to be released to the public domain as  
of the date of this communication .

2009\03\03@200337 by Brent Brown

picon face
On 2 Mar 2009 at 17:46, Dave Tweed wrote:

{Quote hidden}

There are presently two options for inside the box. Option 1 is a standard off the
shelf USB hub, so yes I could use mini USB cables with adaptors.., although I would
be more worried than usual about vibration causing plugs to work loose. Option 2
we will include a USB hub controller on our own PCB, so once again yes we could
conceivably use mini USB connectors. Thanks for the idea!


--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  brent.brownEraseMEspam.....clear.net.nz


2009\03\03@200546 by Brent Brown

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On 2 Mar 2009 at 22:51, Mike Harrison wrote:

{Quote hidden}

OK, I'll look into Bulgin some more. The guy from Tyco was here the other day, he's
putting together some job pricing on supplying waterproof USB panel mount
receptacles with short flying leads and some kind of simple 2mm pitch PCB plug
fitted.

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  EraseMEbrent.brownspamclear.net.nz


2009\03\03@200853 by Brent Brown

picon face
On 2 Mar 2009 at 18:52, Michael Algernon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Interesting... nice idea but looks like these ones don't focus on sealing.

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  RemoveMEbrent.brownEraseMEspamEraseMEclear.net.nz


2009\03\03@200944 by Brent Brown

picon face
On 3 Mar 2009 at 10:13, Ruben Jönsson wrote:

> The search term "split cable glands" on google (not sure if that is the proper
> or optimal name for best hits though) came up with some possibilities:
>
> <www.icotek.de/pdf/2008/e/0805_KVT_15-17e.pdf>
>
> <www.indexmarine.co.uk/pages/glands1.htm>
>
> <http://news.thomasnet.com/fullstory/30430>

Awesome, why didn't I think of that? Like the look of the Icotek one at first glance.

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  RemoveMEbrent.brownspam_OUTspamKILLspamclear.net.nz


2009\03\03@201316 by Brent Brown

picon face
On 3 Mar 2009 at 9:19, Alan B. Pearce wrote:

> >Afraid I cannot help with the original question, but the term
> >"cable gland" is a new one to me...had to Google it.
>
> A cable gland will typically be a gas/liquid tight seal.
>
> >I would have called that a "cable grip" or "cord grip".
>
> A grip will only stop the cable being pulled out of the equipment that it is
> permanently wired into.
>
>
> The link that Michael Algernon provided looks like there is some form of
> open gland that can be put over the cable that is then held with some form
> of grip, to make a gas/liquid tight seal - least that was my take on a brief
> look at it.


Yep, I thought there would be variations on what people call these things. I agree
with Alans definition, I'm looking for something that grips/clamps/holds/locks/fixes
the cord/cable/wire at the entry point into the box/enclosure/bulkhead/mounting
surface and also offers a degree of sealing against dust and water ingress.

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  RemoveMEbrent.brownTakeThisOuTspamspamclear.net.nz


2009\03\04@082949 by Dave Tweed

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flavicon
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Brent Brown wrote:
> On 2 Mar 2009 at 17:46, Dave Tweed wrote:
> > I take it that it's the USB "host" device that goes inside the
> > enclosure, and you don't control this piece of equipement, hence
> > the requirement for a standard full-size type-A connector.
> >
> > How about using a mini-USB or micro-USB cable, and an off-the-shelf
> > adapter to the full-size "A" connector inside the box?
>
> There are presently two options for inside the box. Option 1 is a
> standard off the shelf USB hub, so yes I could use mini USB cables
> with adaptors.., although I would be more worried than usual about
> vibration causing plugs to work loose. Option 2 we will include a
> USB hub controller on our own PCB, so once again yes we could
> conceivably use mini USB connectors.

The hidden implication in my first response was that if you *do* control
the equipment the cable connects to (option 2), then you can use any
connector at all (consistent with the high-speed digital signal).

You don't need to confine yourself to the officially-blessed connectors.
That's only required if you want to put the USB logo on the cable and
allow connection to arbitrary other equipment.

For example, I'm using Hirose DF11 type board-to-wire connectors for
nearly all of my signals, including USB, in a vehicle-mounted system.
These are reasonably compact and have a mechanical detent for good
retention. Since they use individual crimp-on wire contacts, they can
be passed through pretty much any hole prior to snapping them into the
housing.

-- Dave Tweed

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